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    F117.   CONFEDERATE - CONVERSION MUSKET This is an outstanding example of a Confederate converted musket. The lock, bolster are very unique and not of a Northern design. In fact, when you remove the barrel and the lock you will find the Confederate arsenal assembly marks on several parts on the wood under the lock; on the underside of the barrel; and on three of the internal lock parts.  This was a common practice associated with many Confederate repaired and altered musket. The ram-rod has a cork screw twist that is often seen in other Confederate muskets.$1500.00

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    F120.  PLYMOUTH RIFLE: This is a Plymouth Rifle produced by Whitney. The rifle is complete with its original rear site, ram-rod, and all factory parts, and has an even brown patina. The stock has no issues. The sling swivels are present, but the front is frozen. The lock works in both half & full cock, and is dated 1864. The US and Whitneyville marks are faint but I do not see an eagle stamp. The tang on the barrel has the serial number 9989, and there is still good rifling.$1400.00

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    F232. CONFEDERATE CAPTURED & ARSENAL REPAIRED AND REISSUED CONTRACT M1860 RIFLE: During the Civil War, the Confederates would salvage supplies off the battlefield and send weapons to their arsenals to be refurbished and reissued to Southern troops, this is one such Model 1860 contract rifle: an 1862 dated Bridgesburg rifle. The Confederate Arsenal work includes an Austrian Lorenz hammer, a common Confederate blade rear site, different barrel bands held in place by screws, and a Confederate made ram-rod.  On the butt of the stock are inlays, to which the meanings are unknow; they could be either Union or Confederate. The nipple has been replaced. The rifling is faint and all but fired smooth; which is another indication of heavy Confederate use. $1300.00

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    F247. PATTERN 1858 BAR-ON-BAND ENFIELD RIFLE: This is a British Pattern 1858 Bar-on-Band Enfield Rifle. The gun shows light wear, has a Tower 1861 lock that properly works; has strong rifling; is marked “London Tower 1862” on the stock and two crowns stamped near the trigger tang, and the stock makers information stamped in the ramrod channel. On the opposite side from the lock is the name E. LORTON. $1400.00

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    F250. REMINGTON 1858 NEW MODEL REVOLVER: This Remington 1858 New Model Revolver has been professionally refinished. It is complete with all original parts to include wood grips; a cartouche on the left grip; serial number 56886 on the barrel and the frame; good rifling; original nipples; and it properly functions. This Remington revolver looks great and is ready for action! $1600.00

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    F280.CONFEDERATE CLEANED,REPAIRED & REISSUED MUSKET: As is well documented, the Confederate military recovered weapons off battle fields and returned them to armories and arsenals to be cleaned, repaired and reissued.  Guns that went to Richmond have been identified with inspection marks, but there are many others recovered in other battle areas that exist; this is one of those guns.  It is very unique for several reasons: a Potts & Hunt London lock; a London barrel; an 1861 Springfield style hammer; an original cork and brass tampion; a Sinclair, Hamilton & Company Crown of SHG4 and an Oval JC marked stock; an original 27 3/4-inch ramrod; and an original nipple protector with chain.  On the stock is carved the Confederate Soldiers initials B R I and a Confederate battle flag on the opposite side. There are 9 Confederate soldiers with these initials; however, without more information it is unknown which carried this rifle. This is a very affordable Confederate rifle and will look great in any collection, especially one dedicated to Confederate cavalry. No additional cost for shipping. $1080.00

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    F284. REMINGTON 1861 OLD MODEL REVOLVER: This is a Remington 1861 Old Model revolver in original condition with no alterations. When this gun was produced, it was designed so a soldier could remove the cylinder without lowering the level; however, the designed was flawed and the US governments sent many back to be modified. This example was not modified and is a rare find. It is serial number 1974, which places it in the range of gun shipped to the 6th New York Cavalry, a unit with a rich combat history.  The gun has a gray brown finish; property functions; retains original grip that have an inspection cartouche on each side, and a blade front site. Overall, this is a great example of a rare early Civil War Remington revolver. Shipping is included at this price.  $1975.00

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    F215. M1854 LEFAUCHEUX PIN-FIRE REVOLVER: The Pin-Fire revolver was a new invention at the time of the Civil War, and the Lefaucheux revolver made in France was the version of choice. During the Civil War several states to include Kansas, Colorado, Ohio and Missouri ordered close to 1500, while the United State government purchased just over 24,000. The Confederacy also purchased several, but the exact number and serial number range for the Southern acquired pin-fire revolvers is unknown. This is not a Northern contractred purchased gun. This gun is complete with the original unloading rod and cylinder latch; is tight; retains all original screws; lanyard-ring; and original finished grips. The 6 1/4 inch barrel gun is engraved the top and side. It is Lefaucheux maker marked with an early low serial number LF 7727. Shipping is included in this price.  $1075.00

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    F229. MANHATTAN NAVY SERIES REVOLVER: Manhattan Fire Arms Co. was founded in 1856 specifically to capitalize on the soon to be expired Colt patents in 1857. This strategy worked very well for the company and they began by making high quality copies of both Colts and other popular pistols with expired patents. In fact, Manhattan’s copies of Colts were so close that Colt tried to kill their production with a lawsuit, even though their patent had expired. Quite obviously, this pistol is a direct and quality copy of the Colt 1851 Navy. Manhattan revolvers were very well received by the public. The company never received U.S. military contract, except for a small delivery, most likely on the regimental level. Nevertheless, many Manhattan revolvers found themselves on Civil War battlefields, purchased privately by officers and soldiers.This gun shows wear and the five distinct cylinder scenes are faint. The action is tight; both half and full cock works; the cylinder indexes properly; the trigger is crisp, the bore's lands & groves are sharp; it has a 6 1/2 inch barrel; and serial number 4900. $1100.00

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    F239. BURNSIDE CARBINE -  5TH MODEL  - ILLINOIS SERIAL NUMBER RANGE: This is a 5th model Burnside carbine, which was discovered in Illinois. It retains a little case coloring on the outside of the breach and a pleasing brown patina on the barrel. The gun was discovered in Illinois and its serial number “13976” falls between the number 13957 – 13982, which were issued to the 6th Volunteer Illinois cavalry. The walnut stock is in excellent condition with two strong cartouches on the right side. The barrel is bright with strong rifling and a small amount of surface pitting. While at the recent Colorado Gun Collector show in Denver, I saw lessor quality Burnside Carbines selling between $1500 - $1800, and they did not match the quality of this gun. This is a great price for a gun in this condition. $1700.00

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    F248. KERR REVOLVER: Kerr revolvers are very temperamental, but this one properly cycles when the hammer is cocked. It has a pleasing gray patina with traces of original blue. The serial number 11146, is matched on frame and cylinder. The gun also has all the proper proof marks with L.A.C. on the barrel. The wood grips are complete, but the lanyard ring is missing. $2900.00

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    F259. SMITH & WESSON MODEL-TWO REVOLVER: One of the more popular Civil War period revolvers used by cavalry soldiers and officers was the Smith & Wesson Model-Two revolver. The Model Two Army was perfectly suited to the demands for a belt-sized pistol, which could be carried in the waistband or a small holster. It could be quickly loaded with the new waterproof metallic cartridge and proved ideal for the soldier. The timing was crucial, as the first guns reached the marketplace in June of 1861, only two months after the first shots were fired marking the beginning of the American Civil War. Orders rose so fast that by 1862 the company closed its order books, because they already had orders for more arms than they could produce in the next three years.  The gun used a small .32 rim fire caliber self-contained cartridge. This guns serial number, 11134 places in the range of the Type 4 version serial range 10627 - 40044; 1863. The gun has a 6-inch barrel and originally was blued, which is all gone leaving a gray-brown patina. The serial number matches on all parts to include the grip. The gun cylinder timing, and the trigger and hammer properly function, and the bore has strong rifling. Shipping is included with this price. $675.00  

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    F263. CONFEDERATE KERR REVOLVERDuring the Civil War, the South imported many weapons from England to include Kerr revolvers. The majority of those purchased under Confederate contracts were inspected and stamped with a JS Anchor and have a serial number between 1019 & 9975, but there are some outside this range. This Kerr revolver came out of a pre-internet collection and is a newly discovered JS-Anchor marked revolver with serial number 7016, which matches on the frame and cylinder. The gun is all original and complete. The action properly works, but is a little soft; it has a pleasing even brown patina; proof marks on the barrel and cylinder, and the maker name is on the metal grip plate. The original wood grip is tight and complete with a strong legible JS-Anchor; and retains the two base-plate screws and lanyard ring. $4400.00

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    F265. BURNSIDE CARBINE – 18th PA CAVALRY: This Burnside Carbine is Serial number 4726, which is 2 digits from a known 18th PA cavalry carbine: # 4728 CO L 18TH PENNA VOL CAV.  As a result, the chances this gun went to the same unit is extremely high, and it was at Gettysburg. To see the history for this unit, look at the photos and click the Pennsylvania state seal. The carbine is in great shape with no rust or pitting. The metal has a nice even gray patina and the stock show wear from being carried, but well maintain. On the right side you can see two cartouche marks. The gun properly functions, has strong rifling, and the take-down pin is complete. $1800.00

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    F268. CONFEDERATE - FAYETTEVILLE RIFLE, TYPE IV: This is an original Confederate Fayetteville rifle in great condition. There are no issued with the stock, the lock properly functions, and all brass fittings are original. The lock is dated 1863, has the eagle over CSA, and FAYETTEVILLE, and the CSA is also stamped on the butt plate. The two brass barrel bands have the U mark, and the top retains the sling ring., but the sling ring of the trigger guard is missing. The barrel has great untouched patina and a Confederate blade rear site, but not visible rifling due to heavy use. Overall, a truly untouched example of an iconic Confederate made rifle! $8500.00

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    F269. CONFEDERATE P1860-ENFIELD RIFLE - GAR PAINTED: This is an original Confederate P-1860 2-band, 5-groved rifle with a 1,100 yard site, which has GAR (Grand Army of the Republic) gold paint on all the metal parts, which indicates this gun was displayed in a GAR hall as a war trophy. The stock and barrel are maker marked Isaac Hollis & Sons, and there is a Confederate Proof mark by the front on the trigger guard. The stock is complete with expected wear and dings, and the lock plate is dates 1861 and properly functions in both half & full cock. The bore is shot out and only a trace of the rifling exists. Another unique feature is that the barrel is plugged with lead at the bottom rendering the gun inoperable, which was most likely done when the gun was captured.  Here is a great example of a Confederate weapon brought home by a Union soldier and proudly displayed in a GAR hall. Shipping is included. $800.00

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    F270. CONFEDERATE P1860-ENFIELD RIFLE: This 2-band P1860 Rifle is a great example of a Confederate carried weapon and shows expected wear and use. It is original with no breaks or repairs; the bore is 5-groved; the bayonet lug has been period file down; front site intact; rear site missing the blade; undated tower lock; no rear sling swivel; action hold in both half and full cock, but very soft. The initials MMV are carved in the stock, which was common a Confederate gun. There are 8 Confederate soldiers with these initial, but unknown which one. I can not find any marks near the butt plate or trigger tang, and the ramrod is missing in action. $900.00

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    F206. CONFEDERATE 1853 ENFIELD RIFLE - SINCLAIR, HAMILTON & COMPANY MARKED:  During the Civil War, a large number of 1853 Enfield Rifle Muskets were supplied by the Sinclair, Hamilton & Company and are found with the following marks:

     

    This Confederate 1853 3-band Enfield is in near-mint condition with the Oval SCH mark.  This gun was discovered in Mississippi and most likely was carried by a soldier from that state. The rifle is all original with great un-touched brown patina on all steel parts; a dark brown stock; and matching assembly numbers. There is a wood knot in the stock, which appears on both sides of the barrel. This show that quality control was not and issue. Also, the photo lighting make it look lighter then it is and the photos of the markings is correct. The stock is maker marked JOHN  MARSON and XX III (23) in the ram-rob channel. The barrel is maker marked SMITH and the number 23 twice. The lock is maker marked SMITH and the number 23, and both lock retention screws are marked XX III (23). Also, all three barrel bands are numbered 23, and the only part with a different number is the barrel retention screw with the mark X\ //. The front site is worn down.  

    The Oval SHC mark is by the butt plate tang, on the flat area opposite the lock, and between the top barrel band and brass nose cap there is the silhouette of a large oval with the SHC worn and difficult to see.  This third mark is extremely rare! The rifle still retains the original rear sight, and there remains good rifling in the bore. $2900.00

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    F228.  CONFEDERATE 1853 3-BAND ENFIELD RIFLE – SCRIPT JS WITHIN A CIRCLEThis gun is dated 1861, has the script JS Circle mark located by the butt-plate tang, and is in great attic condition. The recently published book “The English Connection” outlines the different viewer marks on Confederate Enfield rifles, and the script JS within a circle is one of those marks. Though a little faint, is visible on this gun. The stock is solid with expect dings; the lock function in both half and full cock; the nipple and ram-rod are original; the barrel is properly marked; and all parts have matching assemble marks ////; and the patina on all the metal is a deep brown. There is no rear site. The bore is dark, but the rifling is strong. Also, another Confederate feature is the sling swivel have been removed since slings were in short supply. $1400.00

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    F233. CONFEDERATE 1853 3-BAND ENFIELD RIFLE – SL WITHIN A CIRCLE: The recently published book “The English Connection” outline the different viewer marks on Confederate Enfield rifles, and the block SL within a circle is one of those marks, which is located by the butt-plate tang. At the time of publication, only two examples of the block SL within a circle were known. This rifle is in amazing condition: it retains the original finish on the stock; The barrel and barrel-bands have a deep patina; the ramrod is original; the Circle SL mark is strong; both sling swivels are complete, and the lock is dated 1861. The bore is shot smooth indicating heavy, but the gun was well maintained. These early war Enfield dated 1861 with a Confederate Circle SL viewer mark are extremely rare to find, especially in this condition. $3500.00

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    F237. OHIO IDENTIFED MUSKET: This musket is identified to Private A. S. Workman of the 60th and later 89th Ohio Infantry Regiments. He initially enlisted as a Corporal in the 60th Ohio 1-year regiment and served in Virginia until captured at Harpers Ferry. He returned to Ohio and enlisted as a private in the 89th Ohio infantry and served in Tennessee until discharged for disability. The musket is an earlier conversion common to many early war units. The lock plate is marked P. & E.R. BLAKE and NEW HAVEN 1830 with a cone conversion; a smooth-bored; the original ram-rod; and an original wood tampion (barrel plugs are very rare to find). The gun has OHIO stamped in two locations: one on the side and the other on the top of the stock. Also, on the left side of the stock is stamped A. S. Workman. A search of the Civil War records for Ohio finds only one match. Included is a 97-page binder with historical information.  $2900.00

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    F257. CONFEDERATE – BARNETT 1853 ENFIELD RIFLE: This is an original Confederate Barnett 1853 3-band rifle with a Circle CH1 inspection mark by the butt plate tang. The condition is superb for an early Confederate rifle. The Barnett London marked lock is crisp in both half and full cock positions. The stock has sharp edges on both sides of the lock plate with no breaks or cracks. The barrel retains much of its original finish and has a great look with strong rifling. The barrel-bands are original, both sling swivels are present, and the rear site is complete and works. On the butt of the stock are the initials W A T B. These initials are believed to be a combination of a unit’s name (W A) and the soldiers initials (T B). The letters W A are often associated with the Washington Light Artillery, but there is another New Orleans unit with the same initials; Watson Light Artillery. I searched the data base for both units and the only possible matched are Thomassin Brignac and T Brennan, both served in the Watson Light Artillery. This is a great Confederate Enfield rifle, which saw action but was not abused. $3800.00

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    “A” “Q” & “Z”

    F261. CLEANED & REPAIRED “A” “Q” & “Z” MARKED B FLAGG & Co. CONFEDERATE REISSUED MUSKETBeginning with the Severn Days Battle in 1862, weapons were salvaged and sent to Richmond to be cleaned, repaired and reissued. The Confederate Ordnance Bureau established a robust cleaning and repair (C&R) operation at the Richmond, Danville, Lynchburg Arsenals, and the Staunton Ordnance Depot.  Once a gun was serviceable, it would be inspected and marked with an inspector’s mark: “A”,”F”,”Q”,”T”, and “Z” an average of .22 inches in height, the same font, and located on the bottom of the stock forward of the trigger guard. For more information see “Captured & Collected” Confederate Reissued Firearms by CAPT Steven W, Knott. This musket is one of the early muskets recovered from a battlefield and sent to be Cleared and Repaired.

    The US M-1842 Muskets produced by Benjamin Flagg are amongthe rarest and most intriguing military long arms produced in the United Statesduring the antebellum era. The guns are actually secondary Confederate arms, as all were delivered to the state of South Carolina, and were the forerunners of the South Carolina manufactured William Glaze & Company arms, as Glaze ordered the Flagg guns for South Carolina and then enlisted Flagg in the subsequent manufacture of his own arms. Originally, there were 100 muskets delivered with B. FLAGG & Co. locks. They had a German silver wrist escutcheon with a number engraved on it; a butt plate either blank or with a script US; and a smooth bore barrel. Several South Carolina infantry regiments were present at the battle of First Manassas and it is likely this musket was recovered and sent back to Richmond to be Cleaned and Repaired. As such, it can no longer be considered an original condition B Flagg musket, but a Confederate (C&R) reissued gun.

    This musket went thought the Clean & Repair (C&R) three times and it looks like the Flagg lock was fitted onto a different M-1842stock and then a different barrel, which was rifled. Each time the gun entered the C&R process it was inspected before being reissued. I believe the first inspection mark was “A” because of its location matches other one-time C&R guns, next “Z” and finally “Q.” The B. Flagg & Co. lock’s action is crisp and very tight in both halt and full cock positions. I pulled the lock and the internal lock area is dark and undisturbed. Also, the bore is bright with strong rifling. and when the barrel bands are moved you see the bright metal that is expected with an unaltered musket.  This gun is extremely unique and rare with the B Flagg lock and being through the Confederate Clean & Repair process three times.  $3200.00

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    "Q"

    F262. COLT “Q” MARKED, CLEANED & REPAIRED CONFEDERATE REISSUED RIFLEBeginning with the Severn Days Battle in 1862, weapons were salvaged and sent to Richmond to be cleaned, repaired and reissued. The Confederate Ordnance Bureau established a robust cleaning and repair (C&R) operation at the Richmond, Danville, Lynchburg Arsenals, and the Staunton Ordnance Depot.  Once a gun was serviceable, it would be inspected and marked with an inspector’s mark: “A”,”F”,”Q”,”T”, and “Z” an average of .22 inches in height, the same font, and located on the bottom of the stock forward of the trigger guard. For more information see “Captured & Collected” Confederate Reissued Firearms by CAPT Steven W, Knott. This musket is one of the early muskets recovered from a battlefield and sent to be Cleared and Repaired.

    This Colt rifle dated 1864 is obvious a late war battlefield pickup that went thought the Clean &Repair (C&R) process at a Richmond location. On its underside forward of the trigger there is a “Q” inspection mark. Upon examination, you can see that the barrel was shortened and the front site moved. This gun is in near-mint condition and an outstanding example of a Confederate cleaned and repaired/reissued captured rifle. $2700.00

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    “T.S”

    F266. CONFEDERATE 1853 ENFIELD RIFLE – BLOCK “T.S” MARKED: The is a Confederate 1853 Enfield Rifle with a rare block T.S mark by the butt plate tang. The musket lock is dated 1862, and the butt plate is marked with an A over 45. On the underside forward of the trigger a soldier carved his initials C K.  A quick search of the civil way data-base found over 1000 Confederate soldiers with these initials, but with a little more research it might be possible to find one who served in A company A 45th in the Confederate military. The gun in in great condition with expected wear; the barrel and retention bands have matching patina; the bore has strong rifling; the rear site works; the lock work both half and full cock; and both sling swivels are present.  Here is a rarely seen T.S marked Confederate Enfield rifle. $2300.00

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    F267.H&P ALTERED U.S. MODEL 1822 SPRINGFIELD MUSKET: This H&P Civil War period conversion musket is .69 caliber with a 42" barrel retained by three flat barrel bands with springs. It is browned finish with a smooth walnut stock. It is marked with a {spread-winged eagle} over US forward of the hammer, and in three vertical lines: "SPRING / FIELD / 1830" at the tail of the lock: patent breech marked 1861 and H&P: a clear script "JT" cartouche and an A/2 reclassification cartouche, with a legible script "JS" final inspection cartouche behind the trigger guard. The gun retains the H&P added 1858 pattern leaf rear sight; the H&P added front sight blade on upper band, a socket bayonet lug, and a correctly modified button head ramrod dished for conical ammunition and sling swivels.  The New Jersey firm of Hewes & Phillips altered some 20,000 US Model 1816/22/18 and Model 1835/40 flintlock muskets to percussion during the American Civil War, roughly 8,000 "Type I" rifled and sighted alterations for the state of New Jersey and some 12,000 "Type II" for the US Ordnance Department, most of these being smooth bore. This is a classic "Type I," rifled with three lands and grooves with a clean out screw in the bolster with “NJ” New Jersey markings on the barrel. The gun is in Fine++ condition. Retains some brown finish mixed with an oxidized brown patina; markings in metal are crips and clear; markings in wood slightly worn, but strong. Mechanically functional with a very good bore with the last few inches nearest the muzzle dirty and somewhat pitted. The stock is crisp with sharp edges, showing scattered bumps, dings and mars, some minor hairline grain cracks are present as well, but appear non-structural. $1800.00

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    F272. CONFEDERATE 1853 ENFIELD RIFLE - SINCLAIR, HAMILTON & COMPANY MARKED: During the Civil War, a large number of 1853 Enfield Rifle Muskets were supplied by the Sinclair, Hamilton & Company and are found with the following marks:

    ThisConfederate 1853 3-band Enfield is in excellent++ condition with a Crown SHG3 mark near the butt plate tang and an Oval J C  on the flat opposite the lock. The rifle is all original with a great un-touched light maple brown finish; much original bluing on the barrel, all original barrel bands; both sling swivels, and a bright bore with 100% original rifling; 1862 dated Tower lock, and the original ramrod. There is a flaw in the wood that looks like a crack, but is not. It is a wood knot flaw. In hast, the rear site was put on facing the wrong way, very unusually and rare! This is an outstanding example of the Confederate 1853 Enfield Rifle. $2300.00

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    F285. COLT MODEL 1860 ARMY REVOLVER: This is a Colt model 1860 Army Revolver with all matching serial number #55061. It is 1 of 500 sent to and received by LTC G. D. Ramsay, Washington DC July 23, 1862. Ramsay's was the commander of the Washington Arsenal. The gun has a brown finish; all original screws; all original nipples; original grips with a faint cartouche on the right side; tight action, and I believe a period replaced front site. Early Civil War Colt Army Revolves with all matching parts are hard to find. $1500.00

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