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U375. HIGH-GRADE NON-REGULATION BRITISH PATTERN 1822 CAVALRY OFFICER'S SABER FISH-TAIL POMMEL:  This is a high-grade Non-regulation British pattern 1822 cavalry officer's saber with a gold washed hilt, and gold washed etched blade.  The blade is Clauberg maker marked and "Iron Proof" on the spine, and retains theoriginal blade washer. The hilt is tight and the grip is 100% original shark-skin and triple wire. The scabbard is brown metal with brass mounts.

$2800.00

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U383. RARE HEINISCH BOWIE KNIFE: This is a rare American Bowie knife by the noted American Cutler Rochus Heinisch, of Newark, New Jersey. American Bowie knives are very rare; many times rarer than Sheffield Bowies that dominated the U.S. market place in the early to mid-1800s.  Heinisch Bowie knives are extremely rare; and according to Bill Williamson, all appear to have been made in the 1850's. There are very few known specimens that have surfaced to date.  This being a previously unseen design, and only the second I have handled.

This Bowie knife measures 12 1/4" in overall length with its original scabbard.  The 7 3/8" clip blade x 1 1/16" wide shows period sharpening, and hot stamped, "R. HEINISH". The blade tang extends through a walnut grip with a brass ferrule at the brass cross guard, and a brass pale where the tang is pinned. The entire tire is loose due to shrinkage.  The sheath is original to the knife and is in strong condition with a little shrinkage and the tip missing. On the grip are stamped the initials "J.R.M." however, there is nothing else indicating a units and there are too many soldiers with those initials to make a positive identification.

In the famous William Williamson article on Heinisch Bowies, he states that the name of R. Heinisch can be added to the select little group of American cutlers who made Bowie and fighting type knives of quality.  Here is an opportunity to own a Rare American made Civil War period bowie knife.

$1950.00

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U387.  M1840 CAVALRY OFFICERS' SABER - MINT:  This is a classic M1840 Cavalry Officers' saber in mint condition.  The guillion adornment has a radiating fan near the top edge of the quillion.  The two branches have the expected laurel leaf cast design.  The pommel cap is in the regulation Phrygian helmet pattern. The grip is shark-skin with braded wire. The entire hilt is tight, and generous amounts of original gold wash is still present. The mint-condition frosty blade is held tight by the original leather washer.  The 35 " blade is adorned with an Eagle, "E PLURIBUS UNUM" cross cannons and a large US.  The scabbard is a style seen on Soligen made sabers. It is steel and believed to have been bright when made.  The chased mounts are all brass including the throat, suspension rings and drag. The ring mounts have a center heavy brass band with a scribed line border and are press or friction fit.  The scallop cut drag is the same design as the bands, but secured with a screw.  This is an excellent example of a M1840 Cavalry Officers' saber.

$3500.00

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U470: TIFFANY SWORD, STAFF & FIELD OFFICERS CIVIL WAR SWORD, PRESENTATION GRADE:  This is an absolutely outstanding Tiffany Style Staff & Field with Collins marked blade. It is beautiful. Although there are no other marks, it is most certainly a product constructed by Tiffany that was sold to a dealer/vender for marketing. It has a classic Tiffany style silver grip that is identical to those on Tiffany products and as most are aware, Tiffany used Collins (this is dated 1862) as its main supplier of high quality blades, even on its finest presentation grade swords. The blade is excellent with beautiful etching and the German silver scabbard is adorned with decorative mounts. Mounts and hilt retain almost all of the original gold finish.

$4600.00

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U510. DAHLGREN BOWIE BAYONET KNIFE: This is a Dahlgren Bowie bayonet knife.  Prior to the Civil War, Commander John Dahlgren developed a Bowie-style fighting knife, but in order to get it funded he marketed it as a bayonet for the Navy rifle musket (Plymouth rifle). It is rare to find one that will fit a Plymouth rifle because they had to be tooled to fit, but this one actually fits the rifle I have listed for sale F120.  This knife is all original with its original scabbard. The patina on the brass is even and never cleaned. The lug-nut locking spring is operational, the wood grip is complete, and the blade has a sharp point and never sharpened. The blade is maker marked Ames, Navy inspected and dated 1863.  The inspection markings are very rare because you will see a Navy anchor on both the blade and the back-end of the knife, which indicated it was not only inspected but issued. This makes it a scarce example! The scabbard is complete with no breaks or repairs, and retains all complete mounts.  As mentioned, it fits the Plymouth Rifle I have for sale, but is being sold separately. If both are purchased, I will give a package deal. The Bowie is priced:

$2800.00

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U525. CLAUBERG CAVALRY OFFICERS' SABER – MODEL 1840 DEEP GUARD & KNUCKLEBOW VARIANT:  This is a Clauberg cavalry officers' saber – model 1840 deep guard & knuckle bow variant as shown on pages 140 – 143 in John H. Thillmann’s book {Civil War Cavalry & Artillery Sabers}. These are identified to Clauberg by the unique characteristics attributed to this maker. The hilt is tight; the grip retains 100% original triple strand wire and shark-skin grip, and the leather blade washer keeps the frosty blade tight. The blade has the brass PROVED disk, and is in mint condition with standard etching showing the Eagle and U.S. in the center panel.  The brown field scabbard is also in great condition with no dings or dents and has a great deep brown patina.  Overall, one of the best examples I have seen of this sword in near-mintcondition.

$3000.00

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U542. W. CLAUBERG 1840 CAVALRY OFFICERS' SABER – AMES DESIGN:  One of the most popular Cavalry Officers' sabers during the Civil War was made by Ames, and several foreign manufacturers copied the design for retailers in America. Ames ultimately sued for copy-right infringement and won bringing an end to the importation of the copies.  However as a result, these sabers are almost as rare to find as the Ames version, but valued at a fraction of the cost. This saber is Clauberg made with the flying eagle on the inside of the guard with traces of original gold wash. The grip is 100% original shark-skin with triple wire. The unsharpened Clauberg marked blade is lightly etched with faint original frosting, and US and the spread Eagle in the center panels. The scabbard is one of the better ones I have seen with a bright steel finish and all original brass mounts. An Ames version would be valued $7500-$8900, but here is a chance to own a unique example of a Cavalry Officers' saber well below the cost of the Ames version. 

$2850.00

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U564. M1821 NON-REGULATION FRENCH INFANTRY OFFICERS SWORD:  WOW, what an amazing blade! This is a M1821 Non-Regulation French Infantry Offricers sword, which was imported into the United State and where carried by Infantry and Artillery officers before and during the Civil War. Often you will find these unetched, and if etched, in well-used condition.  This one is in amazing condition with an etched blade that is perfect in all aspects. The hilt has a nice patina, and with the exception of a small piece of leather missing, the grip is perfect.  The metal scabbard is dent free.  No maker or retailer marks.  

$1075.00

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U566. UNUSUAL STYLE IMPORT NON-REGULATION U.S. CAVALRY OFFICER:  This saber is likely made in Solingen for the American Civil War and is considered a Non-Regulation pattern, and is a style seldom encountered. It is a smooth bird’s head shape pommel with an integral back strap. The grip is sharkskin, triple copper wire wrap with the center strand being dragoon twist. The knuckle bow has no slot for a saber knot. There are two cavalry style branches also undecorated. There are two shield shape langets and a flat disk quillon. The blade has the flat spins of the 1840 pattern. The ricasso is short with no markings. The 12.5 inch etched panel is beautifully done with scroll work and an American Eagle under stars and an E. Pluribus Unum ribbon. The reverse has a stand of arms in place of the Eagle. The scabbard body is German Silver. The mounts appear to be silver with heavy gilt.  The top mount is a long, 4.5 inch throat with a banded carry ring with line chased designs. The center mount matches, but smaller in size and the drag has the same chase-work of a line design aroundthe blade and at the top.

$1795.00

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U569.  EMERSON & SILVER M1850 FOOT OFFICERS SWORD: This is an Emerson & Silver M1850 Foot officers’ sword.  The hilt is tight with generous amounts of original gold-wash, original shark-skin grip with triple strain wire, and frosty mint condition blade held tight with the original white-buff leather washer. The etching is truly beautiful, to include the Emerson & Silver marking.  The steel scabbard has developed a nice even brown patina, and ring mounts are serial number stamped 25, but the drag is marked 52 in error, kind of neat in a way.

$1995.00

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U576.  SCHULER, HARTLEY & GRAHAM – MODEL 1860 STAFF OFFICERS SWORD: This is a rare example of French made Civil War Model 1860 Staff Officers sword retailed by Schuler, Hartley & Graham New York.  The 32” diamond shape blade (which is correct) is etched and marked Schuler, Hartley & Graham New York and French maker marked.  The Klingenthal “B” is on the ricasso reserve side, and the counterguard underside is marked “FBD” with a sword piercing helmet (F.Delecour).  The reverse clam shell folding guard is full sized with a plain field, but in the down position because the retention button is frozen.  The plain brown scabbard has all brass mounts with Civil War style top-ring mounts with a plain simple drag.  The hilt retains much original gold wash and has Mother-of-Pear grips, which are in mint condition. Look at John H. Thillmann's book “Civil War Army Sword” page 448 for comparison information. A Civil War Model 1860 Staff & Field sword is rare to find especially is such fine condition, but since the claim shell cannot be placed in the full open position, I have discounted the price accordingly. 

$1900.00

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U579.  AMES - M1840 ARTILLERY SABER: This M1840 Artillery saber is an outstanding example of the early Civil War production when Ames was filling early order, while still using available surplus parts.  The hilt it is the Type-1 design with the recess cavity for the early scabbard, but the blade is for the Type-2 scabbard, which is what this one has. The guard and pommel cap retain 95% original gold was, and the pommel is inspection marks JH, and the guard has three different number stamps; 42, 69, 618. The grip is 100% complete, but shows some wear. The blade is outstanding with its bright original luster, and is Ames marked and inspected US/J.T./1860.  The scabbard is the second design, which is correct for the Civil War produced blade. It is dent free and complete with all mounts and has an even speckle brown patina.  This is an early war dated saber and very rare to find especially in this condition.

$975.00

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U587. M1860 CAVALRY SABER –EMERSON & SILVER 1864: This is a M1860 light Cavalry Saber made by Emerson & Silver, Trenton N.J. It is dated 1864 and inspection marked. The hilt has a nice even patina and retains 100% original leather and twisted wire. The original blade washer holds the blade tight. It has a few dark spots with grayish patina, but no rust. The original scabbard has post-Civil War plating, which was common during the Indian War period. Free Shipping at this price.  

$775.00

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U588.  SAUERBIER M1850 STAFF & FIELD SWORD: Sometimes, I find a sword which is unique in many ways and gets me excited.  This is such a sword!  It might not be minty and bright, or shiny as many high-end pieces, but this has the age and wear that truly indicated it was carried in battle.  It is an unmarked Sauerbier M1850 Staff & Field sword in a Roby Staff & Field scabbard. Was it originally purchased in this configuration, or did the officer obtain a field replacement.  One will never know, but the patina on the brass matches on the sword and scabbard, and the fit is perfect.  As far as I am concern, it is all original to the war.  The pommel cap, and screw, and blade match Sauerbier designs. The grip retains 100% original shark-skin material, but is missing all but one strand of wire. The blade washer is gone, but the blade is tight. The blade is tired, but you can still see the original etching.  Also, the blade show original period sharpening. The scabbard retains all original mounts and screws and wood liners, and has great patina.  Oh, if this sword could only speak…I hear the faint sounds of battles in Virginia, Pennsylvania, maybe Shiloh or the march to the sea.  This sword will display well in any collection. Free shipping.

$1050.00

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U590.  SILVER HILT – M1850 FOOT OFFICERS / STAFF & FIELD SWORD – INFANTRY: This sword is often mistakenly identified as a Foot Officers sword, but in fact is a M1850 Staff & Field sword because the slightly larger and curved back basket guard. This particular design does not have a US in the guard and many dealers refer to it as Non-regulation, but it does conform to the Civil War sword guidelines.  Also, this sword is slightly rare for two reasons; first it has a German silver hilt, and secondly it is marked with a rare and little known retailer; O. LANGSDORF.  I searched all my referenced and could not find any information associated with this retailer, and intially the only thing I found was a past auction for another sword with the same marking O. LANGSDORF stamped in the blade, the guard and the drag. I was contacted by a respected collector who owns a musket with the same markings. He was able to track down some information on Otto Langsdore from Brooklyn and delt in surplus Civil War weapons for retail to military style units in New York after the war.  Neat!

The blade is not pitted, but does have a few nicks. Also, notice the blunt tip, it looks original as if it never had a sharp point, but I suspect that is post-war. Again, this is a first!  The scabbard is original to the sword and very strong with a period repair of brass above the drag. The top mount is marked Me 13, to which the meaning is unknown. The rings on each mount are original and very small in design, and the original drag has been place upside down as a result of the brass band repair. This is a great looking sword, which displays well, and how often can you find a Silver hilt at this price?

 $925.00

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U606. HIGH-GRADE STAFF & FIELD SWORD – BAILEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA: This is an amazing sword, and one that will be a center piece in any collection. In fact, this sword is featured on the cover of John H. Thillmann’s second sword book Civil War Army Sword and is the exact sword described on page 287-289. Bailey & Co., supplied high-quality swords and this presentation-grade sword has very fine lines and an extremely handsome appearance. The grip is sterling silver cast and chased to look and feel like shark-skin. The pommel cap is ornate with a standing eagle on top; the Damascus blade is Clauberg maker marked and retailer marked Bailey & Co, and had amazing etching to include a battle field scene, and the scabbard has ornate mounts that retain much original gold wash. If you have John’s book please look at his description.  When this sword was first released for sale it was priced at $16,500.00; however, it is available at a much reduced price.

$9995.00

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U616. HORSTMANN M1852 NAVAL OFFICERS SWORD: This is a Horstmann M1852 Naval Offices sword.  It retains 100% of its original gold wash on the hilt and all scabbard mounts. The original white shark-skin grip is perfict with all original triple-strand wire. The red felt blade washer is complete and in great condition, and it holds the blade tight. The blade is marked with the Gebruder Weyersberg king’s head and the W. H. Horstmann & Sons Philadelphia mark etched in the blade. The etching is strong and much original frosting is present, but there is some black spotting in the blade. The black leather scabbard is complete with all original mounts and screws. I have seen similar examples selling in the $2200-$2500 range, but I have priced this below those prices.

$1800.00

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U618. SAUERBIER NON-REG. ARTILLERY STAFF OFFICERS SWORD: This Sauerbier pattern has a relatively small, half basket guard with foliate decoration basket and knuckle-bow. The pommel has additional scroll work on the crown rim. The quillon is decorated as is a small reverse counter guard. The curved blade has an unstopped fuller and a secondary fuller starting 15 inches from the guard. The etching is scroll work on the obverse and the Sauerbier address: H. Sauerbier / Newark / NJ, scroll work and a large U.S., on the reverse. The maker mark is fain, but readable, and the remaining etching is strong. Iron Proof is on the spine of the blade. The curved blade is identical to a known mounted officer example with a leather scabbard with brass mounts; however, this example has a steal scabbard with steal mounts, a steel throat piece, and a brass drag making it an artillery officer’s sword. A rare find!

$2600.00

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U620. AMERICAN ETCHED (WAR OF 1812): - ENGLISH P-1796 LIGHT CAVALRY OFFICERS' SABER: In 1796 the British War Department adopted a newly designed saber for use by the Light Cavalry based upon John Gaspard Le Merchant military experiences in the field. Le Merchant saw the inadequacies in the British cavalry saber design while he was serving as a brigade major with the British Cavalry in Flanders, during the Low Countries campaign in the early years of the French Revolutionary Wars (1793-1795). Upon returning to England, he enlisted the aid of English cutler and sword maker Henry Osborn and between them was born the Pattern 1796 Light Cavalry Saber. The saber had a curved blade with relatively short slashing tip, referred to as a “hatchet” tip. The blade was typically between 32 ½” and 33” long and had a simple stirrup shaped iron guard with languets on either side of the guard. The grip had a grooved wood core wrapped with braided cord and then wrapped with leather. A pair of iron ears extended from the back-strap on either side of the grip’s center, and a transverse pin reinforced the grip to the back-strap attachment; strengthening it and keeping the grip from wobbling or working itself loose from the hilt. The design was strictly for hacking and slashing, and not for thrusting designed as a standard fighting saber for the use of the light cavalry troopers and no “officers” pattern were made. While the British War Department often created specific, official “officers’” pattern swords for wear with dress uniforms, etc. no specific officers’ light cavalry saber was authorized or codified. As such, a variety of enhanced variants of the Pattern 1796 Light Cavalry Saber were produced for use and wear by officers. Some were little more than lightened versions of the trooper saber with wire wrap on the grip and some level of ornamentation on the blade, varying from simple acid etching to fire blued blades with gold gilt decorations. Heavily ornamented hilts were available as well. The popularity of Le Merchant’s design is also seen in the number of American sabers (often called “Bird’s Head” pommels) that are known from the era of the late 1790s through the early 1820s, often utilizing the same stirrup guard (often called “D” or “P” guards) in both brass and iron. The form seems to have been quite popular with mounted American militia officers during the Federal Era, and variants are known with connection to infantry, cavalry and artillery officers. As many American swords and sabers in the post-Revolutionary War through pre-War of 1812 era originated with the cutlers and swords makers in England, it is not surprising that current British military patterns were frequently imported by American retailers. Some American retailers acquired only their blades from England and hilted the swords themselves, but other retailers purchased completed swords from the English for sale in America.

This is a wonderful example of a British Pattern 1796 Light Cavalry Officers’ Sword that was clearly intended for the American market. The saber appears to be a slightly lighter version of the common trooper’s saber with the exception that the grip has no reinforcing ears, and the leather-covered grip has an additional wire wrap. However, when the blade is drawn from the iron scabbard, the acid etched blade with American military motifs is immediately apparent. Approximately 15” of the 29 ½” long curved blade is etched with a variety of martial images. The obverse starts with floral splays and an arched bridge near the ricasso, with the word WARRENTED etched over the bridge. This is followed by a martial panoply of drums, canons, flags and pole arms, with the central pole arm being tipped with the “liberty cap”. Next is another floral splay that is topped with a spread-winged American eagle. The eagle clutches the usual olive branch in it left talon and 3 arrows in its right, and has a banner bearing the de facto motto of the United States E. Pluribus Unum (out of many, one), secured in its beak. The breast of the eagle is an American flag shield with 11 vertical stripes on the lower portion and 16 stars on the upper portion. The number of stars is interesting; suggesting the saber dates to between 1796 and 1803, although it could date as late as 1820. In 1796 Tennessee entered the union as the 16th state, the first since the adoption of the 15-star flag in 1795. The 17th state, Ohio, entered the union in 1803, and was followed by Louisiana (#18) in 1812, Indiana (#19) in 1816 and Mississippi (#20) in 1817. However, the 15-star flag remained the official American flag until 1820, when it was replaced with a new 20-star flag. This does not mean that flags with different star counts were not used during the time, and for a period a 16-star and 16-stripe flag was used unofficially, circa 1797-1803. Above the American eagle is another floral splay. The reverse of the saber starts with the same style of floral decoration and arched bridge near the ricasso, and continued with floral splays up the blade. The central image is another martial panoply featuring a drum, a canon, pole arms (with the central one again tipped with a “Liberty Cap”) and a shield with an American flag motif. Again the shield has 11-vertical stripes on the lower portion and 16-stars on the upper portion. Above the martial display is another floral splay. The curved blade is 29 ½” in length and 1 1/8” wide at the ricasso and the spine is a ¼” wide at that location as well. A single, wide fuller extends from the ricasso approximately 21 ½” towards the tip of the saber. The stirrup hilt and back strap are of iron, as they would be for any but the highest end English P-1796 officer’s saber. The hilt is 4 ½” long and the overall length of the saber is about 34 ½”. The rear of the guard is slotted for a saber knot and a pair of 15/16” long iron languets, the same width as the blade, extend form the front of the guard. The top of the guard extends 1 ½” above the blade and is tipped with a flat, round quillon. The wooden grip is grooved with an obvious palm-swell and covered in thin dark brown leather. Seven wraps of bronze or copper wire are present in the grooves. The wire has a wound center strand, flanked by two plain strands of wire, quite similar to the wire found on US Model 1833 Dragoon sabers. Interestingly the 1833 Dragoon was based upon the replacement for the Pattern 1796 saber, the Pattern 1821 saber. Other than the word “WARRENTED” no other identifying mark can be found on the saber other than a very tiny letter stamped on the spine, which may be a “C” or “G”. If it is a “G”, it may suggest Thomas Gill made the saber for the American market. The saber is in about FINE overall condition. The frosted etching on both sides of the blade is very clear and crisp and is about 90%+ present. The highly polished blade retains about 85%+ of its original bright polish as well. The etched panels show only some minor discoloration from freckled surface oxidation and some scattered flecks of discoloration. The last 8” of the blade, from the end of the fuller to the tip has been very lightly cleaned, and some minor surface scratches are visible in the polished steel. The blade is free of any significant dings or nicks, but a few tiny impact marks can be felt along the cutting edge if you carefully run your thumb along it. This is typical of any old sword that probably saw some light use, and then some additional action as a family heirloom "toy" reenacting the deeds of grandpa or great-grandpa. The iron stirrup hilt and back strap have an untouched mottled gray and brown patina with a mostly dark brown even coloration along the back strap, and some small areas of scattered minor surface oxidation scattered over the hilt. The leather wrap is original and is about 80%+ present, with largest single area of loss being at the obverse rear of the grip, where it has flaked away and another piece of leather has lifted and may flake off soon as well. The other areas of loss are some small wear spots on the reverse of the grip. The wire all appears to be original, and remains relatively tight and secure, with only some minor looseness noted at the obverse rear where the leather wrap has started to flake. The saber is accompanied by its original iron scabbard, and fits it perfectly. The scabbard retains both original iron suspension rings and is complete, including its throat. The scabbard was painted black a very long time ago, possibly during the period of use or immediately thereafter as a means of protecting a family heirloom. The scabbard was then decorated on the obverse with gold paint in a floral motif between the mounts. Only about 30%-40% of this paint remains, having worn off the scabbard from handling, storage and use over the years. The scabbard remains solid with the only condition issues worth noting being a tiny seam crack, about ½” long, 3 ¼” below the lower drag, and pair of deep dents between the mounts on the reverse. The upper dent is the deeper and larger of the two. A smaller, thumb-sized dent is also present on the obverse just below the upper mount. The scabbard matches the saber well and the old painted decorations really add to the overall eye appeal of the saber.

While it is impossible to know the exact date of manufacture and the exact period of use of this sword, it is almost certainly c1800 and most likely pre-War of 1812. The number of stars in the etched panels and the overall pattern are typical of earlier, rather than later Federal Era officer’s swords, which tend to be more heavily embellished. This sword, with its relatively short 29 ½” blade was almost certainly an infantry officer’s or artillery officer’s saber and the iron scabbard suggest use while mounted. This is a very attractive sword with a wonderful blade and lovely etching. It would be a wonderful addition to any collection of early American swords. This is a scarce pattern, and I have only seen a handful of these English P-1796 officer type swords etched with American martial motifs. It is a sword you will no doubt be very glad to add to your collection and to display on your wall.

$1895.00

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U623. HIGH-GRADE, SILVER HILT NON-REGULATION SWORD: One of my favorite sword designs is the Non-regulation officer’s swords because of the wide variety that exist. This is a plain two-guard hilt similar to a Cavalry style, but not Calvary because of the blade. This sword is in near-mint condition, which makes it a challenge to photograph. The hilt is silver-plated, has 100% original shark-skin grip and wire, and is tight. The blade is bright with frosted panels, and is so bright you can see the camera and my arm in the reflection. Sorry about that!  The scabbard is original German silver with a steel drag. I believe this style sword most likely was carried by a mounted artillery officers. It is a great find and will be a great addition to any sword collection.

$1400.00

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U624.NON-REGULATION FOOT OFFICERS SWORD: Next to the standard M1850 Foot Officers sword, the Non-Regulation Foot Officer sword is the most common sword carried by company grade officers (Lieutenants and Captains) during the Civil War. To coin the phrase: they are a dime a dozen. However, it is one of my favorite swords and I love finding them. This sword definitely saw the elephant and shows wear, but not abuse. The steel metal hilt and back-strap have an untouched brown patina, which matches the scabbard. The grip retains 100% original sharkskin, but is missing some original wire. The blade is rust free with dark areas, but has all original etched, which is faint is some areas, and is Solingen marked. The scabbard is original with a door ding half way between the drag and bottom mount. I am going to offer free shipping with this sword. $575.00

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U625.  AMES M1850 FOOT OFFICERS SWORD, 1861 DATES AND INSPECTED: This is one of only 425 dated and inspected Ames M1850 Foot Officers sword. The sword is in mint condition with 100% gold wash, and the scabbard mounts also have 100% gold wash, but the scabbard leather has some leather lose and crazing; but still solid. Since the gold and frosted blade is bright, it is difficult to photo without a reflection; however, you can see it is an outstanding sword.  $4100.00

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U627. M1850 FOOT OFFICERS SWORD by P. (PHILLIP) H. TUSKA: This M1850 Foot Officer sword has in the past be misidentified as being a Tomes product, but has recently been id'ed as being retailed by P. (Phillip) H. Tuska. Tuska was a military outfitter in New York, NY and only in business 2-years, 1861-1863, making this a true Civil War sword. All his swords have identical features to include a black leather grip with triple-wire; “T” marked blade; a large eagle with a turned down beak and upwarded turned wings; and US vertical to the blade. The scabbard leather body is similar to that made by Ames and Roby. The hilt on this sword is tight with 100% original leather and wire. The white leather washer keeps the 31 inch blade tight. The blade retains light original frosting and is deeply etched.  The scabbard fits tight with all original mounts and screws and is solid, but has some minor leather lose and crazing.

$1500.00

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U628. HORSTMANN PATTERN 1822 CAVALRY OFFICERS SABER: This is a Horstmann pattern M1822 Cavalry officers saber in “MINT” condition.  I doubt there is a better example on the market. The steel hilt has beautiful patina and is tight with 100% original shark-skin wrap and wire. It also retain the original leather finger loop on the inside guard. The red blade washer holds the frosty blade tight. The blade is flawless with outstanding etching, and marked with the Gebruder Weyersberg king’s head and the Horstmann & Sons Philadelphia mark. The scabbard is dent free and has great original brown patina. This will be hard to improve upon.

$1900.00

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U629. M1852 NAVAL OFFICERS SWORD: This is a Civil War period M1852 Naval Officers sword by Friedrick Plucker Jr., Solingen Germany. His Rabbit Head mark can be seen on the blade. The sword is complete and all original, shows period use, but not abuse. The hilt is tight and retains 100% shark-skin grip and triple-strand wire. There is a little shrinkage on the left-hand side of the grip. The 29 x 1 inch wide blade is fully etched, unsharpened, has a strong tip, and some light pitting at the last 4 inches. The etching is deep and crisp with the naval anchor, eagle, USN, and other military symbols. The scabbard is complete and original with no breaks or weak spots. The brass mounts are very heavy and retain original retention screws. M1852 Naval Officers Sword are not as common as M1850 Foot Officers swords, and especially one for Friedrick Plucker Jr.

$1200.00    

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U630. SCHUYLER, HARTLEY & GRAHAM – M1850 FOOT OFFICERS SWORD: Schuyler, Hartley & Graham, NY were assembles and retailers of military supplies and the swords they sold were often high quality and high end.  This M1850 Foot Officer sword fits in that category. The hilt retains much original gold was, has 100% original shark-skin grip and triple stand wire, and detailed chase work on the pommel and guard.  They were known for having a wider blade, and a mirror finish, as this sword has. The etching is strong with much original frosting, and just a few dark spots. The leather scabbard is complete with all original brass fittings complete with original screws.

 $2300.00

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U633.  HIGH-QUALITY PRESENTATION GRADE STAFF & FIELD SWORD:  As the end of the Civil War approached, more and more manufacturers produced high-quality presentation grade swords as awards and for ceremonial wear. This is one such sword with a heavy brass guard, brass grip with Lady Columbia on one side and a brass US on the other in a high-grade scabbard.  The blade is Clauberg Solingen maker mark and lightly etched like an Emerson & Silver blade with a spread eagle on one side and US on the other. The blade has a light gray patina with much original frosting. The scabbard is shark-skin covered leather with ornate mounts.  This is an amazing sword!  

$7500.00

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U635. SAUERBIER TYPE 3 CAVARLY OFFICER SABER, 2ND VARIATION: This is a Sauerbier Type 3 Cavalry Officers saber, 2nd Variation.  It is an ornate saber with a German silver spiral grip with triple-stand brass wire. It has a deeply cast pommel cap with two mother or pearl inlays, a Union shield on top and a large cameo of George Washington on the back side. Both inlays are in perfect condition with no blemishes. The triple branch guard retains much of the original gold wash. The bright blade is held tight by the original scalloped leather washer. The etching is simple outstanding with much original frosting, no rust.  The scabbard design is truly magnificent and among the best of Sauerbier’s work. Steel body of the scabbard has a great brown patina and all the fancy mounts retain much original gold wash and all original screws.  The back side of the ring mounts has two heart designs whereas the back of the drag has an open shield design.  

$8000.00

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U640.  PATTERN 1821 ENLISTED CAVALRY SABER: This is a pattern 1821 enlisted cavalry saber. This example is totally void of foreign marks and was imported into the United States and used by many state militia both north and south of the Mason Dixon line.  This is the saber that would have seen action in many conflicts between 1821 and 1865 to include: Texas war on Independence, Texas-Indian wars, Black Hawk War, Mexican & American War, and the Civil War as well as many smaller engagements. This saber is in great condition and has been well cared for over the years. The steel hilt has a deep plum-brown patina, is tight, and retains 100% original leather and retains all the main strand of original wire. The blade is nick free and has a great uncleaned patina with some areas of dark spots, but no rust or pitting; and the scabbard is dent free, and also has the same matching patina. This sword has been properly cared for over the years account for its excellent condition.

$750.00

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U641.  SILVER HILT - M1850 FOOT OFFICERS SWORD: This German silver hilt Model1850 Foot Officers is the mount officers version because it is in a metal scabbard. It is marked W. H. HORSTMANN & SONS PHILIDELPHIA and IRON PROOF on spine of the blade. The hilt retains 100% original gold wash, has a German silver grip with all original triple wire. The 31 inch blade is etched in the standard pattern of the period with US and the American eagle on their respective sides, and is frosty with a mirror finish. There is some dark spotting, so it is not mint condition. The original red felt washer is present, but has darkened with age. The scabbard fits like a glove, and the outline of the throat-piece matches the contact area on the guard. The scabbard has a steel body with brass mounts, and a few minor dings.

$1900.00

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