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F206. CONFEDERATE 1853 ENFIELD RIFLE - SINCLAIR, HAMILTON & COMPANY MARKED:  During the Civil War, a large number of 1853 Enfield Rifle Muskets were supplied by the Sinclair, Hamilton & Company and are found with the following marks:

This Confederate 1853 3-band Enfield is in near-mint condition with the Oval SCH mark.  This gun was discovered in Mississippi and most likely was carried by a soldier from that state. The rifle is all original with great un-touched brown patina on all steel parts; a dark brown stock; and matching assembly numbers. There is a wood knot in the stock, which appears on both sides of the barrel. This show that quality control was not and issue. Also, the photo lighting make it look lighter then it is and the photos of the markings is correct. The stock is maker marked JOHN  MARSON and XX III (23) in the ram-rob channel. The barrel is maker marked SMITH and the number 23 twice. The lock is maker marked SMITH and the number 23, and both lock retention screws are marked XX III (23). Also, all three barrel bands are numbered 23, and the only part with a different number is the barrel retention screw with the mark X\ //. The front site is worn down.  

The Oval SHC mark is by the butt plate tang, on the flat area opposite the lock, and between the top barrel band and brass nose cap there is the silhouette of a large oval with the SHC worn and difficult to see.  This third mark is extremely rare! The rifle still retains the original rear sight, and there remains good rifling in the bore. $2900.00

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F226.  METROPOLITAN ARMS NAVAL REVOLVER: This Metropolitan Ames Naval Revolver was discovered in a Little Rock Arkansas home along with a Confederate Arkansas Toothpick D-Guard Bowie knife. The revolver is covered in 150 years a grease and has a dark brown/black patina. It has not been cleaned. The gun is in outstanding condition and is fully operational. The action is tight and the cylinder cycles with no problem; has all original nipples and a strong cylinder scene of the Battle of New Orleans. The gun is all original with matching serial number 3359 on all parts except the cylinder, which is 3209, but from looking at the patina it is obvious it is factory original to the gun. How this Union late war gun ended up in Little Rock Arkansas is unknown, but it looks great and fits both a Union and Confederate holster. $1900.00

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F228.  CONFEDERATE 1853 3-BAND ENFIELD RIFLE – SCRIPT JS WITHIN A CIRCLEThis is a Confederate 1853 3-band Enfield Rifle. The recently published book “The English Connection” outline the different viewer marks on Confederate Enfield rifles, and the script JS within a circle is one of those marks, which is located by the butt-plate tang. Though a little faint, this mark is visible in this gun. Those guns with any Circle mark are normally are early to the war, and it with a Tower lock the date should be 1861. This gun is dated 1861, has the script JS Circle mark, and is in great attic condition. The stock is solid with expect dings; the lock function in both half and full cock; the nipple and ram-rod are original; the barrel is properly marked; and all parts have matching assemble marks////, and the patina on all the metal is a deep brown, but no rear site. The bore is dark, butthe rifling is strong. Also, another Confederate feature is the sling swivel have been removed. Since slings were in short supply, the swivels served no purpose and only annoyed the solder. How often do you see a true Confederate 1853 3-band Enfield below two thousand?  $1800.00

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F229. MANHATTAN NAVY SERIES REVOLVER: Manhattan Fire Arms Co. was founded in 1856 specifically to capitalize on the soon to be expired Colt patents in 1857. This strategy worked very well for the company and they began by making high quality copies of both Colts and other popular pistols with expired patents. In fact, Manhattan’s copies of Colts were so close that Colt tried to kill their production with a lawsuit, even though their patent had expired. Quite obviously, this pistol is a direct and quality copy of the Colt 1851 Navy. Manhattan revolvers were very well received by the public. The company never received U.S. military contract, except for a small delivery, most likely on the regimental level. Nevertheless, many Manhattan revolvers found themselves on Civil War battlefields, purchased privately by officers and soldiers.This gun shows wear and the five distinct cylinder scenes are faint. The action is tight; both half and full cock works; the cylinder indexes properly; the trigger is crisp, the bore's lands & groves are sharp; it has a 6 1/2 inch barrel; and serial number 4900. I have been told the gun has a value of $1600.00, but it is priced at a discount. $1300.00

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CONFEDERATE - VIRGINIA – SHOTGUN, FEATURED ON PAGE 94-95 CONFEDERATE SHOTGUNS

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F232. CONFEDERATE CAPTURED & ARSENAL REPAIRED AND REISSUED CONTRACT M1860 RIFLE: During the Civil War, the Confederates would salvage supplies off the battlefield and send weapons to their arsenals to be refurbished and reissued to Southern troops. This is one such Model 1860 contract rifle to which this was done. It is an 1862 dated Bridgesburg rifle. The Confederate Arsenal work includes an Austrian Lorenz hammer, a common blade rear site, different barrel bands held in place by screws, and a Confederate fabricated ram-rod.  On the butt of the stock are inlays, to which the meanings are unknow; they could be either Union or Confederate. The nipple has been replaced. The rifling is faint and all but shot smooth, which is another indication this was a Confederate carried rifle.  What I like about this rifle is that it is a Confederate captured, refurbished and reissued gun, but it is more affordable then a Confederate Enfield or Southern made rifle. $1400.00

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F233. CONFEDERATE 1853 3-BAND ENFIELD RIFLE – SL WITHIN A CIRCLE: This is a Confederate 1853 3-band Enfield Rifle. The recently published book “The English Connection” outline the different viewer marks on Confederate Enfield rifles, and the block SL within a circle is one of those marks, which is located by the butt-plate tang. At the time of publication, only two examples of the block SL within a circle were known. This rifle is in amazing condition: it retains the original finish on the stock; The barrel and barrel-bands have a deep patina, the ramrod is original, the Circle SL mark is strong; both sling swivels are complete, and the lock is dated 1861. The bore is shot smooth indicating heavy use by the Confederate soldier, but the gun was well maintained. These early war Enfield dated 1861 with a Confederate Circle SL viewer mark are extremely rare to find, especially in this condition. $3500.00

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F234. CONFEDERATE HOLSTER with a COLT 4 1/2-INCH POLICE REVOLVER: This is a Confederate carried Colt Police 4 1/2-inch barrel revolver with its Confederate holster. You can see the holster is original to the gun because of the bend in the leather at the toe where the shorter barrel ends leaving 1-inch of room. The holster shows wear, but is complete with the back strap and the front retention strap, and wear near the trigger guard and hammer areas of the holster.  The revolver fits tight in it. The revolver is 100% complete with matching number 26500 (1864) including the wedge, all original screws and grips. The gun most likely was captured and put into Confederate service. $1800.00

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F235. CONFEDERATE HOLSTER with a COLT 5 1/2-INCH POLICE REVOLVER: This is a Confederate carried Colt Police 5 1/2-inch barrel revolver with its Confederate brown holster. The leather is in great condition complete with 100% original stitching, original straps and the original belt loop. The revolver fits tight in it. The revolver is 100% complete with matching number 13228 (1862) including the wedge, all original screws and grips. The grip has three carved notches, one on the left side and two on the right. These were a favorite gun for Confederate cavalry! $1900.00

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F237. OHIO IDENTIFED MUSKET: This musket is identified to Private A. S. Workman of the 60th and later 89th Ohio Infantry Regiments. He initially enlisted as a Corporal in the 60th Ohio 1-year regiment and served in Virginia until captured at Harpers Ferry. He returned to Ohio and enlisted as a private in the 89th Ohio infantry and served in Tennessee until discharged for disability. The musket is an earlier conversion version common to many Ohio and early war units. They were issued to many state units since they were in many armories, and in order to get troops on the field of battle as quickly as possible. The lock plate is marked P. & E.R. BLAKE and NEW HAVEN 1830. It has a Cone Conversion; is smooth-bored; has the original ram-rod; and an original tampion (barrel plugs are very rare to find). The gun has OHIO stamped in two locations: one on the side and the other on the top of the stock. Also, on the left side of the stock is stamped A. S. Workman. A search of the Civil War records for Ohio finds only one match. Included is a 97-page binder with historical information.  $3300.00

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F239. BURNSIDE CARBINE -  5TH MODEL  - ILLINOIS SERIAL NUMBER RANGE: This is a 5th model Burnside carbine, which was discovered in Illinois. It retains a little case coloring on the outside of the breach and a pleasing brown patina on the barrel. The gun was discovered in Illinois and its serial number “13976” falls between the number 13957 – 13982, which were issued to the 6th Volunteer Illinois cavalry. The walnut stock is in excellent condition with two strong cartouches on the right side. The barrel is bright with strong rifling and a small amount of surface pitting. While at the recent Colorado Gun Collector show in Denver, I saw lessor quality Burnside Carbines selling between $1500 - $1800, and they did not match the quality of this gun. This is a great price for a gun in this condition. $1700.00

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TEXAS - SAVAGE NAVY REVOLVER, CONFEDERATE CAPTURE WITH CONFEDERATE HOLSTER

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F241. SHARPS AND HANKINS MODEL 1862 ARMY INSPECTED CARBINE: This is an Army Sharps & Hankins Carbine. It is a bare-barreled, 52 caliber breechloader gun produced by the Sharps and Hankins Company, Philadelphia. The carbines (all variants) were made between 1862-1865 with an approximate total of 8,000 produced in 4 variants:-

19" barrel Army cavalry carbine
24" barrel Army cavalry carbine (500)
24" leather covered barrel Navy carbine
32 3/4" barrel Army rifle

By official records, the Army purchased approximately 200 “Army Model” carbines from the estimated 500 produced. The 52 caliber rimfire carbine employed a metal cartridge which was loaded by sliding the barrel forward using a loading lever on the underside, secured by a small latch inside the lever which can be awkward to operate. Standard features include a brass butt-plate; iron loading lever; unique hinged sight; a metal forearm, which is an extension of the block; a single strap hook on the butt, and a rifled bore with 12 lands & grooves.

The 9th New York Cavalry rearmed in September 1862 and most of the soldiers carried a Sharps & Hankins at Gettysburg and other engagements until the end of the war.

This carbine markings include matching serial number 6312 with "SHARPS / & / HANKINS / PHILADA" on the right side and "SHARPS / PATENT / 1859" on the left side with a rarely seen Government inspection mark P over G G. The lower receiver retains a good amount of original case-coloring blue, with brown undertones, which match the brown patina barrel. The walnut stock shows some expected wear, but looks great! Also, the gun retains the original rear adjustable site and the safety lever, and the bore is in near-mint bright condition. Considering only 500 of these carbines were made and 200 were purchased by the government, of which most if not all went to the 9th New York Cavalry, this is a rare gun! $1750.00

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LORENZ RIFLE – CONFEDERATE CARRIED

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F243. GALLAGER CARBINE – POSSIBLY TENNESSEE ISSUED: The Gallager carbine is an American black powder breechloading rifle produced in the American Civil War. The weapon was designed by Mahlon J. Gallager, and on 31 August 1861 the first weapons were sold to the Army. The Gallager was loaded from the rear with brass cases, which contained the projectile and the propellant. Covered by a disc made of greased felt, the projectile was inserted in the barrel after it was tilted up by a lever, followed by the case, and (like the concurrent muzzleloaders, such as the Springfield) were ignited by percussion cap, which was placed on the bolt face. The brass cases had a paper patch in the base, to prevent powder seepage and still allow the cap to fire the round. The weapon was 0.525 in (13.3 mm) caliber with a 22 in (56 cm) barrel. The rifle was strongly made, but unpopular with troops. Frequently, the cases stuck due to expansion of the front part and had to be laboriously removed.

A total of 17,782 were sold to the U.S. Army, and Springfieldarmory tacking records show a large quantity of Gallager were issued to Tennessee soldiers. The serial number on this gun is 9269, which falls between 9056 & 9347 which went to Company A, 4th Tennessee Mounted Infantry and highly probable the gun went to another Tennessee Mounted Unit.

This gun has a nice look with much original finish and a pleasing brown patina. The barrel is bright with a minty bore. On the stocksleft side are the initial A E J (inverted & reversed) and on the right side more initial "J E ?? S" which may be the soldiers last name. Obvious, the soldier was illiterate and did not know how to properly write, but there is enough information to start a data-base search for a last name with these initials.

Searching all the Tennessee Mounted units, I found one only one possible match: Private Alexander Jeffreys, 6th Tennessee Mounted Infantry Regiment. He is the only soldier with a last name with the beginning letters J E and ending letter S.

The 6th Tennessee Mounted Infantry Regiment was organized October 24, 1864 at Chattanooga; mustered out June 30, 1865, at Nashville, Tennessee. The regiment was employed in scouting the Cumberland Mountains in Tennessee and North Georgia after the numerous guerrilla bands which infested the region.

The firstmention of the regiment in the Official Records was dated November 30, 1864, at the time when General Steedman, with the major portion of his command, was preparing to join Major General George H. Thomas for the defense of Nashville against General Hood’s invasion. On this date, Lieutenant Colonel Gowin was ordered to send 130 men at daybreak on December 1 to Cleveland, Tennessee, where they were to report to Colonel Boughton, commanding the post.

On March 11, 1865, the regiment wasdirected to report, by letter, to Major General Steedman, Commanding Districtof the Etowah. In April, 80 men, under Major Bean, were reported as part of an expedition to Dalton and Spring Place, Georgia, and to the Coosawattie River, lasting from April 1-4, in the course of which there were several skirmishes with guerrillas. On June 18, 1865, the regiment was ordered to Nashville, and was mustered out June 30, 1865.  Considering the late enlistment and the short history of the unit, it is no wounder this gun is in such nice condition. More research pending.  $1900.00

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F244. COLT MODEL 1860 ARMY REVOLVER – 1862 SERIAL NUMBER & MISSOURI ISSUED: This is an early Civil War Colt Model 1860 Army Revolver. It has a nice even brown patina, is all original, retains great cylinder scene, and functions properly. Its serial number is 70350 and is a complete matched gun to include the wedge. Its production year is 1862. Inspector initial "D" is found on the left side of the barrel just to the right of the wedge screw, "K" on the right side, "P" on the rebated portion behind the cylinder, and an "H" behind the trigger guard bow and "K" on top of the steel back strap. There is no visible cartouche on the grip, but that is not unusual for early guns since they were being shipped quickly for the war. The Colt Model 1860 Army revolver was the primary handgun issued to the Federal cavalry during the Civil War. This revolver is 1 of a shipment of 1,000 shipped to the Commanding Officer, Major F.D. Callender, St. Louis Arsenal, St. Louis, Mo. on November 7, 1862, and most likely issued to a Missouri cavalry unit. Missouri issued guns are rare to find! $2650.00

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F245. CONFEDERATE ENFIELD – PATTERN 1858 BAR ON BAND RIFLE:  This is an extremely rare Confederate rifle. It is an 1858 Bar on Band Enfield rifle with iron mounts making it an early Confederate purchase. It is also double-marked with the Crown S H C for Sinclair, Hamilton & Company. This mark was their second stamped used.

The stock iscomplete with no breaks, but there is a period chip above the double Crown S H C mark. All the steel has a nice pleasing patina. The rifling is very strong. The Crown SCH marks can be viewed without magnification. The lock is dated 1861. The nipple protector is present, but the chain is broken. Opposite the lock plate side is the letters WF and a N. All the original bands are complete with swivels, and the bar on the top band for the bayonet. Here is your change to own a rare Confederate rifle. $4400.00

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