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F98. M1816 CONVERSION RIFLE-MUSKET & BAYONET: This is another M1816 Conversion Rifle-Musket with a rifled bore. M1816 conversion muskets with rifled a rifle bore is an early Civil War gun, and are rare.  I have had this and the other for years.  It is complete with the exception of the ramrod.  I just have not taken it to any shows to find a ramrod. Included is the correct period bayonet with inspection mark US over SC.  The SC is for the inspector and not South Carolina. This is a great piece and at the blow-out price.$950.00

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F99. M1816 CONVERSION MUSKET- RIFLED BORE & 4 HAMMERS: Today, I cleaned out the safe and decided to let go some of my inventory. This is a M1816 conversion musket with a rare rifled bore. A M1816 Rifle-Musket with rifled bore is an early Civil War guns and rare to find.  The rifling is very strong; the stock is solid with no crack, splits, or breaks, and the stock has never been sanded. The original hammer and ramrod are missing, but should easily be replaced.  I have yet to take this to a show, but if I still have it by the end of the year it will be at the Nashville/Franklin TN show where I am sure these two missing parts will be found.  I have also decided to include 4 muskets hammers with this sale. One is for a M1816 conversion musket, but not this gun, the other three are for Flint-lock muskets; notice that one has a forged striker for a conversion musket.  Some believe this is a Confederate made piece. An early flint-lock lock plate is included.  This is being sold as an entire lot. $1600.00

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F117.   M1816 - CONFEDERATE - CONVERSION MUSKETThis is an outstanding example of a Confederate converted M1816 musket. The lock, bolster are very unique and not of a Northern design. In fact, when you remove the barrel and the lock you will find the Roman numeral III marked on several parts.  It is on the wood under the lock, on the underside of the barrel, and on three of the internal lock parts.  This was a common practice associated with many Confederate repaired and altered musket.  The ram-rod has a cork screw twist that is often seen in other Confederate muskets.$2595.00

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F207. STARR .36 CAL. NAVAL REVOLVER: This Starr revolver is a unique revolver developed prior and used during the Civil War.  It was designed with a sliding switch on the trigger to allow the soldier or sailor to use the gun in a double-action configuration, or single-action by cocking it with the main trigger and using a second smaller trigger to fire the gun.  You will see the more common Army version all the time, but the Naval .36 Caliber version is rare to find.  This Navy Starr revolver has a brown-gray patina and only small traces of original blue. The frame is marked Starr Patent Jan. 15. 1856 on one side, and Starr Arms Co. New York on the other side. All screws are original to the gun. The bore has strong rifling and the cylinder has original nipples, and they are all very nice. The cylinder, grip, upper receiver, and lower receiver under the grip have matching serial number 2636, the trigger has number 2372; however, its patina matches the gun and I have no doubt was factory installed.  The one piece grip is in very nice condition, and has a sailor’s name, FORD, carved in it. Overall, this great example of a rare and not often seen Navy Starr Revolver and is a great piece of Civil War naval history.

$1850.00

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F208. M1854 LEFAUCHEUX PIN-FIRE REVOLVER: The Pin-Fire revolver was a new invention at the time of the Civil War, and the Lefaucheux revolver made in France was the version of choice. During the Civil War several states to include Kansas, Colorado, Ohio and Missouri ordered close to 1500, while the United State government purchased just over 24,000. The serial range for the US contract is 25,000 – 37,000, while the state purchased guns are believed to be earlier numbers. This 4 1/2 inch revolver has serial number #33390, which puts it is the middle of the US Government contact.  The gun is complete with the original unloading rod and cylinder latch; is tight; retains all original screws; lanyard-ring; and some original blue finish and original finished grips. The shorter barrel gun is believed to be an officer version similar to those carried by officers of the French Foreign Legion. With a serial number so close to the US Contract range, this revolver could have been purchased by the Government or one of the Northern States.

$1400.00

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F209. SAVAGE NAVY REVOLVER - POSSIBLE CONFEDERATE USAGE: The Savage Navy revolver self-cocking revolver is one of the weirdest, most recognizable and possibly most ungainly handguns of the Civil War era. The .36 caliber, 6-shot revolver had a 7” octagon barrel and a unique action. The gun featured a unique ring shaped cocking lever inside, the heart shaped trigger guard, which was used to advance the cylinder and cock the hammer. The shooter could then fire the gun with the traditional trigger. The gun was the final version of a family of self-cocking revolvers that were built upon the Figure-8 design of JS North. Beyond its unique action, the gun was revolutionary in that it was a “gas seal” revolver. The cylinder moved forward when the action cocked, and a recess in the chamber mouth engaged a tapered forcing cone at the rear of the barrel. The effect was a gas seal between the chamber and the barrel, which practically eliminated the loss of gas and pressure from the usual gap between the barrel and cylinder. This meant that the gas from power charge was more effectively converted into propulsion for the bullet and increased its velocity for a given powder charge, over convectional revolver designs. With the coming of the Civil War, the need for revolvers outweighed any misgivings that the military may have had about the design, and the coveted contracts were almost immediately forthcoming. The state of Massachusetts procured 285 of the Savage revolvers early in the conflict. Additional arms were sold to military outfitters and arms retailers like Schuyler, Hartley & Graham and William Syms & Brothers. Both of these companies sold Savage Navy revolvers to the US government during early 1862, for as much as $25 per gun. The Savage Revolving Firearms Company secured the first US military contract, directly with the US government on October 16, 1861. This contract called for Savage to deliver 5,000 pistols between October 1861 and March 1862 at the price of $20 per revolver. Another contract was received from the government in November of 1861 to supply an additional 5,000 revolvers, at $20 each, between November 1861 and May of 1862. Savage completed their initial contract in a timely fashion, but had trouble delivering the guns from the second contract on the agreed to schedule. The second contract was temporarily voided by the Ordnance Department, but after negotiating with Savage, an agreement was reached where the 4,500 outstanding guns from that contract would be delivered at the lower rate of $19.00 per pistol. The deliveries under the second contract were completed by July of 1862. Of the approximately 20,000 Savage “Navy” models produced during the Civil War the US Ordnance Department took delivery of 11,384 of the guns, and the Navy took delivery of 1,126. The balance of approximately 8,500 guns, were offered for civilian sale, although most those revolvers no doubt ended up seeing action during the war as well. The pistols saw significant field service during the war, and were issued to at least 26 US cavalry regiments and were listed among the arms of some half dozen or more Confederate cavalry regiments. US volunteer cavalry regiments that were issued Savage Navy revolvers included the 6th, 10th & 13th Illinois, the 5th & 15th Kansas, 11th Kentucky, the 3rd, 4th & 7th Missouri, 7th New York 3rd Ohio, 7th Pennsylvania, 1st & 2nd Wisconsin, 1st Vermont and the Potomac Brigade. The revolvers were also issued to the 1st through 9th Missouri State Militia Cavalry. The two regiments who carried the most Savages on their ordnance rolls were the 4th Missouri State Militia Cavalry with 714 and the 2nd Wisconsin with 400. Confederate cavalry units that listed the Savage Navy among their arms were the 11th Texas, 7th Virginia, and the 34th & 35th Virginia Cavalry Battalions.

This is an early martially marked revolver with matching serial number 7849. A cartouche is visible on the left grip. Additionally, there are assembly marks on several parts of the gun, either //// or ****(Dots). Also, the grips are original with serial number 7849 and //// on the inside. These marks may indicate the gun was Confederate captured and arsenal inspected before being place back into service for the South. Overall it is a brown gun, but there is trace original blue and some case coloring on the ram-rod housing part and other parts. The gun is tight and is fully operational, and the cylinder timing is correct. This pistol is mechanically excellent and functions exactly as it should in every way. The top strap of the revolver is clearly marked in three lines:

SAVAGER.F.A. Co. MIDDLETOWN, CT
H.S. NORTH PATENTED JUNE 17 1856
JANUARY 10 1859. MAY 15 1860

$3400.00

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F210: WHITNEY NAVY REVOLVER -SCARCE 1ST TYPE, 2ND MODEL:  The most famous and easily recognized revolver manufactured by Eli Whitney, Jr. was his Navy Model. This revolver came on the scene just prior to the War Between the States.  An improved second model was developed as the War began and sales increased as Whitney worked to market his revolver.  The Navy Model is 36 caliber with a standard barrel length of 7 5/8 inches. The term “Navy” referred to the caliber and size of the revolver. These revolvers were purchased by both the US Army and Navy. Approximately 35,500 Whitney Navy revolvers were manufactured, including about 1,500 of the First Model and approximately 34,000 of the Second Model. Both models went through a few improvements, resulting in four “types” of the First Model; and five “types” of the Second Model.  Whitney used a unique cylinder scene that included a Shield with half of it being the US Stars & Stripes and half being the English Coat of Arms. Facing the shield on either side was an American Eagle and England’s Trafalgar Lion. This scene covered one side of the cylinder and was duplicated on the other side. Later, one side of the cylinder was replaced with a Naval scene with an American Shield with a ribbon across the shield.  On the ribbon is written “Whitneyville”. Whitney obtained a contract with the US Army in 1862, and provided about 7,602 revolvers through 1863. The Army also obtained Whitney revolvers through other private vendors as well, resulting in over 10,000 Whitney Navy revolvers being used by the Army. The US Navy purchased 6,226 Whitney revolvers during 1863-1865. About 50% of the 34,000 Second Models were purchased by Army & Navy.

This is a fantastic early example of a Whitney Navy Revolver that dates just prior to the beginning of the Civil War and is one of the nicest early 2nd Models I have seen in a long time. The Second Model was Whitney's response to improvements needed to the fragile First model. It featured a thicker top strap on the frame, a brass trigger guard, and rounded grip panels. There are 5 distinct variations or "types" of 2nd Models, this one being the first and most desirable variation with the ball-type loading lever catch and the single safety notch on the back of the cylinder. The gun has all matching numbers throughout (1842) to include the grips, and the top of barrel is marked "E. WHITNEY N HAVEN" and has a Naval anchor stamped at the barrels base. The grips each have a strong cartouche, and sub-contract inspector marks are on many of the visible gun parts. The action is tight and properly works, all the nipples are original, and the rifling is strong. The gun has a pleasing gray-brown patina. If you've been looking for a nice example of an early Whitney revolver with that elusive single safety notch on the cylinder, this is an exceptional example in great condition!

$2600.00

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F211. COLT 1851 NAVY REVOLVER, 1858: This is a good solid example of a Colt 1851 Navy Revolver that was built in 1858, and marked with the Hartford Address, which only appeared on this model from approx. 1858 up to April 1861.  Many collectors feel the Colt revolvers with the Hartford address have a strong association to the Confederacy. It has the standard 7-1/2" octagonal barrel with six shot cylinder and walnut grips. There appears to be a factory error with the serial number because 87789 appears on all parts to include the grip, except for one part numbered 88789. These numbers are within the same production time frame, and the die-stamped numbers are the same; human error.  Even the fragile hand-inked number on the inside of the grips is still visible and matching; 87789. There is still some trace silver on some brass, and some original blue on the underside of the loading lever. Overall the gun is brown. The cylinder scene is visible as well as the COLT PATENT No. 88789. The nipples are to perfict and I believe they have beenreplaces. The rifling is strong and the action is tight.

$2750.00  

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F212. COLT 1861 NAVY REVOLVER-1863: This Colt 1861 Navy revolver is serial number 13821, which places its production in 1863 and in the middle of the Civil War. Overall, it is a light-brown gun with faint traces of case coloring on the sides, with the same serial number 13821 on all parts except the wedge, which is unmarked. The gun is tight and the action properly works. The cylinder scene is strong and all the nipples are original. The grips are original with almost all the factory finish. The barrel has some light pitting on each side where it had contact with a holster. The bore is bright with no pitting and strong rifling. This is a great example of a Civil War Colt 1861 Navy revolver.

$2600.00

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F213. STARR .36 CAL. NAVAL REVOLVER: This Starr revolver is a unique revolver developed prior and used during the Civil War.  It was designed with a sliding switch on the trigger to allow the soldier or sailor to use the gun in a double-action configuration, or single-action by cocking it with the main trigger and using a second smaller trigger to fire the gun.  You will see the more common Army version all the time, but the Naval .36 Caliber version is rare to find.  This Navy Starr revolver has a gray-brown patina and only small traces of original blue. The frame is marked Starr Patent Jan. 15. 1856 on one side, and Starr Arms Co. New York on the other side. All screws are original to the gun. The bore has strong rifling, the cylinder nipples appear original, the original grip has a trace cartouche on the left side, and the upper and lower receiver, as well the grip, has matching serial number 2294. Overall, this is a great example of a rare and not often seen Navy Starr Revolver.

$1850.00

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