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F117.   CONFEDERATE - CONVERSION MUSKET This is an outstanding example of a Confederate converted musket. The lock, bolster are very unique and not of a Northern design. In fact, when you remove the barrel and the lock you will find the Confederate arsenal assembly marks on several parts on the wood under the lock; on the underside of the barrel; and on three of the internal lock parts.  This was a common practice associated with many Confederate repaired and altered musket. The ram-rod has a cork screw twist that is often seen in other Confederate muskets.$1475.00

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F120.  PLYMOUTH RIFLE: This is a Plymouth Rifle produced by Whitney. The rifle is complete with its original rear site, ram-rod, and all factory parts, and has an even brown patina. The stock has no issues. The sling swivels are present, but the front is frozen. The lock works in both half & full cock, and is dated 1864. The US and Whitneyville marks are faint but I do not see an eagle stamp. The tang on the barrel has the serial number 9989, and there is still good rifling.$1375.00

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CONFEDERATE 1853 ENFIELD RIFLE - SINCLAIR, HAMILTON & COMPANY MARKED

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F215. M1854 LEFAUCHEUX PIN-FIRE REVOLVER: The Pin-Fire revolver was a new invention at the time of the Civil War, and the Lefaucheux revolver made in France was the version of choice. During the Civil War several states to include Kansas, Colorado, Ohio and Missouri ordered close to 1500, while the United State government purchased just over 24,000. The Confederacy also purchased several, but the exact number and serial number range for the Southern acquired pin-firerevolvers is unknown. This is not a Northern contracted purchased gun. This gun is complete with the original unloading rod andcylinder latch; is tight; retains all original screws; lanyard-ring; and original finished grips. The 6 1/4 inch barrel gun is engraved the top and side. It is Lefaucheux maker marked with an early low serial number LF 7727. Shipping is included in this price.  $895.00

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F229. MANHATTAN NAVY SERIES REVOLVER: Manhattan Fire Arms Co. was founded in 1856 specifically to capitalize on the soon to be expired Colt patents in 1857. This strategy worked very well for the company and they began by making high quality copies of both Colts and other popular pistols with expired patents. In fact, Manhattan’s copies of Colts were so close that Colt tried to kill their production with a lawsuit, even though their patent had expired. Quite obviously, this pistol is a direct and quality copy of the Colt 1851 Navy. Manhattan revolvers were very well received by the public. The company never received U.S. military contract, except for a small delivery, most likely on the regimental level. Nevertheless, many Manhattan revolvers found themselves on Civil War battlefields, purchased privately by officers and soldiers.This gun shows wear and the five distinct cylinder scenes are faint. The action is tight; both half and full cock works; the cylinder indexes properly; the trigger is crisp, the bore's lands & groves are sharp; it has a 6 1/2 inch barrel; and serial number 4900. $1195.00

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F232. CONFEDERATE CAPTURED & ARSENAL REPAIRED AND REISSUED CONTRACT M1861 RIFLE: During the Civil War, the Confederates would salvage supplies off the battlefield and send weapons to their arsenals to be refurbished and reissued to Southern troops, this is one such Model 1861 contract rifle: an 1862 dated Bridgesburg rifle. The Confederate Arsenal work includes an Austrian Lorenz hammer, a common Confederate blade rear site, different barrel bands held in place by screws, and a Confederate made ram-rod.  On the butt of the stock are inlays, to which the meanings are unknow; they could be either Union or Confederate. The nipple has been replaced. The rifling is faint and all but fired smooth; which is another indication of heavy Confederate use. $1300.00

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F237. OHIO IDENTIFED MUSKET: This musket is identified to Private A. S. Workman of the 60th and later 89th Ohio Infantry Regiments. He initially enlisted as a Corporal in the 60th Ohio 1-year regiment and served in Virginia until captured at Harpers Ferry. He returned to Ohio and enlisted as a private in the 89th Ohio infantry and served in Tennessee until discharged for disability. The musket is an earlier conversion common to many early war units. The lock plate is marked P. & E.R. BLAKE and NEW HAVEN 1830 with a cone conversion; a smooth-bored; the original ram-rod; and an original wood tampion (barrel plugs are very rare to find). The gun has OHIO stamped in two locations: one on the side and the other on the top of the stock. Also, on the left side of the stock is stamped A. S. Workman. A search of the Civil War records for Ohio finds only one match. Included is a 97-page binder with historical information.  $2900.00

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F247. PATTERN 1858 BAR-ON-BAND ENFIELD RIFLE: This is a British Pattern 1858 Bar-on-Band Enfield Rifle. The gun shows light wear, has a Tower 1861 lock that properly works; has strong rifling; is marked “London Tower 1862” on the stock and two crowns stamped near the trigger tang, and the stock makers information stamped in the ramrod channel. On the opposite side from the lock is the name E. LORTON. $1700.00

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F252. CONFEDERATE - PATTERN 1860 IRON MOUNTED RIFLE & NUMBERED RAMROD: This is a Pattern 1860 2-band rifle. It is a London made gun by Potts & Hunt and has all original factory mounts, screws, barrel and barrel bands. There is a faint Confederate viewer mark near the trigger tang, which may be from Sinclair, Hamilton & Company. The ramrod is number 507 and was with the gun when acquired, but there are no numbers on the stock. It most likely was switched during the heat of battle. On the underside of the stock forward of the trigger guard is a hole. The lock properly functions; all metal parts have matching patina, and the rifling is gone and now has a smooth bore. There are no sling swivels and where one would be to the rear, there is a screw. This gun originally was configured for the Royal Marine Corps, but has not British inspection marks and it was sold to the Confederacy instead. A bayonet comes with the gun. It is British inspected, has an oval C.G maker mark and serial number 151, but I do not know how long the two have been together. $1900.00

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PLEASE CLICK ON THE LOUISIANA STATE SEAL TO READ THE HISTORICAL FILE

F257. LOUISIANIA IDENTIFIED - CONFEDERATE – BARNETT 1853 ENFIELD RIFLE: This is an original Confederate Barnett 1853 3-band rifle with a Circle CH1 inspection mark by the butt plate tang. The condition is superb for an early Confederate rifle. The Barnett London marked lock is crisp in both half and full cock positions. The stock has sharp edges on both sides of the lock plate with no breaks or cracks. The barrel retains much of its original finish and has a great look with strong rifling. The barrel-bands are original, both sling swivels are present, and the rear site is complete and works. On the butt of the stock are the initials W. A. T. B. A search of the National Park Service records and the American Civil War Research database found one, and only one positive match: Private W.A.T. Bartlett. Additionally, his muster sheets are on file and verify the use of these initials. 

Private Bartlett enlisted in Company E, 5 th Louisiana Infantry and was involved in several engagements until he was wounded in the shoulder and captured in action on 17 September 1862 at Sharpsburg. He most likely lost the rifle and it was recovered as a war trophy by a Union soldier, this may account for the condition of the gun. He would later be listed at a deserter.This is a great Confederate Enfield rifle, which saw action, but was not abused. Please read the historical file under the photos. $4500.00

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“T.S”

F266. CONFEDERATE 1853 ENFIELD RIFLE – BLOCK “T.S” MARKED - UNION CAPTURED & REISSUED: This is a Confederate 1853 Enfield Rifle with a rare block T.S mark forward of the butt plate tang, and an 1862 dated Tower lock. The butt plate is marked with an A over 45, which is for a Northern unit designation. The gun was either battlefield captured or taken off a Southern blockade runner ship, and reissued. There were several Northern State units issued captured Enfield’s; however, without a little more information I do not know which one got this rifle. On the underside forward of the trigger a soldier carved his initials C K.  A quick search of the civil war data-base found over 1000 Confederate and 6500 Union soldiers with these initials, making a match impossible. The gun in in great condition with expected wear; the barrel and retention bands have matching patina; the bore has strong rifling; the rear site works; the lock work in both half and full cock; and both sling swivels are present.  Here is a rarely seen T.S marked Confederate Enfield rifle, which was Union captured and reissued. $2300.00

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F267. H&P ALTERED U.S. MODEL 1822 SPRINGFIELD MUSKET: This H&P Civil War period conversion musket is .69 caliber with a 42" barrel retained by three flat barrel bands with springs. It is browned finish with a smooth walnut stock. It is marked with a {spread-winged eagle} over US forward of the hammer, and in three vertical lines: "SPRING / FIELD / 1830" at the tail of the lock: patent breech marked 1861 and H&P: a clear script "JT" cartouche and an A/2 reclassification cartouche, with a legible script "JS" final inspection cartouche behind the trigger guard. The gun retains the H&P added 1858 pattern leaf rear sight; the H&P added front sight blade on upper band, a socket bayonet lug, and a correctly modified button head ramrod dished for conical ammunition and sling swivels.  The New Jersey firm of Hewes & Phillips altered some 20,000 US Model 1816/22/18 and Model 1835/40 flintlock muskets to percussion during the American Civil War, roughly 8,000 "Type I" rifled and sighted alterations for the state of New Jersey and some 12,000 "Type II" for the US Ordnance Department, most of these being smooth bore. This is a classic "Type I," rifled with three lands and grooves with a clean out screw in the bolster with “NJ” New Jersey markings on the barrel. The gun is in Fine++ condition. Retains some brown finish mixed with an oxidized brown patina; markings in metal are crips and clear; markings in wood slightly worn, but strong. Mechanically functional with a very good bore with the last few inches nearest the muzzle dirty and somewhat pitted. The stock is crisp with sharp edges, showing scattered bumps, dings and mars, some minor hairline grain cracks are present as well, but appear non-structural. $1800.00

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F284. 6TH NEW YORK CAVALRY (SERIAL NUMBER RANGE) REMINGTON 1861 OLD MODEL REVOLVER ORIGINAL & UNALTERED: This is a Remington 1861 Old Model revolver in original & unaltered condition. The gun has a gray brown finish; property functions; retains original grip that have an inspection cartouche on each side, and a blade front site. Overall, this is a great example of a rare early Civil War Remington revolver. When this gun was produced, it was designed so a soldier could remove the cylinder without lowering the level; however, the designed was flawed and the US governments sent many back to be modified. This example was not modified and is a rare find. It is serial number 1974, which places it in the range (1939-2011) for the 6th New York Cavalry, a unit with a rich combat history. $1895.00

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F288.  P1856 2-BAND ENFIELD RIFLE: This is a Pattern 1856 2-Band Enfield rifle complete with all original swivels; both barrel-bands; rear site; ram-rod, 1861 dated lock, and nipple protector and chain. The lock properly functions, and the three-grove bore is string and bright. On the under of the stock below the trigger guard are to sets of viewer marks; W C and E.T.C. These marks are not associated with the Confederacy, and since there are no British military marks, this rifle most likely when north to the Union. The stock is solid and all the steel has matching attic patina. Overall, an outstanding example of a Civil War P1856 Enfield 2-Band rifle. $2500.00

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F292. CONFEDERATE CLEANED & REPAIRED “S” MARKED - AUSTRIAN M-1854 LORENZ RIFLE MUSKET: The Austrian M-1854 Lorenz Rifle Musket was a very popular rifle during the Civil War and many where imported by both the Union and Confederacy.  The design with the fixed blade site and the large cheek rest where more common to the South, and I believe this is a Confederate carried Lorenz rifle. The stock has its share of dings and dents and is complete; has the letter A carved in the stock, as well as the initials “F LS” on the flat side of the stock, and a letter “S” stamped to the real of the trigger tang. This “S” corresponds to other CS single-letter inspector’s stamps on reissued longarms, have gone through the "Cleaned, Repaired and Inspected" process. All the metal has an even brown patina, the lock is marked 858 (1858) and properly functions, both swivels and the ram-rod are original, but the nipple is replaced.  The bore retains sharp rifling. $2100.00

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98488

98828

F293. COLT 1851 NAVY REVOLVER; HARTFORD CT, 1860 – POSSIBLE SOUTH CAROLINA: This Hartford CT marked Colt 1851 Navy Revolver was made in 1860 and may possibly be associated with South Carolina. We know of two 1851 Navy revolvers lettered by Colt as being shipped to South Carolina: 98488 was one of a shipment of 50 guns sent to Gravely and Pringle in Charleston SC on January 15, 1861, and 98828 was one of a shipment of 60 guns sent to South Carolina on January 3, 1861. This gun is serial number 98433 and is well within the number range for the 110 guns sent to South Carolina. The revolver retains approximately 25% original cylinder scene; all original nipples; generous amounts of silver plating on the trigger guard and back strap; original grips with 40% original varnish; and properly functions. The serial number 98433 matches except for the wedge, which is unmarked. $2400.00

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F294. COLT 1860 ARMY REVOLVER, 1862 PRODUCTION – POSSIBLE 1st NEW YORK MOUNTED RIFLE REGIMENT: This is a Colt 1860 Army Revolver with serial number 63883 on all parts except the wedge 9796, and has 5 combat notched carved in the grip. The gun has a deep rich brown patina; a steel back strap, original nipples; strong rifling; tight grips with cartouche marks, and properly functions. A search of the colt data base shows the following revolvers where issued to the 1st New York Mounted Rifles in 1864: 63815, 63868 and 63891. The serial number 63883 falls within the range of those numbers and may possible have gone to the same unit. $2295.00

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F296. CONFEDERATE RICHMOND ALTERED M1836 PISTOL WITH ADAMS BOLSTER: With the coming of the Civil War, most southern states had limited quantities of weapons, and what they had was obsolete. Virginia had a large supply of older flintlock arms in various states of repair; most of which would be altered to percussion. This is one of those reworked pistols. It is a Confederate altered US Model 1836 Flintlock Pistol. The pistol shows all of the hallmarks of an Adams alteration with a classic “three-faceted” bolster with the circular shadow of the rod used to hold it in place while it was brazed to the barrel. $1395.00

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F297. CONFEDERATE RICHMOND ALTERED M1836 PISTOL WITH ADAMS BOLSTER: With the coming of the Civil War, most southern states had limited quantities of weapons, and what they had was obsolete. Virginia had a large supply of older flintlock arms in various states of repair; most of which would be altered to percussion. This is one of those reworked pistols. It is a Confederate altered US Model 1836 Flintlock Pistol. The pistol shows all of the hallmarks of an Adams alteration with a classic “three-faceted” bolster with the circular shadow of the rod used to hold it in place while it was brazed to the barrel, and assembly hash marks “XII” beside a brass inlay.  $1495.00

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"Z"

RARE– SMITH ARTILLERY CARBINE – CONFEDERATE CAPTURED & REISSUED

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F302. M1854 LEFAUCHEUX PIN-FIRE REVOLVERThe Lefaucheux Pin-Fire revolver was a new invention at the time of the Civil War. The primary importer was George Schuyler who purchased 10,000 revolvers for the US government. Other importers included Herman BokerSchuyler, Hartley & GrahamGeorge RaphaelAlexis Godillot of Paris and even Tiffany & Company. US cavalry units that received pinfire revolvers included the 5th IL, 2nd & 5th KS, 6th KY, 8th MO, 1st WI and the 9th MO State Militia Cavalry. The Springfield Research Service serial number books list the serial numbers for 69 Lefaucheux revolvers that were in the possession of Company B of the 9th Missouri State Militia Cavalry during 1863. These 69 revolvers range from serial number 33,895 through 42,522. This 9,000+ range of serial numbers within a single company of US cavalry makes it relatively easy to extrapolate that Lefaucheux revolvers within the 25,XXX through at least the 45,XXX range are within the realistic realm of US purchased revolvers that saw Civil War use. Confederate units under the command of General Nathan Bedford Forrest had at least a few hundred of these revolvers in their possession in late 1864. A May 25, 1864 Ordnance Report from Meridian, Mississippi by Forrest showed his 1st Division in possession of 190 French Pistols and his 3rd Division in possession of another 160. It is almost certain that these French Pistols were Lefaucheux revolvers. Additionally, in 1864 the Selma Arsenal was offering Lefaucheux revolvers for sale to Confederate officers.

This is not a Northern contracted purchased gun, and there is no positive way to identify it as Confederate carried. It is considered a private purchased revolver. The gun is complete with the original unloading rod; locking cylinder latch; retains all original screws; lanyard-ring; original grips; crisp rifling and properly functions. The Lefaucheux mark is on top of the 6 1/4-inch barrel and on the side where a number 26 is also stamped.  The serial number is LF 73416. The grips are complete with much original finish and the number 16353 stamped on the left grip. The gun has a pleasing deep brown patina.$850.00

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F307. CONFEDERATE ROLLER-BUCKLE BELT WITH COLT NAVY SLIM-JIM HOLSTER & HARTFORD COLT 1851 NAVY REVOLVER: This is a Confederate Roller-Buckle belt with a Colt Navy Slim-Jim holster, complete with a Hartford Colt 1851 Navy Revolver. The serial number 92654 matches on the lower & upper receiver, the loading lever, the trigger guard and the wedge; however, the back strap has a different number; 80716. Serial number 92654 dates to 1859 and 80716 to 1857. Many of the 90xxx Colt Navy Revolvers were purchased by Southern states prior to the outbreak of the Civil War. The Hartford make on the top of the barrel is well worn, but readable; the action is tight and holds in both half and full cock positions; the nipples, front site and all screws are original, and there is even some original silver on the trigger guard. The Confederate Roller-Buckle belt is in good shape with one repair as shown in the photos, and the Colt Navy Revolver Slim-Jim Holster has beautiful patina and the single loop with a very cool period repair on the reverse. The holster is soft at its top from wear, but displays well with the revolver and the belt. This price is for the revolver, belt and holster, and shipping is included. $2600.00

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F312. BALLARD CARBINE: Wartime Ballard Carbines were manufactured from 1862-1866 by Ball & Williams of Worcester Mass. The “Old Model” were .54 Caliber and the “Model 1864” where .44 Caliber. The US government had a same contract for this gun, but the bulk were used mainly by the Militia of Kentucky and since this gun has no US government cartouche, it is most likely a Kentucky carried gun. Its serial number is 1854. This gun shows heavy field use, but is complete. The forearm has some chips and crack along the barrel with a retention pin hole on the right side. The stock has a 4-inch split through the wrist and comb area with an open hole for a screw on the right side. There is a large “X\” scratching into the stock’s right side. It has a reverse mounted Rocky Mountain front sight with a German silver blade and a military 2 leaf rear sight. The top flat is Ball & Williams marked and the left side has Merwin & Bray agent marked, and the right side has the Ballard patent stamp. The barrel has a good amount of original blue finish with some salt and peppering. The breech block properly functions and the manual extractor works. The barrel band is tight and all swivels are original. This is not a high-end specimen but a good representative example of one that saw some action. It would like great in any Civil War carbine collection, cavalry or Kentucky display. $1500.00

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Click the above image to read the historical information.

F316. COLT MODEL 1851 NAVY REVOLVER, ID’ED - 4TH NEW HAMPSHIRE INFANTRY: Here we have a Colt Model 1851 Navy Revolver, matching serial number 138195 on all parts to include the wedge, cylinder and loading lever. Colt factory records identify the model as 1851 NAVY (.36 caliber with naval engagement on cylinder, octagonal barrel) and year of manufacture: 1863. The gun is fully operation and holds both in half & full cock positions, has all original screws, and original grips. It has an even dark-brown patina on all steel parts with a brown-muster patina on the brass trigger guard and back-strap. On the bottom of the back-strap engraved in old English is the name A. R. Hull.

    A.R. Hull.

A search of the Civil War Data Base found only one match for this name: Albert R. Hull, "D" Co. New Hampshire 4th Infantry. In the National Park Service records there is an Ohio soldier identified with the same name, but Civil War Data Base records list him as Albert R. Hall of the 73rd Regiment, Ohio Infantry and he was killed on 8/30/1862 at 2nd Bull Run, Virginia before this revolver was assembled, and could not have had this gun. Albert R. Hull mustered in 8/21/1862 and fought with his unit in South Carolina, Virginia and North Carolina; was promoted to Corporal; wounded at Deep Bottom Run, VA, and shortly after the battle for Fort Fisher contracted Typhoid and died on 3/17/1865 at Fort Monroe, VA. $3500.00

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"Z"

F322. CONFEDERATE CLEANED & REPAIRED “Z” MARKED - M1816 SPRINGFIELD MUSKET: The recently published book “CAPTURED & COLLECTED: CONFEDERATE REISSUED ARMS” by Cpt. Steve W. Knott, USN (ret.) is an outstanding reference source for the identification of rifles recovered from the battlefield and returned to Richmond to be repaired; refurbished; cleaned; and reissued.  Some of these guns have obvious repairs, and others where fully functional and just needed cleared; but in all cases, each gun was tested for functionality and then approved for re-issue by an inspector. This gun has a Belgium conversion; it is smooth bore; has an original ram-rod; an 1838 Springfield lock, and a barrel with the same date. The stock is in great condition with no breaks, and the carved initials “PB” and the faint carving of some other initials possibly “C C.” On the underside, forward of the trigger tang, is stamped the letter “Z”. The “Z” mark is associated with Captain Louis Zimmer, who was involved with Confederate cleaning and repair operations at Richmond. There is a second mark, but it is hard to discern. As a smooth-bore musket, this would have been an early battlefield recovered gun carried by a Union troop before being issue a 1861 Springfield rifle. $2900.00

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"Z"

F323. CONFEDERATE – “Z” MARKED CLEANED AND REPAIRED MODEL 1842 HARPERS FERRY RIFLE: The Model 1842 was the first regulation percussion musket to be manufactured at both Springfield and Harpers Ferry Armories, as well as the first to be produced by both national armories with fully-interchangeable parts. These were also the last .69 caliber smoothbore arms to be produced by the U.S. government. After Virginia voters passed an ordinance of secession in 1861, the town was occupied by Confederate soldiers and Confederates removed armory machinery, tools, rifles, and parts to Richmond, Virginia and Fayetteville, North Carolina. This M1842 rifle has a Harpers Ferry 1847 dated lock, which is crisp and holds in both half and full cock. The original barrel inspection marks are faint and only the number 1 from the date on the barrel tang is visible; most likely buffed off during the Clean & Repair process at Richmond. The smooth bore is original and is bright; all barrel bands are original and both sling swivels are present. The stock is in great shape with no breaks or cracks, but there is a little wood lose near the forward lock screw. On the underside, forward of the trigger tang, is stamped the letter “Z”.  The “Z” mark is associated with Captain Louis Zimmer, who was involved with Confederate cleaning and repair operations at Richmond. On one side of the real stock are two sets of initials “JJC” and “JKAF” and on the other side are 5 circles and the initial “CCC over the number 14. Forward is another circle and one with the number 2 opposite the lock.  I have searched my resources and have not been able to find a match for the “JJC” and “JKAF” initials, and as for the triple-C over the number 14, It is most likely a unit identifier and an issue number, but I can’t say for sure to whom. This is an outstanding Harpers Ferry Confederate carried musket. $3500.00

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Click the above Kansas state seal to read the historical file

F324. STARR CARBINE – KANSAS IDENTIFIED: In January 1858, Ebenezer Starr submitted his design for a single-shot, breech-loading rifle to the Washington Armory for evaluation. During testing, the rifle was noted to have no misfires, and its accuracy was considered better than average. Testers commented that if the gas seal could be improved, the weapon would be better than its rival, the Sharps carbine. The rifle was adopted as the Model 1858 carbine and was designed to fire paper or linen cartridges. During the war, the Starr Arms Company had been the fifth largest supplier of carbines, and between 1861 and 1864, over 20,000 were produced by the Starr Arms Company of Yonkers, New York. The Starr carbine was primarily used by cavalry soldiers in the American Civil War from the states of Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, New York, Colorado and Pennsylvania.  

This Starr carbine is in amazing condition with its blue barrel; traces of case coloring; double cartouche inspected stock; matching inspection marks; low serial number (8610); strong rifling and a Kansas identified soldiers name carved in the stock: G. Shove. A search of the Civil War Research database, as well as the National Park Service records, produced only one positive match for a cavalry soldier with the name G. Shove: George Shove from “L” Company, Kansas 11th Cavalry Regiment. George Shove enlisted on 2/29/1864 as a Corporal. On 2/29/1864 he mustered into "L" Co. KS 11th Cavalry and was Mustered Out on 9/26/1865. The 11th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry Regiment was a cavalry regiment that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War and had two post-war engagements against the Lakota Sioux and Cheyenne Indians. As you look at the photos, make sure to read the historical file which is included with the carbine. Identified carbines are rare to find, especially one for a Kansas Soldier. $3600.00

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F325. COLT MODEL 1851 NAVY REVOLVER #129647 S (1862): This is a Colt Model 1851 Navy Revolver, Serial number #129647 S, made 1862, and is a Civil War period revolver. The serial number matches except for the unmarked wedge. The grips are original and on right side is affixed a brass American Eagle. The gun has a brown patina and surface pitting in the barrel. The action is tight and holds in both half and full cocked positions; one nipple looks to be replaced, and the rifling is strong. $1895.00

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PLEASE CLICK ON THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE SEAL TO READ THE HISTORICAL FILE

F326. P1853 ENFIELD RIFLE - SERIAL NUMBER BUTT PLATE – NORTH CAROLINA IDENTIFIED: This Enfield Rifle is identified to William J. Colligue, 2nd North Carolina Infantry Regiment. The rifle has a serial numbered butt plate #9884 and the letter "J" above it ; is JS-Anchor marked; is marked on the trigger tang 45 F 2” and LSM” in different fonts; and has a soldier’s initials “Wm. C” carved in the stock.  The initials alone are not enough for an identification; however, the 45 F 2” on the trigger guard identifies the soldier the which this gun was issued: 45th soldier, F Company, 2nd Regiment. The Civil War data-base allows for a regimental look-up by the “Regimental Number” and a search of all units with the “2nd” designation was conducted (Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery). Both Confederate and Union units were researched to ensure a positive identification, and each unit roster was examined based on the soldier’s “in date” of enlistment to see if a “Wm. C” was the 45th soldier in Company F of any "2nd" designated unit.  After researching all units, one and only one soldier was identified as the 45th soldiers in Company F of a 2nd Regiment matching the initials “Wm C.”

William J. Colligue, 45th soldier, company F, 2nd North Carolina Regiment.

Colligue enlisted 27 May, 1861 in Company F, 2nd North Carolina Regiment and survived the war. He was captured at Petersburg where most assuredly his Enfield was taken.  This would account for the second set of initials: “LSM” for Louisiana State Militia. The Louisiana State Militia was a unit of freeman (black slaves) who were armed with Enfield Rifles: both Confederate captured and Union guns. This gun was assembled in Birmingham, England and normally would have a Tower lock dated 1861; however, it has a Barnett lock. It may be original, or replaced doing the war as it also appears the front site was period repaired. The lock-well shows age indicating it has been this way for a long time, and the serial numbers though worn, are readable. The gun is fully functional, had strong rifling, both sling swivels, and ram-rod. $6500.00

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F328. SAVAGE NAVY REVOLVER: The Savage “Navy” self-cocking revolver is possibly the most ungainly handguns of the Civil War. The .36 caliber, 6-shot revolver had a 7” octagonal barrel and an innovative ring-cocking action and a moving gas seal cylinder. The gun featured a unique ring-shaped cocking lever inside the heart shaped trigger guard, which was used to advance the cylinder and cock the hammer. The shooter could then fire the gun with the traditional trigger. The Savage Revolving Firearms Company secured its first official US military contract directly with the US government on October 16, 1861. This contract called for Savage to deliver 5,000 pistols between October 1861 and March 1862. Another contract was received from the government in November of 1861 to supply an additional 5,000 revolvers between November 1861 and May of 1862. Of the approximately 20,000 Savage “Navy” models produced during the Civil War, the US Ordnance Department took delivery of 11,384 of the guns, and the Navy took delivery of 1,126. The balance of approximately 8,500 guns were offered for civilian sale. This gun has a Government Cartouche on the left grip and is serial number #8163: second government contract. The gun is all original and has an even chocolate-brown patina; the cylinder properly functions with all original nipples; the front site is original with a notch carve into it, and the grips are original with faint matching serial number, also there are the initial P B carve in it. $2100.00

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F337. M-1858 Starr Army Revolver: This is a very nice example of a M-1858 Starr Army revolver. The design was innovative for its time and the self cocking mechanism was delicate and expensive, and lead to the Starr company dropping the model in preference to a cheaper and more robust single action design; the Model 1863. Although referred to as a “double action” revolver, the large trigger actually only cocked the hammer and rotated the cylinder, it did not fire the gun. Pulling the large trigger all the way to the rear pressed a very tiny recessed trigger that actually released the hammer to fire the gun. During the time it was produced, approximately 22,000 Starr M-1858 Army revolvers were produced, with about 16,100 going to fill US government contracts. The remaining production (about 6,000 or about 27%) were sold commercially to the public. This brown gun is one of those government contract models with all matching serial number #15427, and two excellent US military cartouches on the grips, as well as having unique art-work carved on both grip sides plus a five-point stars. $1600.00

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F331. CONFEDERATE IMPORTED GEORGIA “G” JS-ANCHOR SERIAL NUMBER ENFIELD: Confederate Enfield rifle are very scarce, and the rarest and most desirable are the ones purchased by individual southern states. The states of Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina and Louisiana all acquired arms directly from England and had state marks applied. The guns purchased by the state of Georgia are rarely encountered, but they are some of the best documented of the Confederate state purchased arms. In 1861, Major Edward C Anderson was sent to England to act as a Confederate central government purchasing agent of small arms and munitions, and as a Georgian, Governor Joseph E Brown relied upon him to work as a purchasing agent for Georgia. Anderson returned to the Confederacy aboard the Confederate Blockade Runner Fingal on October 8, 1861, and the Fingal brought the first 1,100 guns for Georgia; long Enfield’s with the engraved numbers 1-1100. The next shipment of Georgia purchased arms left England on the Blockade Runner Gladiator on November 6, 1861. The bill of lading for the Gladiator is in the archives of the Museum of the Confederacy, and it lists 900 “long” and 580 “short” Enfields. The long Enfields were numbers 1001-1120 (cases 51-56), 1221-1300 (cases 62-65), 1301-1960 (cases 78-110), 1961-1980 (case 123) and 1981-2000 (case129). These guns were all marked with the JS / (ANCHOR) inspection mark in the wood behind the trigger-guard tang and have engraved Confederate inventory numbers on the tang of the brass butt-plate. The guns are additionally marked with a 5/8” tall capital letter “G on the obverse buttstock.

This Enfield is one of those Gladiator guns and falls in the rang 1301-1960 (cases 78-110). It has a 5/8-inch “G” on the stock, serial number 1663 on the butt plate and JS-Anchor on the underside below the trigger tang. Opposite the lock, the soldier carved what looks like roman numerals and a 5-point star, and initials “M L S” above the middle mount. The assembly hash mark "//" is in the ram-rod channel; on the bottom of the barrel; on the stock forward of the butt plate; on the butt plate underside; the tang screw; and one of the lock screws; and the two lower barrel bands. These guns were shipped with an 1861 Tower lock, which the gun has, but I think it is a battle-field replacement because it has no assembly hash marks. Also, the gun  has strong rifling, an unnumbered ram-rods, and is missing the top band and sling swivels. This is a very rare enfield. $7500.00

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F334. SMITH & WESSON #2 OLD ARMY REVOLVER: The Smith & Wesson No 2 Old Army revolver was a six shot, .32 caliber single action revolver that fired a .32 caliber rimfire cartridge. The revolver was introduced in 1861 and remained in production until 1874. During that time some 77,155 of the revolvers were manufactured. Those pistols under serial number 35,731 were produced prior to May 1, 1865 and are considered Civil War use. The gun was very popular for soldiers and officers on both sides during the conflict.  From the stand point of size, the Smith & Wesson No 2 was probably one of the most practical pistols to carry in the field. It was lighter and easier to deal with than a Colt Navy or Colt Army percussion revolver.

This Smith & Wesson No 2 is serial number 8182, which puts it early in the American Civil War. The serial number is very clearly stamped in the bottom of the grip frame and is also stamped inside of the right grip panel. The gun is mechanically excellent with a crisp action and a very tight lock up, and times and indexes exactly as it should. Typically, these “tip up” revolvers are found with excessive play in the hinge between the barrel and frame and they tend to wiggle. This one is nice and tight. The top of the barrel rib is clearly marked: Smith & Wesson Springfield. MASS, and the cylinder is marked: PATENTED APRIL 3, 1855. JULY 5, 1859 & DEC. 18, 1860. Traces of original blue finish is visible under the brown patina. $1300.00

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F335. SMITH & WESSON #2 OLD ARMY REVOLVER: The Smith & Wesson No 2 Old Army revolver was a six shot, .32 caliber single action revolver that fired a .32 caliber rimfire cartridge. The revolver was introduced in 1861 and remained in production until 1874. During that time some 77,155 of the revolvers were manufactured. Those pistols under serial number 35,731 were produced prior to May 1, 1865 and are considered Civil War use. The gun was very popular for soldiers and officers on both sides during the conflict.  From the standpoint of size, the Smith & Wesson No 2 was probably one of the most practical pistols to carry in the field. It was lighter and easier to deal with than a Colt Navy or Colt Army percussion revolver.

This Smith & Wesson No 2 is serial number 31534, which places its later in the American Civil War. The serial number is very clearly stamped in the bottom of the grip frame and is also stamped inside of the right grip panel. The gun is mechanically excellent with a crisp action and a very tight lock up, and times and indexes exactly as it should. Typically, these “tip up” revolvers are found with excessive play in the hinge between the barrel and frame and they tend to wiggle. This one is nice and tight. The top of the barrel rib is clearly marked: Smith & Wesson Springfield. MASS, and the cylinder is marked: PATENTED APRIL 3, 1855. JULY 5, 1859 & DEC. 18, 1860. There is a good amount of original blue finish with a beginning brown patina. $1400.00

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F330. M1854 LEFAUCHEUX PIN-FIRE REVOLVER - KANSASThe Lefaucheux Pin-Fire revolver was a new invention at the time of the Civil War. The primary importer was George Schuyler who purchased 10,000 revolvers for the US government. Other importers included Herman BokerSchuyler, Hartley & GrahamGeorge RaphaelAlexis Godillot of Paris and even Tiffany & Company. US cavalry units that received pinfire revolvers included the 5th IL, 2nd & 5th KS, 6th KY, 8th MO, 1st WI and the 9th MO State Militia Cavalry. The Springfield Research Service serial number books list the serial numbers for 69 Lefaucheux revolvers that were in the possession of Company B of the 9th Missouri State Militia Cavalry during 1863. These 69 revolvers range from serial number 33,895 through 42,522. This 9,000+ range of serial numbers within a single company of US cavalry makes it relatively easy to extrapolate that Lefaucheux revolvers within the 25,XXX through at least the 45,XXX range are within the realistic realm of US purchased revolvers that saw Civil War use. Additionally, Company D of the 2nd Kansas Cavalry had several issued guns between the number range 20203 - 34952. Confederate units under the command of General Nathan Bedford Forrest had at least a few hundred of these revolvers in their possession in late 1864. A May 25, 1864 Ordnance Report from Meridian, Mississippi by Forrest showed his 1st Division in possession of 190 French Pistols and his 3rd Division in possession of another 160. It is almost certain that these French Pistols were Lefaucheux revolvers. Additionally, in 1864 the Selma Arsenal was offering Lefaucheux revolvers for sale to Confederate officers.

The serial number for this revolver is 34388, which is within the 25,XXX through 45,XXX range of the US purchased guns, and it is highly probable the gun was carried by a 2nd Kansas Calvary soldier. The gun is complete with the original unloading rod; locking cylinder latch; retains all original screws; lanyard-ring; original grips; crisp rifling and properly functions. The Lefaucheux mark is on top of the 6 1/4-inch barrel and on the side. The serial number is LF 34388 is deeply stamped. The grips are complete with much original finish, and the cylinder and functioning load door retain much of the original blue finish. US Government purchased Lefaucheux are hard to find! $1600.00

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