ARIZONA - SWORDS 

    Confederate

    Edge Weapons

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    ACRYLIC SWORD & SCABBARD STAND: This pair of acrylic sword & scabbard stands was designed to hold one sword and its scabbard. Each is 5 inches tall and designed with square edge groves to prevent the sword or scabbard from flipping over as often happens with similar stands with a rounded cut. They will accommodate swords of all sized from small bowie knives to cavalry sabers.  This design presents a very clean and crisp display that is attractive. $27.00

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    C162.  CONFEDERATE SHORT ARTILLERY:  This Confederate short artillery sword is a great example of Southern ingenuity. It basically is a copy of the Ames short artillery sword.  The hilt is a one piece sand-cast Confederate copy of the Ames sword hilt.  It does not have the rivets found on an Ames hilt, but has dimples in the grip, and the eagles on the pommel lack the well-defined details found on an Ames version. You can also see the sand-casting flaw in the cross guard.  The blade is totally void of any maker or retailer marks, but appears to match those made by Ames.  The scabbard leather body conforms to the Ames design, but the brass mounts are 100% Confederate made.  The shape and pin method of attachment are a Southern trait, and the brass frog-stud is larger in size then those on a Union sword.  The frog is a Confederate British import and properly fits keeping the blade 1/2 inch above the scabbard mount. The patina on the sword and scabbard mounts match.  Here is a great complete example of a Confederate Short Artillery sword! $2000.00

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    C228.  CONFEDERATE FOOT OFFICERS SWORD: This Confederate Foot Officer sword is the second know example of this design I have seen to date. The other surfaced in 2009 in Virginia and is in a private collection. They are basically identical with the exception of the blade. The 2009 sword had a CS etched blade, and this one is unetched. The hilt is exceptionally well made with an unusual circle/dot quillon; a different guard branch design at the pommel; high quality grip, and triple strand wire. The scabbard copies a Sauerbier style, but the quality is not quite there. The mount designs are different and crude, and the lap-seam is lead and brass finished. These are common traits of a Southern made sword. The un-etched blade has a pen-knife single fuller designed found on other well-known Confederate Foot officer’s sword.  In the photos section, I included more information and photos of this sword, the 2009 sword and a third sword with the same pen-knife single fuller designed blade. Recently, a Confederate Staff & Field sword by J. Luther of Cincinnati, Ohio was discovered. It has several similar features as found on this sword: the pommel cap, the guard branch where it connects to the pommel cap, and the unique quillon with the bull’s-eye design. There have been a few other marked and unmarked Confederate swords attributed to J. Luther; however, to date there are no known Union examples.  Cincinnati is so close to the Kentucky boarder there is no doubt there were southern sympathizers, and Southern Officers from that state purchased sword from Luther.

    Question? Did Luther move south to make swords or did he sell sword parts to a Southern maker who then made the swords. Since there are less then 10 know examples of swords credited to Luther, and no known example of US carried officer swords attributed to him, it is more likely a Southern sword maker to the south of Ohio purchased blades from Luther and made the sword. $2900.00

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    C233.  LEECH & RIGDON SHORT ARTILLERY SWORD:  This original Civil War Period Confederate Short Artillery Sword has been attributed to Leech & Rigdon. The brass handle is tight with great sand casting flaws. It is in untouched condition with a small piece of the original leather washer remaining. The blade has a dark gray patina with a few knicks. $1600.00

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    C284. MITCHELL & TYLER (BOYLE & GAMBLE) CONFEDERATE FOOT OFFICER SWORD: Boyle & Gamble of Richmond, Virginia was the Confederacy’s most prolific maker of officer’s swords and the company’s field and staff officer’s sword is easily the most recognized sword produced during the Confederate era.  The firm made swords for retail sale as well as government contracts.  The company also supplied their high quality officer’s swords for resale to jewelry and military outfitter, Mitchell & Tyler, located on Main Street in Richmond, Virginia.  Mitchell & Tyler did no manufacturing, but sold the very finest swords, belts, buttons, and even laces and silverware.  In short, they sold everything and more, necessary for the dapper Confederate Officer.  The sword shown here is an example of the sword Boyle and Gamble made for Mitchell and Tyler. It is a standard Foot Officer sword with its original scabbard. The hilt and pommel cap have a deep reddish-brown patina, and displays great casting flaws. The original leather blade washer keeps the un-etched blade tight. The scabbard is original is strong and retains all original mounts, which have the original retention pins. This is a great example of a Confederate Foot Officers sword made by Boyle & Gamble for retail by Mitchell & Tyler. $5595.00

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    C287. ISAAC & Co. CONFEDERATE SABER: This is an Isaac & Co. Model 1853 cavalry saber, which the Confederate government purchased in England during the War Between the States. When you look at these sabers, always look to see it the Isaac & Co. mark is on the spine of the blade near the guard. This saber has that marks. The hilt has a nice patina and is tight, and the pressed leather grip show wear, but is very nice. The blade has a nice even patina and is fairly bright with no nicks or rust. The scabbard has an even brown patina with several dings and dents’, indicating it was carried. The scabbard did its job of protecting the blade. The last one I sold went for $4000.00; however, this is available for less. $3100.00

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    C300. DOG-RIVER CONFEDERATE ARTILLERY SABER: This Dog-River Confederate Enlisted Light Artillery Saber is extremely rare, and to date, I have only seen two examples and the other did not have a scabbard. The unique pommel cap and single-branch guard both have great casting flaws and file marks. The grip is shark skin, which is extremely rare. There is a small strand of double twisted wire under the pommel cap. The curved blade is wavy with an unstopped fuller. The scabbard is well made and high quality for being Confederate, and the lapped seam is barely visible. The metal body has original period paint with brass mounts and brass rings. The reverse side of the scabbard has a buff finish to the black and the brass has a copper-brown patina, whereas the front has a slight sheen to the black and the brass is mustard colored. This may have been a result of the front being dusted while hanging in a GAR HALL.  If you collect Confederate swords, especially Artillery sabers, this is a must! $5995.00

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    C307. BRITISH PATTERN 1853 ENFIELD DRAGOON SABER- MINT CONDITION: This is a very nice example of the British Pattern 1853 Enlisted Dragoon Saber, often referred to as an Enfield Cavalry Saber. This saber was the standard one used by British Enlisted cavalrymen and dragoons. Thousands were imported into the Confederacy during the American Civil War. The Confederate Government purchased some; Confederate States purchased some; and some were purchased by arms dealers and blockade runners. The most desirable of the Pattern 1853 Sabers are the ones with the mark by the English supplier to the Confederacy, S Isaac & Campbell. These sabers are simply stamped ISAAC & CO on the spine of the blade. The only marking that is more desirable is the Georgia G mark on the ricasso of the sword, as well as on the scabbard. The British utilized this pattern of saber until well after the Civil War era, and post-Civil War P-1853 sabers are often encountered on the market. While the pattern of the saber is unchanged, the post-war scabbards have shorter, rounder mounts for the hanger suspension rings, while the war time scabbards have taller, more pointed mounts for the rings. The sabers used by the British Military and their various colonial forces are typically well marked with acceptance marks and often unit marked as well. The sabers produced for export to the Confederacy were mostly unmarked (with the exceptions noted above), and never bear British military marks. Some of the sabers do bear a maker mark on the spine of the blade, like Robert Mole of Birmingham, but marked sabers are the exception, not the rule for Civil War imports. According the records maintained by Captain John M Payne of the CS Ordnance Bureau, between July 17, 1863 and January 12, 1865, 34 cases of cavalry swords/sabers were imported into the port of Wilmington, NC. This is just a small snapshot of import sabers that entered the Confederacy through a single port during 18 months of fighting, at a time when fewer and fewer blockade runners were making it to Confederate ports without being captured.

    The British Pattern 1853 Enlisted Dragoon Saber offered here is in about NEAR MINT+ overall condition. The saber is full length and retains its original scabbard. The blade retains about 100% of its original polish. The saber is entirely unmarked and is a classic example of the most often encountered variant of these potentially Confederate used sabers. This saber was discovered in Texas and most likely arrived at Galveston carried by blockade runners. The throat washer at the blade/guard juncture is compete and mint; the iron guard and mounts show a thick brown patina over all of their surfaces; and the pressed leather grip panels are in MINT. These leather grips are typically encountered in much rougher condition. The scabbard is in NEAR-MINT++ condition overall and is complete. It is the correct, Civil War era pattern, with the tall, pointed suspension ring mounts. The original throat is in place as well. The sheet iron scabbard shows an even, smooth brown patina over the entire scabbard. Overall this is one of the beat British Pattern 1853 Enlisted Dragoon Saber I have seen in a while!  $1200.00

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    C310: BRITISH PATTERN 1853 ENFIELD DRAGOON SABER: This is a very nice example of the British Pattern 1853 Enlisted Dragoon Saber, often referred to as an Enfield Cavalry Saber. This saber was the standard one used by British Enlisted cavalrymen and dragoons. Thousands were imported into the Confederacy during the American Civil War. The Confederate Government purchased some; Confederate States purchased some; and some were purchased by arms dealers and blockade runners. The most desirable of the Pattern 1853 Sabers are the ones with the mark by the English supplier to the Confederacy, S Isaac & Campbell. These sabers are simply stamped ISAAC & CO on the spine of the blade. The only marking that is more desirable is the Georgia G mark on the ricasso of the sword, as well as on the scabbard. The British utilized this pattern of saber until well after the Civil War era, and post-Civil War P-1853 sabers are often encountered on the market. While the pattern of the saber is unchanged, the post-war scabbards have shorter, rounder mounts for the hanger suspension rings, while the war time scabbards have taller, more pointed mounts for the rings. The sabers used by the British Military and their various colonial forces are typically well marked with acceptance marks and often unit marked as well. The sabers produced for export to the Confederacy were mostly unmarked (with the exceptions noted above), and never bear British military marks. Some of the sabers do bear a maker mark on the spine of the blade, like Robert Mole of Birmingham, but marked sabers are the exception, not the rule for Civil War imports. According the records maintained by Captain John M Payne of the CS Ordnance Bureau, between July 17, 1863 and January 12, 1865, 34 cases of cavalry swords/sabers were imported into the port of Wilmington, NC. This is just a small snapshot of import sabers that entered the Confederacy through a single port during 18 months of fighting, at a time when fewer and fewer blockade runners were making it to Confederate ports without being captured.

    The British Pattern 1853 Enlisted Dragoon Saber offered here is in about NEAR EXTRA-FINE+ overall condition. The saber is full length and retains its original scabbard. The blade retains about 95%+ of its original polish, and shows only small scattered patches of minor age discoloration. The saber is entirely unmarked, and is a classic example of the most often encountered variant of these potentially Confederate used sabers. The throat washer at the blade/guard juncture is missing; the iron guard and mounts show a thick brown patina over all of their surfaces; and the pressed leather grip panels are in NEAR-MINT condition and show minimal shrinkage and only light wear. These leather grips are typically encountered in much rougher condition. The scabbard is in VERY GOOD++ condition overall and is complete. It is the correct, Civil War era pattern, with the tall, pointed suspension ring mounts. The original throat is in place as well. The sheet iron scabbard shows an even, smooth brown patina over the entire scabbard with one barely noticeable ding.

    Overall this is way above the condition example of the British Pattern 1853 Enlisted Dragoon Saber than is normally encountered. These sabers have been getting scarcer on the market over the past few years. $950.00

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    LEECH & RIGDON SHORT ARTILLERY SWORD

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    BOWIES & D-GUARDS

    Click the above photo to see video

    Before you purchase a Confederate Bowie watch this Youtube video of real knives.

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    C259. CONFEDERATE BOWIE - SIDE KNIFE: This Confederate Bowie Side-knife was discovered in Louisiana. From end to end the knife is 18 inches with a 11 1/4 inch spear point blade. The blade has never been cleaned and has great untouched patina. The original leather blade washer is complete and keeps the knife tight, and the solid wooded grip looks to be from a tool such as a file. The scabbard is leather covered wood with tin for the throat, drag and sides. You can see some leather lose, which exposes the wood, and you will notice the patina is perfict as well. Also, there is a Confederate flat button attached to the throat for use with a frog device. The scabbard design was influenced by a designed common to French short swords, and since the knife was discovered in Louisiana, the French influence would be strong. Also, the throat and drag are held in place with period staples. The cross-guard is made of pewter and has a hair-line crack, but is strong. This is a rare find! $3200.00

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    C286. D-GUARD BOWIE KNIFE: This D-Guard Bowie recently was discovered and is fresh to the market. It is 18 inches long with a 14 1/4 inch blade. The blade is very thin with a pronounced clip point; has filing marks, a few small nicks, and was period sharpened. The oak wood grip appears to be a tool handle with a steel ferrule, and the guard is thin brass. Looking at the area when the brass is penned to the wood, it is obvious the guard is original to the knife.  The brass also has traces of a black lacquered finish, not paint.  This is the first knife of this style I have seen. $900.00

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    C302. CONFEDERATE TRIPLE D-GUARD BOWIE: This is a rare example of a Confederate Triple D-Guard bowie knife. It is 24 inches long with a 19 inch clip-point blade. The edge and the tip of the blade are sharp with great even patina. The grip is made of two pieces of dark walnut with two steel pins and a brass ferrule. On the left side of the grip near the back are three hash marks (I I I), and there is some wood lose below those marks. The guard has three branches coming together at the base of the grip where pinned. What a rare knife! $6500.00

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    C303. CONFEDERATE D-GUARD BOWIE KNIFE: This Confederate D-Guard Bowie knife is fresh to the market, and was acquired from one of the most respected authorities on Confederate artifacts in the state of Virginia. The knife is 16 inches long with a 12 inch clip-point blade and displays great casting flaws and file marks. The D-Guard appears to be from an early sword and has a three pin wood slab grip. A small portion of the wood is missing making it possible to see that the blade was not a sword blade. What makes this exceptionally special is the original brown pig-skin sheath. It is in outstanding condition and is form fitted to the blade. The guard has a slight forward tilt and the leather matched it. $2900.00

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    C304. CONFEDERATE D-GUARD BOWIE: This Confederate D-Guard Bowie knife is amazing with its huge clip-point blade and the backward swept guard. This design similar, but not exact, to a D-Guard from Clear Point Alabama. This knife has a Walnut grip pinned with a leather washer forward, and a 17 3/4 inch by 2-inch-wide blade with a 6 1/2-inch clip-point. Overall length is just over 22 inches. The blade has great casting flaw, and several large chips of missing metal due to poor forging. Simply WOW! $2600.00

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    C308.  CONFEDERATE FIGHTING KNIFEThis is a newly discovered Confederate fighting knife. It is in amazing condition. Over 22 1/2 inches long with a blade over 16 1/4 inches. The blade has great casting flaws. The pistol grip handle is pinned with three large pins, and the end has a brass cap the flat head steel screws.  A known and respected dealer in Southern collectables had one word to say; "WOW." Another dealer recognized the grip as being made from a plow handle. I have attached a photo of an antique plow. The shape of the bowie’s grip matched that of the plow handle. Though the knife is large it is light and well balanced. $2600.00

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