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U310.  RARE HEINISCH BOWIE KNIFE: This is a rare American Bowie knife by the noted American Cutler Rochus Heinisch, of Newark, New Jersey. American Bowie knives are very rare; many times rarer than Sheffield Bowies that dominated the U.S. market place in the early to mid-1800s. Heinisch Bowie knives are extremely rare; and according to Bill Williamson, all appear to have been made in the 1850's. There are very few known specimens that have surfaced to date. This Bowie knife measures 13 1/2" in overall length, and is a handful of Knife; a heavy, full sized Bowie weighing nearly a pound (15 oz.). The 8" clip blade x 1 1/16" wide x from 3/32" thick stock has a 4 1/8" false edge on top, with the ricasso being hot stamped, "R. HEINISH". The blade tang extends through the end of the hilt and is capped off with a threaded brass nut. The blade has been period sharpening, and retains its original blade shape with a full tip. There are no nicks to the blade when running your finger over the edge. There are a few areas of light black spots on the blade, as can be expected, but overall; the blade is in excellent condition. The 3 5/8" wide integral S shaped cross guard and ferrule, as well as the 5 3/8" long birds head hilt, are made from separate Iron castings, and the cross guard and hilt are tight and rigid. The hilt is incised with dozens of lozenge shaped indentation's that appear to have been ground into the hilt to help with the grip of this heavy Bowie, and slightly lighten it. There are good traces of the original black Japanning inside these incisions. This knife was located in California, which accounts for the scabbard.  It is not original to the knife, but is a 19th century scabbard for a California knife.  A nearly identical Heinisch Bowie knife with a 12 5/8" blade and brass mounted sheath sold in an April 2006 auction for $9,080 (around $10K including buyer's premium, tax (S/H).

In the famous William R. Williamson article on Heinisch Bowies, he states that the name of R. Heinisch can be added to the select little group of American cutlers who made Bowie and fighting type knives of quality. He writes about Rochus Heinisch, Jr. (son of New Jersey cutler Rochus Heinisch Sr.) who was a Lieutenant in Company A of the Union forces during the U.S. Civil War. As an officer of the 26th Regiment of New Jersey Infantry Volunteers, he was involved in a charge of Confederate forces by crossing the Rappahannock River, 3 miles south of the town of Fredericksburg, Virginia, on June 5th, 1863. A copy of this article from the Gun Report in 1972 will be provided to the purchaser of this Bowie knife. Here is an opportunity to own a Rare American made Civil War period bowie knife. A nearly identical Heinisch Bowie knife with a 12 5/8" blade and brass mounted sheath sold in an April 2006 auction for $9,080, and currently there is an identical one available on N, Flayderman INC for $8200.00, which shows how rare a Bowie Knife it truly is!  This is available for much less and a GREAT buy!!  $7200.00REDUCED $6000.00

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U383. RARE HEINISCH BOWIE KNIFE: This is a rare American Bowie knife by the noted American Cutler Rochus Heinisch, of Newark, New Jersey. American Bowie knives are very rare; many times rarer than Sheffield Bowies that dominated the U.S. market place in the early to mid-1800s.  Heinisch Bowie knives are extremely rare; and according to Bill Williamson, all appear to have been made in the 1850's. There are very few known specimens that have surfaced to date.  This being a previously unseen design, and only the second I have handled.

This Bowie knife measures 12 1/4" in overall length with its original scabbard.  The 7 3/8" clip blade x 1 1/16" wide shows period sharpening, and hot stamped, "R. HEINISH". The blade tang extends through a walnut grip with a brass ferrule at the brass cross guard, and a brass pale where the tang is pinned. The tang is loose due to shrinkage.  The sheath is original to the knife with a little shrinkage and the tip missing. On the grip are stamped the initials "J.R.M." however, there is nothing else indicating a units and there are too many soldiers with those initials to make a positive identification. In the famous William Williamson article on Heinisch Bowies, he states that the name of R. Heinisch can be added to the select little group of American cutlers who made Bowie and fighting type knives of quality.  Here is an opportunity to own a Rare American made Civil War period bowie knife. $2100.00REDUCED $1700.00

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U631. SAUERBIER M1850 STAFF & FIELD SWORD - PRESENTED TO ASST. SURGEON, NEW YORK 11TH REGIMENT NATIONAL GUARD INFANTRY: This is a high quality Sauerbier Staff & Field sword presented Asst. Surgeon Joseph Ward. The sword retains 95% original gold wash on all the brass and 100% original grip and wire, as well as a frosty blade. The presentation is on the reverse side of the top mounts and reads as follows.

Presented by

Wm Rankin Esq

To hisGrandson

Joseph B. Ward , MD

Newark, N.J.

June 25th 1862

The New York Eleventh Regiment, Washington Rifles was a National Guard unit and prior to April 27, 1835, there are no positive records of this regiment on file.  At that time the organization was known as the 2d Regiment, Washington Guards, New York State Light Infantry; about 1856 this designation was changed to 11th Regiment, "Washington Rifles."  It was disbanded January 14, 1899.

Its Service in the War of the Rebellion was short. It left New York City, its home station, May 28, 1862, commanded by Col. Joachim Maidhof, and was mustered into the service of the United States for three months, at Harper's Ferry, W. Va.  It served in the 2d Brigade, Sigel's Division, Department of Shenandoah, from June 8, 1862, and at Harper's Ferry, and was mustered out at New York City, to date September 16, 1862. In June 18, 1863, its ten companies, left the State under orders for thirty days' service, commanded by Colonel Maidhof, and preceded to Harrisburg, Pa.; it served in the 4th Brigade, 1st Division, Department Susquehanna, and was mustered out of the United States service, July 20, 1863, in New York City.

11th Regiment National Guard Infantry

Left State for Harper's Ferry, W. Va., May 28, 1862.Attached to 2nd Brigade, Sigel's Division, Dept. of the Shenandoah, and duty at Harper's Ferry until September. Mustered out September 16, 1862.

Again left State for Harrisburg, Pa., June 18, 1863.Attached to 4th Brigade, 1st Division, Dept. of the Susquehanna. Skirmish at Oyster Point, Pa., June 28. Mustered out July 20, 1863.

Joseph Ward was the units Assistant Surgeon during its initial 3-month service. He enlisted on 5/28/1862 at New York City, NY as an Asst. Surgeon and on 5/28/1862 was commissioned into Field & Staff, NY 11th Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 9/16/1862 at New York, NY.

Thought his military service was short, it is not often you find a presentation sword for a medical doctor during the Civil War. $5500.00REDUCED $4400.00

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U634. MODEL 1852 NAVAL OFFICERS SWORD – SWORD OF COMMANDER GEORGE WINGATE (USN 1863-1887) by JOSEPH STARKEY, LONDON: This sword is published and featured on pages 111-112 of U.S. Naval Officers There Swords and Dirks by Peter Tuite. Tuite wrote the following description: “An imported presentation grade sword made in London. The obverse blade has the owner’s name: George E. Wingate, upside down along the blade. The obverse ricasso shows a six-sided star with a centered 1/4 inch diameter brass insert marked Proved. The reverse ricasso etching shows the manufacturer’s name: Joseph/Starkey/Conduit St/London.

George Wingate was a Civil War volunteer who was appointedan acting ensign in 1863 and retired as a commander in 1887. Wingate was born in New Hampshire and was appointed an Acting Ensign on 4 November 1863. During the Civil War, he initially served on the bark Arthur in the West Gulf Squadron under David Farragut. He later served with the North Atlantic Squadron under David Porter on the double-ended gunboat Oseola. His ship joined in the attack on Fort Fisher. He made a career of the Navy and was promoted to master in March 1868, and lieutenant in Dec 1868. In 1870 he was promoted to the rank of lieutenant commander and rose to his final rank of commander in 1887. In addition to sea service, his career included tours of duty in the torpedo service, lighthouse inspection, and commander of the Malden, Mass Nitro Depot.  He retired on 3 June 1897 and died on 7 June 1897.

The grip is 5 1/2 inches long and topped with the pattern pommel. The grip has 8 turns of a triple wire on a course grained shagreen wrap, I has a relatively heavy twisted round copper gilt wire in the center with single strands of much finer gilt wire on each side. The straight blade is 28 1/4 inches long, 1 1/18 inches wide at the ricasso. It has a single wide fuller. The once frosty blade is deeply etched. The obverse has the owner’s name etched George E. Wingate with a fancy boarder, a fouled anchor with shield, a floral, a blank oval formed by crisp stars, completed by a ship’s mast with tops containing a battle ax, pike, trident, all topped with a pennant engraved USN an foliate above. The reverse blade has a floral, a long necked eagle atop a crude cannon topped by sunrays, a fouled line with oak leaves and acorns, and a foliate above. The scabbard mounts are English-made and are gilded and designed different from the standard pattern. All mounts also are raised, chased on both sides and have rounded edges with no screws.   Wingate’s Widow Pension file is included.$2800.00REDUCED $2500.00

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U646. HIGH-GRADE M1850 ARTILLERY OR INFANTRY OFFICER STAFF & FIELD SWORD: This sword is so unique that no other example is currently known to exist. It is a High-Grade M1850 Staff & Field sword most likely carried by and Artillery officer because of the curved shape of the blade, which conforms to other Artillery Officer sword.  From the unique design of the blade and scabbard we know this was made by Sauerbier. The hilt is tight with a flying eagle on the pommel cap, 100% blade shark-skin grip all original triple-strand wire. The 34 1/4 inch curved blade has the unstopped fuller associated with Sauerbier, but is unmarked. The etching displays some original frosting and is decorated with the American flag and Shield, a UNION etched banner, and a flying eagle with US and the word UNION on the opposite side. The Sauerbier scabbard is one-of-kind with it pewter inlayed brass mounts and ornate chase etching between the mounts to include a flying eagle holding a UNION banner, etched vine works with E PLURIBUS UNUM. The photos do not due the blade justice. $8500.00REDUCED $7900.00   

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U654. M1860 NAVAL CUTLASS, MINT SCABBARD: This is an 1862 dated and inspected M1860 Naval Cutlass with a mint condition original scabbard. Additionally, it is made rarer because it still has the original double-strand wire over 100% original leather. The brass basket guard is near perfict and tight with rack number 21M over 788. The pommel cap has matching patina and inspected marked “D R” as on the blade. The 25 1/2 inch blade shows wear with areas of dark spotting, and is Ames marked as well as dated and inspected: U.S.N. 1852 D.R., and has the original blade washer.  The scabbard is very minty and is by far the best I have seen.  If the blade were better, it would easily be a $2500.00 piece.  If you are a collector of naval cutlasses, don’t let this one get away.

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U673. ROBY PRESENTATION M1850 STAFF & FIELD SWORD, CHAPLAIN 111TH NEW YORK INFANTRY – GETTYSBURG: This sword came out of a long-time collection of New York State identified swords, and a search of records at the National Archives, as well as all Civil War data base files, reveal only one Field & Staff Officers associated with this name.

John Nelson Brown

 Chaplain 111th New York Volunteer Infantry

The presentation reads:

Presented to

Lieut J. N. Brown

by H. S. Brown

He is the only Staff & Field officer (Chaplain) associated with this name for all New York regiments, as well as all other State troops fighting for the Union. Chaplain Brown was mustered in August 1862 and was with the regiment when it surrendered at Harper’s Ferry in September 1862. He was present for the Battle of Gettysburg, and is documented as being on the front line preaching to the soldiers, and giving comfort to the injured and dying during the battle. He would be present during the Battle of the Wilderness and Spotsylvania, as well as Cold Harbor and the Siege of Petersburg.

This style sword was authorized for carry by all S & F officers regardless of rank, and since Chaplain's did hold dual rank in the Civil War and were assigned to a Staff & Field position, the sword is appropriate for him as a Lieutenant and Chaplain. The identity of the presenter H. S. Brown is currently unknown, but most likely is a relative.

The sword is made by Roby, Chelmsford Massachusetts. The hilt is tight and retains good traces of original gold wash, and has 100% original shark-skin grip and triple strand wire. The blade is bright and frosty with outstanding etching. The scabbard is dent free, retains all original mounts, and the presentation on the top Roby marking are east to read. Included with the sword is a binder containing historical information, and Browns’ military and pension file.  This sword has been hidden away for many years in a private collection and only recently surfaced for sale.  Here is an opportunity to not only own a piece of Civil War history, but a sword carried by a Chaplain during the pivotal battle of Gettysburg. $6800.00

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U679. AMES TYPE-2 M1850 STAFF & FIELD SWORD: This is an earlier version of the Ames M1850 Type-2 Staff & Field sword as is evident by the block etched US on the blade. The hilt is tight with no movement, and retains original gold on the basket, but not the pommel cap or scabbard mounts. The remaining bass has a mixed reddish-brown patina. The shark-skin grip and double strand wire is 100% original. The blade washer holds the blade is tight.  Blade length is 32 inches and retains much original frosting with the standard eagle; block etched US and Ames marking. The type-2 scabbard is complete with all brass fittings and original screws. It is dent free and the brass mounts have the same matching patina as the hilt.  The blue scabbard has taken on a nice rich brown patina. This sword shows evidence of being carried, but was well maintained. $2100.00

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U682. HIGH-GRADE UNMARKED AMES M1850 PRESENTATION GRADE STAFF & FIELD SWORD:  This is an amazing high-grade unmarked Ames M1850 presentation grade Staff & Field sword. The hilt retains almost all its original gold wash, and has beautiful chase work. The shark-skin grip and wire is 100% original. The blade retains 100% original frosting and is decorated with several battle scenes that simply are amazing. The scabbard is in near-mint condition with fancy mounts that have great chase work on all sided. Also, included are the original gold washed hanger chains.  It will be hard to find a better example! $6995.00

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U683. AMES M1852 NAVAL OFFICER SWORD:  This Ames M1852 Naval Officer sword is in near-mint condition. The hilt is tight with 100% white shark-skin grip and double-strand twisted wire, and near 100% original gold wash. The Ames marked blade has the original blade washer and 100% frosted etching, with a great tip. The scabbard is one of the best I have seen with all its mounts and screws, no breaks, little crazing, and better than 95% original black finish. $2300.00

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U687. NON-REGULATION FOOT OFFICERS SWORD: This is a Non-Regulation Foot Officers sword. Let me start by saying the photos do not do this sword justice. This is the way I like to find a sword. The patina is an even deep dark brown on the steel hilt and the scabbard. The blade shows some wear, but retains much original frosting. The guard and grip is tight, and retains 98% original shark-skin. The blade is maker marked W. Walscheid Soligen with the brass prove mark. The scabbard has two small door ding. If you are looking for a nice example with great patina, this is the one. $1150.00

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U689. AMES TYPE-2 M1850 STAFF & FIELD SWORD: This is an earlier version of the Ames M1850 Type-2 Staff & Field sword as is evident by the block etched US on the blade. The hilt is tight with no movement, and retains much original gold was mixed with a deep reddish-brown patina. The shark-skin grip and double strand wire is 100% original. There is no blade washer, but the blade is tight.  Blade length is 32 inches and retains much original frosting with the standard eagle; block etched US and Ames marking. There is some light peppering on the blade, but no rust or pitting.  The type-2 scabbard is complete with all brass fittings and original screws. It is dent free and the brass mounts have the same matching patina as the hilt.  The blue scabbard has taken on a nice rich brown patina. This sword shows evidence of being carried, but was well maintained. $2300.00

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U690. HIGH-GRADE GERMAN SILVER HILT M1850 STAFF & FIELD SWORD WITH PENNSYLVANIA CENTER SCABBARD MOUNT: This is a M1850 Staff & Field Sword with a high-grade shark-skin scabbard with the state seal for Pennsylvania in the middle mount, and a German silver grip. The basket is the large Staff & Field design without the US, which is regulation. It retains much original gold wash, and the grip retains its German silver and triple strand wire. The original red felt washer is 90% complete and keep the blade tight. The blade is marked Collins & Co. Hartford Conn 1862, and is etched 23 1/2 inches on both sides of a 30 inch blade. Etching includes and eagle, crossed flags, and US. There is some light spider-surface pitting, but nothing major. The scabbard is shark-skin with high-end raised ring mounts, with the PA state seal on the middle, and rope rings. This is a very unique sword!  $3300.00    

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