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Enfields-Revolvers-Muskets

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F117.   CONFEDERATE - CONVERSION MUSKETThis is an outstanding example of a Confederate converted musket. The lock, bolster are very unique and not of a Northern design. In fact, when you remove the barrel and the lock you will find the Confederate arsenal assembly marks on several parts on the wood under the lock; on the underside of the barrel; and on three of the internal lock parts.  This was a common practice associated with many Confederate repaired and altered musket.  The ram-rod has a cork screw twist that is often seen in other Confederate muskets.$2300.00

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F120.  PLYMOUTH RIFLE: This is a Plymouth Rifle produced by Whitney and dated 1864. The rifle is complete with its original rear site, ram-rod, and all factory parts. The metal has an even brown patina and has never been cleaned, and the stock has no issues.  The sling swivels are both present, but the front one is frozen. The lock works in both half & full cock, and the plate is dated 1864, and the US and Whitneyville marks are faint; however, I do not see an eagle stamp and am not sure if one was ever there. The tang on the barrel has the serial number 9989, and there is still good rifling in the bore. This rifle was designed with a rifle lug for either a saber bayonet made by Collins or the Dahlgren Bowie bayonet knife. $1600.00

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F152.  CONFEDERATE SINCLAIR, HAMILTON & COMPANY: During the Civil War, a large number of 1853 Enfield Rifles was supplied to the Confederacy by the Sinclair, Hamilton & Company. This is an untouched, out of the attic example of one of those rifles. The lock is marked with a Crown to the rear, and 1862 Tower forward of the hammer. The Sinclair, Hamilton & Company mark on this gun is a Crown over S H / G 3. Additionally, and thought faint, you can see the outline of the I.C. oval cartouche on the stock flat opposite the lock. This mark is usually found on Sinclair, Hamilton & Company marked guns as an inspector mark. After years of research and comparison to other know Confederate Enfield rifles, the Crown over S H / G # is now considered 1 of 4 known marks use by Sinclair, Hamilton & Company. The numbers 1-5 are believed to be associated with the different supplier.  The lock is maker marked S&W and the stock is marked H&E. The wood has never been sanded and has a nice light color with great original patina, and all the metal parts have the same even plum-brown patina. The lock functions properly, the nipple is original, and the rifle bore has strong rifling. The bayonet, which is an arsenal altered union bayonet, fits tight and is period original to the gun. This is common to many Confederate guns. $2300.00

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F171. "G"- MARKED 1854 LORENZ RIFLE - IDENTIFIED TO A TEXAS SOLDIER: This is a "G" Marked Lorenz Rifle, which came out of Texas and is identified to a soldier from the Texas 11th Infantry through family history. The gun was imported into the Confederacy by the state of Georgia as is evident by the "G" stamp on the side of the musket. It turns out that many of these "G" marked Lorenz rifle came through the blockade via Texas, and may explain how it ended up being issued to a Texas soldier.

The rifle is in outstanding condition. The stock is in great condition and never sanded. On the right side of the stock is the "G" mark, and a three half-cycle design to which its meaning is unknown. On the left side of the stock are the initials J. S. (most likely is the initials of the first soldier who carried the gun, and a six point star. All metal parts are original and have matching patina; the rear-site is complete and works; all sling swivels are present; and the ramrod is original. Finally, the action is tight and holds in both half and full cock, and the rifling is sharp and strong. Included is the original bayonet and its scabbard, both are in amazing condition and fits like a glove. With the gun is a letter from the descendant of Private Phillip K. Koonce, 11th Texas Infantry. It documents how the rifle was passed down from generation to generation, and that Phillip K. Koonce owned it as his last known rifle.  Records indicate the existence of a Confederate Pension and that he was buried in Shelby County Texas, White Rock Cemetery. Research is complete and I obtained the Pension File for Private Phillip K.Koonce, which will be included.

Koonce initially started in a Home Guard unit then joined the 11th Texas Infantry (Roberts Regulars) around December 1863, and remained with the 11th up to its surrender and disbandment in May 1865. He was with the unit for the Red River campaign, and engagements including Wilson's Farm, Carroll's Mill, Mansfield, and Pleasant Hill in Louisiana. Here is an outstand “G” marked Lorenz rifle identified to a Texas soldier. $4500.00

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F216.  MODEL1817 COMMON RIFLE, PERCUSSION CONVERSION: The M1817 common rifle (also known as Deringer M1817 rifle) was a flintlock muzzle-loaded weapon issued due to the Dept. of Ordnance's order of 1814, produced by Henry Deringer and used from the 1820s to 1840s at the American frontier. Unlike the half-octagon barreled Model 1814 common rifle that preceded it, it had a barrel that was round for most of its length. The 36-inch barrel was rifled for .54 caliber bullets. For rifling it had seven grooves. Like the Model 1814, it had a large oval patch-box in the buttstock; however the buttstock dropped steeper than on the Model 1814. After producing the Model 1814 common rifle through contractors, the military decided to do the same with the Model 1817. The Harper's Ferry Arsenal produced a pattern weapon, which was then taken to gunsmiths to be copied. The rifle was built by Henry Deringer of Philadelphia (13,000 made), Nathan Starr & Co. of Middleton, Conn. (10,200 made), Simeon North of Middleton, Conn. (7,200 made), R. Johnson of Middleton, Conn. (5,000 made), R. & J. D. Johnson of Middleton, Conn. (3,000 made). Over time, the rifles became obsolete, but they still saw service during the Civil War; originally flintlocks, most were converted to percussion cap for their firing mechanism. They saw service in the west, as far as California, where there were still Model 1817s in the Bencia, California arsenal in the 1860s.

This rifle is an example of the percussion conversion with a seven grooved barrel, and the rifling is very strong. The stock is in great condition showing normal dings and wear. The original lock plate is marked US DERINGER PHILADA, has the percussion conversion, and is functional in full cock. The patch-box opens and closes with ease, and both swing swivels are present.  These are getting harder to find in such nice condition. $1300.00

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F217.  M1817 COMMON RIFLE, PERCUSSION CONVERSIONThe M1817 common rifle (also known as Deringer M1817 rifle) was a flintlock muzzle-loaded weapon issued due to the Dept. of Ordnance's order of 1814, produced by Henry Deringer and used from the 1820s to 1840s at the American frontier. Unlike the half-octagon barreled Model 1814 common rifle that preceded it, it had a barrel that was round for most of its length. The 36-inch barrel was rifled for .54 caliber bullets. For rifling it had seven grooves. Like the Model 1814, it had a large oval patch-box in the buttstock; however the buttstock dropped steeper than on the Model 1814. After producing the Model 1814 common rifle through contractors, the military decided to do the same with the Model 1817. The Harper's Ferry Arsenal produced a pattern weapon, which was then taken to gunsmiths to be copied. The rifle was built by Henry Deringer of Philadelphia (13,000 made), Nathan Starr & Co. of Middleton, Conn. (10,200 made), Simeon North of Middleton, Conn. (7,200 made), R. Johnson of Middleton, Conn. (5,000 made), R. & J. D. Johnson of Middleton, Conn. (3,000 made). Over time, the rifles became obsolete, but they still saw service during the Civil War; originally flintlocks, most were converted to percussion cap for their firing mechanism. They saw service in the west, as far as California, where there were still Model 1817s in the Bencia, California arsenal in the 1860s.

This M1817 Common Rifle is unique. First, the bore was rifle with eight straight groves with no twist. This was done to improve accuracy with Buck & Ball ammunition, not a standard bullet. When I opened the patch-box cover, I saw four hash marks ////, and I found those same marks on the barrels retention screw.  The stock is in average condition showing hard use with normal dings and expected wear for a gun used in combat. The original lock plate is marked US  R JOHNSON MIDDLETON, has the percussion conversion, and is functional in both full & haft cock. The patch-box opens and closes with ease, but the rear sling swivels is missing.  The straight rifling is worn from heavy use, but can been seen with a good bore light. $1300.00

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F220. CONFEDERATE P-1851 MINIÉ RIFLE - VERY SCARCE:  The Pattern 1851 Minié Rifle is on

F222. CONFEDERATE 1853 ENFIELD RIFLE - SINCLAIR, HAMILTON & COMPANY MARKED:  During the Civil War, a large proportionate of 1853 Enfield Rifle Muskets were supplied by the Sinclair, Hamilton & Company and are found with the following marks:

This Confederate 1853 3-band Enfield is in fine to near-mint condition with the Oval SCH mark.  This gun was discovered in Virginia and most likely was carried by a soldier from that state. This rifle has amazing original bluing on the barrel and mounts, and a wood has pleasing eye appeal. There is even a screw in the wood behind the nipple which appears to be orignal to the gun because it has period bluing with a little wear. The stock is maker marked WILLIAMSON BROTHERS, and the middle barrel band and lock are marks T. & W. W. Also, the inside stock near the barrel screw; the barrel and the lock are all marked H.C.

The Oval SHC mark is by the butt plate tang, and on the flat area opposite the lock, and between the top barrel band and the brass nose cap there is the silhouette of a large oval, but the SHC is worn and difficult to see.  This third mark is extremely rare! The rifle still retains the original rear sight, which still works, and there remains good rifling in the bore. It is extremly rare to find a Confederate Enfield with nearly 100% original bluing.  $3800.00

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