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U310.  RARE HEINISCH BOWIE KNIFE: This is a rare American Bowie knife by the noted American Cutler Rochus Heinisch, of Newark, New Jersey. American Bowie knives are very rare; many times rarer than Sheffield Bowies that dominated the U.S. market place in the early to mid-1800s. Heinisch Bowie knives are extremely rare; and according to Bill Williamson, all appear to have been made in the 1850's. There are very few known specimens that have surfaced to date. This Bowie knife measures 13 1/2" in overall length, and is a handful of Knife; a heavy, full sized Bowie weighing nearly a pound (15 oz.). The 8" clip blade x 1 1/16" wide x from 3/32" thick stock has a 4 1/8" false edge on top, with the ricasso being hot stamped, "R. HEINISH". The blade tang extends through the end of the hilt and is capped off with a threaded brass nut. The blade has been period sharpening, and retains its original blade shape with a full tip. There are no nicks to the blade when running your finger over the edge. There are a few areas of light black spots on the blade, as can be expected, but overall; the blade is in excellent condition. The 3 5/8" wide integral S shaped cross guard and ferrule, as well as the 5 3/8" long birds head hilt, are made from separate Iron castings, and the cross guard and hilt are tight and rigid. The hilt is incised with dozens of lozenge shaped indentation's that appear to have been ground into the hilt to help with the grip of this heavy Bowie, and slightly lighten it. There are good traces of the original black Japanning inside these incisions. This knife was located in California, which accounts for the scabbard.  It is not original to the knife, but is a 19th century scabbard for a California knife.  A nearly identical Heinisch Bowie knife with a 12 5/8" blade and brass mounted sheath sold in an April 2006 auction for $9,080 (around $10K including buyer's premium, tax (S/H).

In the famous William R. Williamson article on Heinisch Bowies, he states that the name of R. Heinisch can be added to the select little group of American cutlers who made Bowie and fighting type knives of quality. He writes about Rochus Heinisch, Jr. (son of New Jersey cutler Rochus Heinisch Sr.) who was a Lieutenant in Company A of the Union forces during the U.S. Civil War. As an officer of the 26th Regiment of New Jersey Infantry Volunteers, he was involved in a charge of Confederate forces by crossing the Rappahannock River, 3 miles south of the town of Fredericksburg, Virginia, on June 5th, 1863. A copy of this article from the Gun Report in 1972 will be provided to the purchaser of this Bowie knife. Here is an opportunity to own a Rare American made Civil War period bowie knife. A nearly identical Heinisch Bowie knife with a 12 5/8" blade and brass mounted sheath sold in an April 2006 auction for $9,080, and currently there is an identical one available on N, Flayderman INC for $8200.00, which shows how rare a Bowie Knife it truly is!  This is available for much less and a GREAT buy!!   $6000.00 SALE PRICE $3500.00

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U375. HIGH-GRADE NON-REGULATION BRITISH PATTERN 1822 CAVALRY OFFICER'S SABER FISH-TAIL POMMEL:  This is a high-grade Non-regulation British pattern 1822 cavalry officer's saber with a gold washed hilt, and gold washed etched blade.  The blade is Clauberg maker marked and "Iron Proof" on the spine, and retains theoriginal blade washer. The hilt is tight and the grip is 100% original shark-skin and triple wire. The scabbard is brown metal with brass mounts.$2700.00

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U383. RARE HEINISCH BOWIE KNIFE: This is a rare American Bowie knife by the noted American Cutler Rochus Heinisch, of Newark, New Jersey. American Bowie knives are very rare; many times rarer than Sheffield Bowies that dominated the U.S. market place in the early to mid-1800s.  Heinisch Bowie knives are extremely rare; and according to Bill Williamson, all appear to have been made in the 1850's. There are very few known specimens that have surfaced to date.  This being a previously unseen design, and only the second I have handled.

This Bowie knife measures 12 1/4" in overall length with its original scabbard.  The 7 3/8" clip blade x 1 1/16" wide shows period sharpening, and hot stamped, "R. HEINISH". The blade tang extends through a walnut grip with a brass ferrule at the brass cross guard, and a brass pale where the tang is pinned. The tang is loose due to shrinkage.  The sheath is original to the knife with a little shrinkage and the tip missing. On the grip are stamped the initials "J.R.M." however, there is nothing else indicating a units and there are too many soldiers with those initials to make a positive identification. In the famous William Williamson article on Heinisch Bowies, he states that the name of R. Heinisch can be added to the select little group of American cutlers who made Bowie and fighting type knives of quality.  Here is an opportunity to own a Rare American made Civil War period bowie knife. $1700.00

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U387.  M1840 CAVALRY OFFICERS' SABER:  This is a classic M1840 Cavalry Officers' saber in mint condition.  The quillion adornment has a radiating fan near the top edge, the two branches have a laurel leaf cast design, and the pommel cap has the regulation Phrygian helmet pattern. The grip is shark-skin with braded wire. The hilt is tight and retains generous amounts of original gold wash, and the mint frosty blade is held tight by the original leather washer. The 35 " blade is adorned with an Eagle, "E PLURIBUS UNUM," cross cannons, and a large US. The scabbard throat, suspension rings and drag are high-quality brass, and the ring mounts have a heavy brass center band with a raised-line border and are friction fitted.  The scallop cut drag is the same design as the bands, but secured with a screw.  This is an excellent example of a M1840 Cavalry Officers' saber.$2900.00

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U470: TIFFANY SWORD, STAFF & FIELD OFFICERS CIVIL WAR SWORD, PRESENTATION GRADE:  This is an absolutely outstanding Tiffany Style Staff & Field with Collins marked blade. It is beautiful. Although there are no other marks, it is most certainly a product constructed by Tiffany that was sold to a dealer/vender for marketing. It has a classic Tiffany style silver grip that is identical to those on Tiffany products and as most are aware, Tiffany used Collins (this is dated 1862) as its main supplier of high quality blades, even on its finest presentation grade swords. The blade is excellent with beautiful etching and the German silver scabbard is adorned with decorative mounts. Mounts and hilt retain almost all of the original gold finish.$4750.00

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U566. UNUSUAL STYLE IMPORT NON-REGULATION U.S. CAVALRY OFFICER:  This saber is likely made in Solingen for the American Civil War and is considered a Non-Regulation pattern, and is a style seldom encountered. It is a smooth bird’s head shape pommel with an integral back strap. The grip is sharkskin, triple copper wire wrap with the center strand being dragoon twist. The knuckle bow has no slot for a saber knot. There are two cavalry style branches also undecorated. There are two shield shape langets and a flat disk quillon. The blade has the flat spins of the 1840 pattern. The ricasso is short with no markings. The 12.5 inch etched panel is beautifully done with scroll work and an American Eagle under stars and an E. Pluribus Unum ribbon. The reverse has a stand of arms in place of the Eagle. The scabbard body is German Silver. The mounts appear to be silver with heavy gilt.  The top mount is a long, 4.5 inch throat with a banded carry ring with line chased designs. The center mount matches, but smaller in size and the drag has the same chase-work of a line design aroundthe blade and at the top.$1900.00

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U569.  EMERSON & SILVER M1850 FOOT OFFICERS SWORD: This is an Emerson & Silver M1850 Foot officers’ sword.  The hilt is tight with generous amounts of original gold-wash, original shark-skin grip with triple strain wire, and frosty mint condition blade held tight with the original white-buff leather washer. The etching is truly beautiful, to include the Emerson & Silver marking.  The steel scabbard has developed a nice even brown patina, and ring mounts are serial number stamped 25, but the drag is marked 52 in error, kind of neat in a way. $1900.00

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U582. HIGH-GRADE PRESENTATION SWORD with ORNATE MEDALLION MOUNTS & SILVER SCABBARD:  This is a high-grade Civil War period sword with a post-war presentation.  The sword is most likely a Clauberg product with a PDL marked blade.  It has a fancy eagle pommel hilt with US in the basket, a German silver grip, and a great pommel. The blade is PDL marked, and shows wear, but all the etching is present, as well as the leather blade washer. The scabbard is outstanding! It is silver plated steel with ornate medallion mounts and a drag with a standing soldier. On the top mount is the presentation “Presented to Capt. E. W. Holden by the Members of Company H. 10 Regt M. V. M.” Massachusetts Volunteer Militia.

E. W. Holder (Ethan W. Holden) was from Westminster, MA. He Enlisted as a Private on 10/01/1861 as a member of Company F, 25th Massachusetts Infantry and was discharged for disability on 7/24/1862 at New Berne, NC. After the war he was a member of GAR Post #69 (Joseph P. Rice) in Westminster, MA as the Post Commander. He also was a member of the post-war 10th Regiment.  Records show he received a pension, and muster sheets are on file, though more research is required. The hilt and scabbard are outstanding, but the blade is a little tired, and if it were better this would be a $5500 sword.  $3800.00 SALE PRICE $3500.00

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U587. M1860 CAVALRY SABER –EMERSON & SILVER 1864: This is a M1860 light Cavalry Saber made by Emerson & Silver, Trenton N.J. It is dated 1864 and inspection marked. The hilt has a nice even patina and retains 100% original leather and twisted wire, and the original blade washer holds the blade tight. It has a few dark spots with grayish patina, but no rust. The original scabbard has post-Civil War plating, which was common during the Indian War period. $775.00

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U615. SAUERBIER TYPE-3 CAVALRY OFFICER SABER, 1ST VARIATION: This Sauerbier Type-3 Cavalry Officer Saber, 1st Variation is a great example of the quality work Sauerbier produced. The large guard is designed with multiple branches that split into 5 sections. The grip is 100% original black leather with triple-strand wire. The original scallop-cut blade washer holds the 32 1/2 inch blade tight. The blade is free of pitting or rust, but has some dark areas with period sharpening and some very small service nicks. The etching is strong with the Sauerbier maker mark and a large blocked U. S. The scabbard is brown metal to include the flame style throat, large chased ring mounts, and a heavy fancy drag unique to this maker. Sauerbier swords are simple a work of art, and a must for any Civil War edge weapon collector. $3100.00

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U617.  M1840 CAVALRY OFFICERS' SABER:  This is a classic M1840 Cavalry Officers' saber which shows light wear, but is in great condition. The quillion adornment has a radiating fan near the top edge, the two branches have a laurel leaf cast design, and the pommel cap has the regulation Phrygian helmet pattern. The grip is shark-skin with triple wire. The hilt is tight with generous amounts of original gold wash. The frosty blade is held tight by the original leather washer and shows light period sharpening.  The 35 " blade is adorned with an Eagle, "E PLURIBUS UNUM" a large US and Eagle.The scabbard throat, suspension rings and drag are high-quality brass, and the ring mounts have a heavy brass center band with a raised-line border and are friction fitted. The drag shows light wear.  This is an excellent example of a M1840 Cavalry Officers' saber. $2800.00

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U619. M1852 NAVAL OFFICERS SWORD – BOATSWAIN JOHN A. FLOYD: This Model 1852 Naval Officers sword is identified to Boatswain John A. Floyd. The sword is not maker marked, but might be an Ames product; however, it is marked by the retailer A. W. Pollard & CO. Boston, MA.  The hilt retains much of the original gold wash and it tight, and on the outside guard is etched JOHN A FLOYD.  The grip material, which is original, is unusual in that it is a fine brass mesh material with twisted brass wire. The scabbard is missing the drag, and the back seam is open below the second mount. Both mounts retain 100% original gold was and have the retention screw. The top mount has JOHN A FLOYD etched on the back side.

John Adams Floyd was born in Boston November 26, 1826 and a resident of Abington, Massachusetts, and died May 13, 1894 at the age of sixty-eight.

He enlisted in the Navy April 18, 1838 as a Landsman for three years, and served on the USS Columbus (Date of Enlistment - May 26, 1838) and on the USS Cyane (May 27, 1838 – May 29,1842) until discharged.  However, he did not stay out long and would shortly reenlist, but under the alias Charles Smith. The reason for the name change is unknown.

On April 19, 1843 he reentered the navy as a Seaman and was assigned to the receiving ship, USS Pennsylvania (Date of Enlistment – May 22, 1843). He would then be assigned to the USS Macedonia (May 23, 1843 – May 10, 1845), when he was discharged. He would again reenlist as Charles Smith on October 13, 1846 as a Seaman for the “Cruise” and serves on the USS Vincennes (Date of Enlistment – April 13, 1847).

On May 16, 1862, Floyd would again enlisted in the Navy for the Civil War serving on the USS North Carolina (May 16, 1862 – June 30, 1862); the USS Adirondack (July 1, 1862 – September 7, 1862) up until it sank; and the USS Conemaugh as a Chief Boatswain’s Mate (September 8, 1862 – December 16, 1864) until his discharge and promotion. On December 22, 1864 he would promote as an officer to Acting Boatswain and be assigned to the USS Richmond for the remainder of the war until mustered out on August 15, 1865.  Boatswain Floyd was on the USS Richmond and present with Farragut's fleet. He was recognized for his bravery while leading a rescue party to save crew members from a stranded ship on the sand bar in Mobile Bay.

I have had this sword for over a year while looking for a replacement drag. If you have one for sale, I will buy it. Complete military record with 199 pages of historical documentation included with  the sword.$2300.00

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U620. AMERICAN ETCHED (WAR OF 1812): - ENGLISH P-1796 LIGHT CAVALRY OFFICERS' SABER: In 1796 the British War Department adopted a newly designed saber for use by the Light Cavalry based upon John Gaspard Le Merchant military experiences in the field. Le Merchant saw the inadequacies in the British cavalry saber design while he was serving as a brigade major with the British Cavalry in Flanders, during the Low Countries campaign in the early years of the French Revolutionary Wars (1793-1795). Upon returning to England, he enlisted the aid of English cutler and sword maker Henry Osborn and between them was born the Pattern 1796 Light Cavalry Saber. The saber had a curved blade with relatively short slashing tip, referred to as a “hatchet” tip. The blade was typically between 32 ½” and 33” long and had a simple stirrup shaped iron guard with languets on either side of the guard. The grip had a grooved wood core wrapped with braided cord and then wrapped with leather. A pair of iron ears extended from the back-strap on either side of the grip’s center, and a transverse pin reinforced the grip to the back-strap attachment; strengthening it and keeping the grip from wobbling or working itself loose from the hilt. The design was strictly for hacking and slashing, and not for thrusting designed as a standard fighting saber for the use of the light cavalry troopers and no “officers” pattern were made. While the British War Department often created specific, official “officers’” pattern swords for wear with dress uniforms, etc. no specific officers’ light cavalry saber was authorized or codified. As such, a variety of enhanced variants of the Pattern 1796 Light Cavalry Saber were produced for use and wear by officers. Some were little more than lightened versions of the trooper saber with wire wrap on the grip and some level of ornamentation on the blade, varying from simple acid etching to fire blued blades with gold gilt decorations. Heavily ornamented hilts were available as well. The popularity of Le Merchant’s design is also seen in the number of American sabers (often called “Bird’s Head” pommels) that are known from the era of the late 1790s through the early 1820s, often utilizing the same stirrup guard (often called “D” or “P” guards) in both brass and iron. The form seems to have been quite popular with mounted American militia officers during the Federal Era, and variants are known with connection to infantry, cavalry and artillery officers. As many American swords and sabers in the post-Revolutionary War through pre-War of 1812 era originated with the cutlers and swords makers in England, it is not surprising that current British military patterns were frequently imported by American retailers. Some American retailers acquired only their blades from England and hilted the swords themselves, but other retailers purchased completed swords from the English for sale in America.

This is a wonderful example of a British Pattern 1796 Light Cavalry Officers’ Sword that was clearly intended for the American market. The saber appears to be a slightly lighter version of the common trooper’s saber with the exception that the grip has no reinforcing ears, and the leather-covered grip has an additional wire wrap. However, when the blade is drawn from the iron scabbard, the acid etched blade with American military motifs is immediately apparent. Approximately 15” of the 29 ½” long curved blade is etched with a variety of martial images. The obverse starts with floral splays and an arched bridge near the ricasso, with the word WARRENTED etched over the bridge. This is followed by a martial panoply of drums, canons, flags and pole arms, with the central pole arm being tipped with the “liberty cap”. Next is another floral splay that is topped with a spread-winged American eagle. The eagle clutches the usual olive branch in it left talon and 3 arrows in its right, and has a banner bearing the de facto motto of the United States E. Pluribus Unum (out of many, one), secured in its beak. The breast of the eagle is an American flag shield with 11 vertical stripes on the lower portion and 16 stars on the upper portion. The number of stars is interesting; suggesting the saber dates to between 1796 and 1803, although it could date as late as 1820. In 1796 Tennessee entered the union as the 16th state, the first since the adoption of the 15-star flag in 1795. The 17th state, Ohio, entered the union in 1803, and was followed by Louisiana (#18) in 1812, Indiana (#19) in 1816 and Mississippi (#20) in 1817. However, the 15-star flag remained the official American flag until 1820, when it was replaced with a new 20-star flag. This does not mean that flags with different star counts were not used during the time, and for a period a 16-star and 16-stripe flag was used unofficially, circa 1797-1803. Above the American eagle is another floral splay. The reverse of the saber starts with the same style of floral decoration and arched bridge near the ricasso, and continued with floral splays up the blade. The central image is another martial panoply featuring a drum, a canon, pole arms (with the central one again tipped with a “Liberty Cap”) and a shield with an American flag motif. Again the shield has 11-vertical stripes on the lower portion and 16-stars on the upper portion. Above the martial display is another floral splay. The curved blade is 29 ½” in length and 1 1/8” wide at the ricasso and the spine is a ¼” wide at that location as well. A single, wide fuller extends from the ricasso approximately 21 ½” towards the tip of the saber. The stirrup hilt and back strap are of iron, as they would be for any but the highest end English P-1796 officer’s saber. The hilt is 4 ½” long and the overall length of the saber is about 34 ½”. The rear of the guard is slotted for a saber knot and a pair of 15/16” long iron languets, the same width as the blade, extend form the front of the guard. The top of the guard extends 1 ½” above the blade and is tipped with a flat, round quillon. The wooden grip is grooved with an obvious palm-swell and covered in thin dark brown leather. Seven wraps of bronze or copper wire are present in the grooves. The wire has a wound center strand, flanked by two plain strands of wire, quite similar to the wire found on US Model 1833 Dragoon sabers. Interestingly the 1833 Dragoon was based upon the replacement for the Pattern 1796 saber, the Pattern 1821 saber. Other than the word “WARRENTED” no other identifying mark can be found on the saber other than a very tiny letter stamped on the spine, which may be a “C” or “G”. If it is a “G”, it may suggest Thomas Gill made the saber for the American market. The saber is in about FINE overall condition. The frosted etching on both sides of the blade is very clear and crisp and is about 90%+ present. The highly polished blade retains about 85%+ of its original bright polish as well. The etched panels show only some minor discoloration from freckled surface oxidation and some scattered flecks of discoloration. The last 8” of the blade, from the end of the fuller to the tip has been very lightly cleaned, and some minor surface scratches are visible in the polished steel. The blade is free of any significant dings or nicks, but a few tiny impact marks can be felt along the cutting edge if you carefully run your thumb along it. This is typical of any old sword that probably saw some light use, and then some additional action as a family heirloom "toy" reenacting the deeds of grandpa or great-grandpa. The iron stirrup hilt and back strap have an untouched mottled gray and brown patina with a mostly dark brown even coloration along the back strap, and some small areas of scattered minor surface oxidation scattered over the hilt. The leather wrap is original and is about 80%+ present, with largest single area of loss being at the obverse rear of the grip, where it has flaked away and another piece of leather has lifted and may flake off soon as well. The other areas of loss are some small wear spots on the reverse of the grip. The wire all appears to be original, and remains relatively tight and secure, with only some minor looseness noted at the obverse rear where the leather wrap has started to flake. The saber is accompanied by its original iron scabbard, and fits it perfectly. The scabbard retains both original iron suspension rings and is complete, including its throat. The scabbard was painted black a very long time ago, possibly during the period of use or immediately thereafter as a means of protecting a family heirloom. The scabbard was then decorated on the obverse with gold paint in a floral motif between the mounts. Only about 30%-40% of this paint remains, having worn off the scabbard from handling, storage and use over the years. The scabbard remains solid with the only condition issues worth noting being a tiny seam crack, about ½” long, 3 ¼” below the lower drag, and pair of deep dents between the mounts on the reverse. The upper dent is the deeper and larger of the two. A smaller, thumb-sized dent is also present on the obverse just below the upper mount. The scabbard matches the saber well and the old painted decorations really add to the overall eye appeal of the saber.

While it is impossible to know the exact date of manufacture and the exact period of use of this sword, it is almost certainly c1800 and most likely pre-War of 1812. The number of stars in the etched panels and the overall pattern are typical of earlier, rather than later Federal Era officer’s swords, which tend to be more heavily embellished. This sword, with its relatively short 29 ½” blade was almost certainly an infantry officer’s or artillery officer’s saber and the iron scabbard suggest use while mounted. This is a very attractive sword with a wonderful blade and lovely etching. It would be a wonderful addition to any collection of early American swords. This is a scarce pattern, and I have only seen a handful of these English P-1796 officer type swords etched with American martial motifs. It is a sword you will no doubt be very glad to add to your collection and to display on your wall. $1700.00

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U627. M1850 FOOT OFFICERS SWORD by P. (PHILLIP) H. TUSKA: This M1850 Foot Officer sword has in the past be misidentified as being a Tomes product, but has recently been id'ed as being retailed by P. (Phillip) H. Tuska. Tuska was a military outfitter in New York, NY and only in business 2-years, 1861-1863, making this a true Civil War sword. All his swords have identical features to include a black leather grip with triple-wire; “T” marked blade; a large eagle with a turned down beak and upwarded turned wings; and US vertical to the blade. The scabbard leather body is similar to that made by Ames and Roby. The hilt on this sword is tight with 100% original leather and wire. The white leather washer keeps the 31 inch blade tight. The blade retains light original frosting and is deeply etched.  The scabbard fits tight with all original mounts and screws and is solid, but has some minor leather lose and crazing. $1150.00

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U636.   SAUERBIER M1850 FOOT OFFICERS SWORD:  This M1850 Foot Officers sword is a product of Sauerbier from New Jersey and though it is unmarked, it has the distinct features associated with Sauerbier: the screw attaching the guard to the pommel cap; the unstopped fuller;  and the pommel cap nut.  The guard is the design with the small US in the center and it is tight with no movement. The pommel cap has additional chase-work; the leather grip has a little wear, but 100% triple-strand wire. The leather blade washer holds the blade tight. Also, it is frosty with outstanding etching to include Lady Justice holding a scale above her head and a large US on one side and military motif to with cross cannons, which could indicate the sword was for an artillery officer. The scabbard has the throat and drag unique to Sauerbier, is dent free, and a nice gray-brown patina. $1900.00

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U643.  M1840 ENLISTED CAVALRY SABER MODEL 1840, TYPE 2 – HORSTMANN, EMERSON & SILVER : This Model 1840 enlisted saber is a unique piece not only because it is a Civil War period saber, but is a great example of the cooperation between sword makers and retailers at that time. Emerson & Silver, located in Trenton New Jersey, was a major producer of edge weapons, and Horstmann, located in Philadelphia, was a major retailer of military supplier during the Civil War. On the blade is the Keystone symbol associated with Emerson & Silver, which identifies the maker, and the Horstmann retailer mark. The scabbard throat piece has 1 screw on the riverside side, making this a Type-2 version. The hilt is plain in design with 100% original leather and wire, and the blade is un-etched. The scabbard is dent free, but shows wear on the drag, and has a deep rich brown patina. This is a great example a Horstmann Type-2 Enlisted saber with a blade by Emerson & Silver. $1700.00

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U647. PRESENTATION SWORD BELONGING TO LIEUTENANT  COL. JAMES C. RICE;  GETTYSBURG,  LITTLE ROUND TOP: The existence of this sword and the fact it survived the war was just discovered. It is a Horstmann M1850 Staff & Field, Heavily Curved Blade with a Silver-Foiled Scabbard. The hilt is the standard designed with shark-skin grip and triple wire with a standard etched blade marked Horstmann on both sides, and a good amount of original frosting. The Silver-Foiled Scabbard has rarely been seen and is more properly referred to as “close plating.” John Thillmann writes about this style Horstmann sword and scabbard in his book on Civil War Army Swords; pages 328-329. The scabbard body is original to the sword, fits like a glove and shows evidence of being carried. It has uncommon fancy brass mounts which retain original screws. In fact, you can see plating worn-off in areas exposing the underlying steel. This is especially noticeable between the top two mounts where the carrying officer would hold the scabbard. As of result, the engraved presentation, which is on the back side of the scabbard, is worn down and not noticeable at first, which account for its unknown existence for so long.  On close examination the presentation reads:

Lieut. Col. Rice, Forty-fourth Regiment N. Y. S. V. Presented by his Albany Friends.'

Most of the presentation swords during the early years of the Civil War were not fancy as those seen in later years. Often they were standard sword with maybe a fancier scabbard, and the presentation engraved on or between the mounts.

Rice was born in Worthington, Mass., Dec. 27, 1829. He attended school, but was mainly self-educated until he entered Yale, where he graduated in 1854. He engaged in teaching for a while at Natchez, Miss., became literary editor of a newspaper, and then commenced the study of law. A year later he removed to New York City, where he was admitted to the bar in 1856 and began to practice. When the Civil War began, Rice enlisted as a private on 28 May 1861 in the 39th New York Infantry Regiment quickly, was chosen adjutant and becoming a Captain of Company B and fought at the First Battle of Bull Run. Rice was mustered out of the 39th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment on 12 Sep 1861. The next day Rice became lieutenant colonel of the newly formed 44th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment (also known as People's Ellsworth Regiment).

Shortly afterward he became colonel of the regiment; he led it in the Peninsula Campaign at Yorktown, Hanover Court House, Gaines' Mill, and Malvern Hill. At the Second Battle of Bull Run (Manassas), Colonel Rice took command of the 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, V Corps when its commander, Daniel Butterfield took command of the consolidated 1st and 2nd Brigades and other ranking officers were wounded on the second day of battle. Rice returned to command of the 44th New York and led it at the battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville.

At the Battle of Gettysburg, Rice and his regiment were sent to the defense of Little Round Top. During the fighting, brigade commander Colonel Strong Vincent was mortally wounded and Rice once again assumed command of the 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, V Corps and led it for the remainder of the battle. He performed distinguished service at Gettysburg while commanding a brigade during the second day's fight, by holding the extreme left of the line against repeated attacks and defending Round Top from a flank movement. For this he received a Brigadier-General's commission in the volunteer army Aug. 17, 1863.

In March, 1864 General Rice was in command ofthe 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, V Corps which he led in the advance on Mine Run and in the operations in the Wilderness, and was mortally wounded at Laurel Hill, VA. As he lay dying he muttered the words "turn me over that I may die with my face to the enemy." He died on the Spotsylvania battlefield on May 10, 1864. He was buried at Albany Rural Cemetery, Menands, New York.

On receiving his appointment in the 44th  New York, Lieut. Col. Rice was the recipient of a beautiful sword, belt, &c., from the ladies and gentlemen of Albany. The following account of the presentation is taken from the Albany Evening Journal of October 19th, 1861:

A large company of ladies and gentlemen met at the house of A. McClure last evening, on the occasion of the presentation of sword, &c., to Lieut. Col. Rice, of the Ellsworth regiment. Among those present were Gov. Morgan, Hon. Erastus Corning, John G. Saxe, Esq., and other distinguished citizens. The Presentation Address was made by Mrs. William Barnes, who spoke with great feeling and in a vein of patriotic fervor, which stirred the hearts of all who listened. It will be long before the recipient will forget her eloquent words and impressive counsels. Lieut. Col. Rice responded in an address marked at once by earnestness and scholarly finish. He pledged those present that the sword, of which he was the recipient, should return to its scabbard, when the war was ended, untarnished; and that no friend should have cause to blush over his record. He was deeply affected, and spoke with the pathos of earnest feeling.

"The sword is beautifully finished, and bears the following inscription: 'Lieut. Col. Rice, Forty-fourth Regiment N. Y. S. V. Presented by his Albany Friends.'

The wear on the sword and scabbard indicates it was carried by RIce, and most likely saw service in the early battles of the Civil War to possibly include Gettysburg.

Silver plated scabbard are difficult to photograph, so I apologies for the quality of the photos. The sword looks better when held in your hands.

Included with this sword is a binder completed of all military records for Rice, and a CD Disk of the history of the 44th New York Regiment. This is a momentous find and extremely important historic artifact related to the American Civil War and the Battle of Gettysburg.$28,000.00 SALE PRICE $12,000.00

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U649. SAUERBIER PLAIN HILT TYPE-1 OFFICERS CAVALRY SABER: This unmarked saber has a plain Type-1 hilt with the turn-downed pommel cap unique to Sauerbier. There were two sizes for the guard, and this one is the slightly smaller example. The grip is 100% original shark-skin with a single twisted brass wire. The original blade washer is present and the 34 1/2 inch M1860 style blade is bright with much original frosting mixed with some dark spots here and there (no pitting), and detailed etching to include a raised wing eagle and large U.S. The scabbard is a matching Type-1 style with wide plain brass mounts having only a single scribed line at the border. All mounts retain the original screws and have a pleasing patina. This is a great example of a Sauerbier Plain Hilt Type-1 Officers Cavalry Saber.$2500.00  

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U650. SAUERBIER PLAIN HILT TYPE-1 OFFICERS CAVALRY SABER: This unmarked saber has a plain Type-1 hilt with the turn-downed pommel cap unique to Sauerbier. There were two sizes for the guard, and this one is the slightly smaller example. The grip is 100% original black leather with a single twisted brass wire. The original blade washer is present, and the 35 inch M1860 style blade is bright with traces of original frosting and a few minor nicks. The scabbard has a bright steel body with heavy ornate brass mounts. All mounts retain the original screws and have a pleasing patina. This is a great example of a Sauerbier Plain Hilt Type-1 Officers Cavalry Saber.$2550.00  

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U651. AMES M1860 NAVAL CUTLASS & SCABBARD: This is an Ames M1860 Naval Cutlass complete with the original scabbard. The hilt is tight with 100% original leather and no wire, which is common. Its rack number is 12M 655. The blade is Ames marked and dates 1862, but no inspection mark making this most likely a state or Army purchased cutlass. The leather blade washer is original, and there is some minor surfacepitting. The scabbard is original and complete including the tip and all rivets. It has a few soft spots, but no breaks, and has taken on a brown patina to the leather. It is not often that you find a cutlass complete with the scabbard. $1400.00

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U652. M1850 STAFF & FIELD SWORD, HORSTMANN: This M1850 Staff & Field sword was retailed by Horstmann.  It is in great condition with 95% original gold wash on the brass, a frosty blade, and a dent free scabbard. The slight wear on the sword indicates it was carried, but not abused and well maintained. Truly, a great looking sword! $2800.00

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U653. EMERSON & SILVER – SILVER HILT OFFICERS SWORD:  This sword, though not maker marked, is a product of Emerson & Silver of New Jersey. It is a Silver-Hilt foot or Staff Officers sword. The front of the guard is shaped like a foot officer’s sword, but has the US on both sides making it a Staff & Field version.  The hilt it tight with a great German silver grip with all original wire. The blade has very light etching, which is another common characteristic of Emerson & Silver, and has the white buff leather blade washer. What really makes this sword unique is the scabbard.  It is leather covered steel, which was something new at the time of the Civil War. Most of the time, the leather is damaged and partially or completely gone. This one is complete with all original mounts and screws and great chase work on the front. $2500.00

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U673. GETTYSBURG - ROBY PRESENTATION M1850STAFF & FIELD SWORD, CHAPLAIN 111TH NEW YORK INFANTRY: This sword came out of a long-time collection of New York State identified swords, and a search of records at the National Archives, as well as all Civil War data base files, reveal only one Field & Staff Officers associated with this name.

John Nelson Brown

 Chaplain 111th New York Volunteer Infantry

The presentation reads:

Presented to

Lieut J. N. Brown

by H. S. Brown

He is the only Staff & Field officer (Chaplain) associated with this name for all New York regiments, as well as all other State troops fighting for the Union. Chaplain Brown was mustered in August 1862 and was with the regiment when it surrendered at Harper’s Ferry in September 1862. He was present for the Battle of Gettysburg, and is documented as being on the front line preaching to the soldiers, and giving comfort to the injured and dying during the battle. He would be present during the Battle of the Wilderness and Spotsylvania, as well as Cold Harbor and the Siege of Petersburg.

This style sword was authorized for carry by all S & F officers regardless of rank, and since Chaplain's did hold dual rank in the Civil War and were assigned to a Staff & Field position, the sword is appropriate for him as a Lieutenant and Chaplain. The identity of the presenter H. S. Brown is currently unknown, but most likely is a relative.

The sword is made by Roby, Chelmsford Massachusetts. The hilt is tight and retains good traces of original gold wash, and has 100% original shark-skin grip and triple strand wire. The blade is bright and frosty with outstanding etching. The scabbard is dent free, retains all original mounts, and the presentation on the top Roby marking are east to read. Included with the sword is a binder containing historical information, and Browns’ military and pension file.  This sword has been hidden away for many years in a private collection and only recently surfaced for sale.  Here is an opportunity to not only own a piece of Civil War history, but a sword carried by a Chaplain during the pivotal battle of Gettysburg. $6700.00

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U679. AMES TYPE-2 M1850 STAFF & FIELD SWORD: This is an earlier version of the Ames M1850 Type-2 Staff & Field sword as is evident by the block etched US on the blade. The hilt is tight with no movement, and retains original gold on the basket, but not the pommel cap or scabbard mounts. The remaining bass has a mixed reddish-brown patina. The shark-skin grip and double strand wire is 100% original. The blade washer holds the blade is tight.  Blade length is 32 inches and retains much original frosting with the standard eagle; block etched US and Ames marking. The type-2 scabbard is complete with all brass fittings and original screws. It is dent free and the brass mounts have the same matching patina as the hilt.  The blue scabbard has taken on a nice rich brown patina. This sword shows evidence of being carried, but was well maintained. $2200.00

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U687. NON-REGULATION FOOT OFFICERS SWORD: This is a Non-Regulation Foot Officers sword. The patina is an even deep dark brown on the steel hilt and the scabbard. The blade shows some wear, but retains much original frosting. The guard and grip is tight, and retains 98% original shark-skin. The blade is maker marked W. Walscheid Solingen with the brass prove mark. The scabbard has two small door ding. $950.00

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U693.   SAUERBIER M1850 FOOT OFFICERS SWORD: This M1850 Foot Officers sword is a product of Sauerbier from New Jersey and is marked as such, and has the distinct features associated with Sauerbier: the screw attaching the guard to the pommel cap and the unstopped fuller.  The guard is the standard design and it is tight with no movement. The pommel cap has additional chase-work; the leather grip is 100% complete with triple strand wire. The nicely etched blade is held tight with the original blade washer.  The scabbard has the flame-throat, simple mounts and a drag unique to Sauerbier. It is dent free with nice patina. $1900.00

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U692. ROBY M1850 STAFF & FIELD SWORD: This is a Roby Model 1850 Staff & Field sword with its original brown metal scabbard. This sword shows evidence of being carried, but not abused. The hilt has a little movement, has traces of original gold wash, and has 100% original sharkskin grip and triple-strand wire. The Roby marked blade has a gray patina with original frosting, nice etching with evidence of period sharpening. The scabbard is bent and rust free, is Roby marked, and retains all original mounts and screws.  $1900.00

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U695. BOSTON M1850 FOOT OFFICER SWORD - HAMILTON RUDDICK, BOSTON: This sword was inspected by a well-respected sword-smith who identified the sword has being made by Hamilton Ruddick, Boston.  This is only the second known M1850 Foot Officer Sword made by this maker and very rare. The guard retains 50% plus original gold wash and it tight. The grip looks to be shark-skin, but is in fact a thin metal foil (German silver or pewter) and is also rare to see. The blade is bright with deep etching and no rust, pitting or nicks. The scabbard is very solid with all original mounts and screws with surface crazing on the bottom portion. Overall, this is a nice example of a Civil War Foot Officers sword from a seldom seen maker. $1700.00

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U699. M1850 STAFF & FIELD SWORD - EMERSON & SILVER: This M1850 Staff & Field sword was made by Emerson & Silver, Trenton N.J., and is in great condition. If you have been looking for a sword from the Civil War years, this fits the bill because they only were in operation between the years 1860-1865. The sword has a tight hilt with original shark-skin grip and triple wire. The blade is tight with original light etching and much frosting. Emerson & Silver blades are known for light etching and when you find one this nice, it is exciting. The scabbard is German silver with original mounts. All the brass has a pleasing patina. These are much rarer the Ames and Horstmann swords and hard to find. $2600.00  

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U700. TOMES, SON & MELVAIN CAVALRY OFFICER SABER: This is an import Cavalry Officer Saber retailed by Tomes, Son & Melvain, New York; 1859-1864. It is a typical import saber, but with exceptional etching. The faint Tomes, Son & Melvain retailer mark is pen-etched in the ricasso area. Continue up the blade to find a knight in armor, an eagle holds an E. Pluribus Unum banner, cross musket, a sword, and the head of an Alligator. The Alligator head is very unusual and makes this a possible pre-war purchased by a Southern officer. On the opposite side of the blade is an unfurled flags, U. S., a rider less horse, a crossed sword and bugle, and the head of an eagle with a large beak.  All this etching is visible to the eye, but faint. The blade is free of rust or pitting, has a few very small dings, and appears to have been clean in its past. The two original blade washers blade prevent movement. The grip retains 100% original sharkskin and wire; center dragoon strand with two flanking stands. The scabbard body is dent and rust free with all original brass mounts. The screws for the throat piece and the drag might not be original, and the drag has a door dent. A Tomes, Son & Melvain saber is a rare find. $2600.00

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U701.   SAUERBIER M1850 FOOT OFFICERS SWORD This M1850 Foot Officers sword is a product of Sauerbier from New Jersey and though it is unmarked, it has the distinct features associated with Sauerbier: the screw attaching the guard to the pommel cap; the unique pommel cap shape; the pommel cap nut; the leather grip instead of the normal shark skin, and the unstopped fuller design associated with Sauerbier.  

The guard design is the standard M1850 version with a pommel cap that has additional chase-work. The hilt is tight with no movement, and has an even brown patina. The leather blade washer holds the blade tight. The blade has strong Sauerbier features and is bright with no nick. The scabbard retains all original mounts and screws, which has a pleasing patina, and the leather is strong. $1600.00

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U702. M1850 FOOT OFFICERS SWORD This is a great example of a M1850 Foot Officers sword. It has no foreign characteristics from Solingen, England or France, and all indications of being American made, but it unmarked. The hilt is tight with traced of gold wash and great reddish-brown patina, which is matching on the scabbard mounts. The black leather grip is 100% original with double-strand wire. The red felt blade washer is original and holds the blade tight. The blade, which more curved than normal, is bright, nick free, and has light original frosting. The scabbard leather is reverse stitch, strong with no breaks, but with normal crazing and some loss of leather from normal wear. $1300.00

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U704. M1850 FOOT OFFICERS SWORD – COLLINS & Co. MADE - RETAILED BY FELLOW & Co.: This is a high quality M1850 Foot Officers sword produced by Collins & Co. Hartford Conn, and retailed by  Fellows & Co. New York. I believe most collectors are familiar with Collins & Co. The hilt is tight with 100% original shark-skin grip with Dragoon wire and two single wires. The bright frosty blade is held tight with the original red felt blade washer. The blade is Collins maker marked; dated 1862, retailer marked Fellows & Co. New York, and has great etching to include “U S” - “Liberty or Death” – “Union there is Strength” and a perched eagles. The scabbard is steel with all original fancy brass mount, and has great patina. Fellows & Co. was in business in Tory, NY north of Albany and this not a listed supplier of military good, appears to have ventured into that business during the Civil War. $2500.00

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U706. NON-REGULATION FOOT OFFICERS SWORD: This is a Non-Regulation Foot Officers sword. The patina is an even deep gray on the steel hilt and the deep brown on the scabbard. The blade shows some wear, but still bright with much original frosting. The guard and grip is tight, the wire is original twisted steel with two side wires, and the original shark-skin grip is complete with a few wear spots. The blade is maker marked W. Walscheid Solingen with the brass prove mark. $850.00

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U707. AMES M1850 STAFF & FIELD SWORD: This known as a Type-2 Ames M1850 Staff & Field sword. This hilt is tight with traces of gold wash, and a tight grip with 100% original shark-skin and wire. The original blade washer holds the blade tight, and the etching is strong with much original frosting, but some areas of surface peppers spotting. It has never been sharpened and has a sharp point. The scabbard still has the original bluing with no dents or dings, and retains all original mounts with some original gold wash.  $2200.00

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U708. CLAUBERG – M1850 STAFF & FIELD SWORD: This is a Clauberg M1850 Staff & Field sword. The hilt has a little wiggle as a result of the blade washer being gone; however, it is in great shape with a good amount of original gold wash. The grip is 70% original shark skin with only one strand of original wire. The blade is over-bright with a dark area near the hilt a spot above the US and Eagle. The etching is strong with original frosting. It never was sharpened and has a sharp point. The scabbard has all original brown finish, except above the top mount, most likely due to being held there by an officer. The mounts have nice chase work and lots of gold wash. The drag is dented on the back side, but has a nice eagle design. $1750.00

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U710. M1840 MUSICIAN SWORD – EMERSON & SILVER: This is an Emerson & Silver Musician sword complete with the original metal scabbard. The hilt is tight with a nice even patina. The blade is bright under a light gray patina is shows better than in the photos. It had never been sharpened. It is Emerson & Silver maker marked, and inspection marked US/DFM/1863, DFM is also marked on the guard. The scabbard is complete with all mounts and screws, and is undented on its body, but the drag show plenty of wear dings. You will often see the selling in the $500-$750 range, but I do not believe they command that high of a price even if mint. This might not be mint, but it is a lot of sword at this price. Shipping is included. $380.00

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U711. AMES SHORT ARTILLERY SWORD, DATES 1842: This is an Ames Short Artillery sword dated 1842. It was recently discovered in great untouched attic condition and fresh to the collector market. The hilt has a deep dark brown patina and looks amazing. The cross guard has the inspection initials W.A.T. The blade is tight, never sharpened, has the Eagle, N. P. Ames, Springfield maker marks, and inspection mark United States/1842/JCB. Often you fine these blades buffed-out to be bright; this one is bright with great age blemished and never cleaned. The scabbard did its job of protecting the blade. The scabbard is very solid with light crazing with no breaks or weak spots. Both mounts are original and only the two front rivets on the top throat piece are missing. $1350.00

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U715. HORSTMANN MOUNTED INFANTRY M1850 OFFICER SWORD: It is rare to find an example of a Horstmann Mounted Infantry Officer sword! This sword shows use, but not abuse. It has a little wear on the top of the grip, retains 100% original double-strand wire, and is tight. There are traces of gold wash on the guard with very nice copper-brown patina on the expose brass. The blade has strong etching with some areas with dark spotting and a strong tip, and is Horstmann marked. The metal scabbard has a deep brown patina, retains all mounts with screws and wear on the drag.  Overall, this is a rare and hard to find sword. $1950.00  

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U716. AMES M1850 FOOT OFFICERS SWORD: This is an early example of an Ames M1850 Foot Officers sword. You can identify the early swords by the maker mark and the size of the block US etching. This sword has the circle Ames needle point maker mark and the Ames scroll mark, as well as the smaller block US. This sword has seen use, but is still in great condition. The hilt is tight with 100% original shark-skin grip and double strand wire. There is still a good amount of gold was with a pleasing copper-brown patina. The etching is strong and still has some spots of frosting. The scabbard is solid with crazing and some leather loss, but is complete. The top mount of the scabbard is Ames marked and the drag has the officers name “Hertfelder.” The name is not enough to make a positive identification. Here is an early example of a key sword from the Civil War.  $1300.00

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U718. AMES M1833 SHORT ARTILLERY SWORD & WHITE BUFF LEATHER RIG: This is an Ames M1833 Short Artillery sword complete with its original white buff leather rig. The sword blade is near-mint, never sharpened, Ames marked and dated 1838. The cross guard and the tip of the drag are stamped MS for Massachusetts. The scabbard is solid with crazing, and a period repair. The white buff leather rig is complete with the US buckle and in outstanding condition. It is for sale below market value. $2250.00

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MASSACHUSETTS – PRESENTATION SWORD:

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