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U694. HIGH-GRADE, PRESENTATION QUALITY DAMASCUS BLADE STAFF & FIELD SWORD: This is an amazing high-grade, presentation quality Damascus blade Staff & Field Officer sword original retailed by Bailey & Company of Philadelphia. Bailey, Banks & Biddle (BB&B) was a renowned upscale jewelry firm that made and sold high quality merchandise and during the period of the Civil War, Bailey & Co. produced extremely high-quality ornate swords for Union officers. This sword is of European origin, Solingen to be exact. At the ricasso of the blade you can see the Solingen mark under the gold wash directly below the Bailey & Co. retailer mark. The hilt, back-strap and pommel cap all retain 100% original gold wash. The face of the guard is adorned with oak leaves and egg corns, and leave vines continue on the back-strap up to an American eagle on the pommel cap. This grip is either Silver or German silver and is very solid with 100% triple-strand wire. The original red felt blade washer keeps the gold-washed 33 inch pipe-back Damascus blade tight, and you can see the Damascus steel from the tip to hilt with a unique 12-inch false edge. 100% of the original gold-wash is present where applied, and where not, the etching is mirror-like and frosty.  Also, an American eagle is in the center of the etched area holding an E Pluribus Unum banner. The scabbard is complete with ornate mounts to include an eagle, shield, cannon and US marked throat piece; Lady Liberty on the top mount; winged eagle and shield on the middle mount; and a marching soldier with a drawn sword and US flag on the drag. The body of the scabbard is dent-free and retains 100% original brown finish, and has the original wood inner liners. The only blemish is some period sharpening on the blade, which indicates it was carried during the war.  Simply WOW! $12,000 REDUCED $9,750.00

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F206. CONFEDERATESINCLAIR, HAMILTON & CO. MARKED 1853 3-BAND ENFIELD RIFLE: During the Civil War a large proportionate of 1853 Enfield Rifle Muskets were supplied by the Sinclair, Hamilton & Company, and they may have received as many as five contracts from the Confederacy. Sinclair, Hamilton & Company acquired their arms through five furnishers: EP BondJames KerrParker, Field & CoCW James and Scott & Son. The furnishers often marked their guns with a large single letter on the upper comb of the stock: B for Bond, a K for Kerr, and F for Parker, Field & Co, a J for James and an S for Scott & Son. These guns are found to have a Control Number on the butt plate, ram-rod, and the matching bayonet. Often the ram-rod and bayonet are no longer with the gun, or the numbers do not match due to the fact that these were interchangeable items. Also, these early muskets are normally JS marked.

Later version of Sinclair, Hamilton & Company provided Rifle Muskets are found with the following marks and were acquired from many additional suppliers:

This Confederate 1853 3-band Enfield rifle is marked with the Oval SHC, which is believed to be the last of several marks use by Sinclair, Hamilton & Co. as they filled their final contract for these rifles by the Confederate government.  As such, there are not as many Oval SHC rifle, available, and this is only the third I have found. If was discovered in Mississippi and most likely was carried by a soldier from that state. This rifle is all original with great un-touched brown patina on all steel parts, and a dark stock and matching parts, as well as matching assembly numbers. The stock is maker marked JOHN  MARSON and XX III (23) in the ram-rob channel. The barrel is maker marked SMITH and the number 23 twice. The lock is maker marked SMITH and the number 23, and both lock retention screws are marked XX III (23). Also, all three barrel bands are numbered 23, and the only part with a different number is the barrel retention screw with the mark X\ //.   

The Oval SHC mark is by the butt plate tang, and on the flat area opposite the lock, and between the top barrel band and the brass nose cap there is the outline of a large oval, but the SHC is worn since the is where a soldier held the top of the rifle.  This third mark is extremely rare and only this first time I have found this marking. The rifle still retains the original rear sight, which still works, and there remains good rifling in the bore, though it is dark and can use a good cleaning. $3600.00 REDUCED $3100.00

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NVBL01. CIVIL WAR NAVAL OFFICER BELT & BUCKLEThis is a Civil War period Naval Officer belt & buckle. The belt is brown leather complete with both parts of the two piece buckle, a leather belt-loop with a brass keeper and partial hanging strap.  The leather is supple condition. The two-piece buckle is the 1860 pattern plate and a match set with the number 95 on each piece. Both the tongue disk and wreath have matching patina. $900.00 REDUCED $725.00

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SLV01. ORIGINAL CSA CONFEDERATE CIVIL WAR CAVALRY CARBINE SLING SWIVEL SNAP HOOK BY COULSON: Here are two Confederate Cavalry sling swivel snap hooks, both British made by Jukes Coulson & Co. for export to the CSA during the War. Both are all original with the Coulson name on the hand forged link between swivel and snap hook with original patina as found. Each still has a good deal of tension on the spring. There are very rare and excellent conditions. $650.00 REDUCED $300.00 as a pair.

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SB01. INDIAN WARS COLONEL’S SHOULDER BOARDS – STATE of MARYLAND: Indian War period Colonel’s staff shoulder paddles with bullion eagles and Maryland state buttons, and dark back ground representing a staff officer. No makers mark. $775.00 REDUCED $650.00

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C220. CONFEDERATE IMPORTED P-1859 CUTLASS BAYONET, NUMBER 213: This is an extremely scarce example of a Confederate imported British P-1859 Naval Rifle Cutlass Bayonet, for use on the Pattern 1858 “Enfield” Naval Rifle. These rifles had thicker barrels than the standard Pattern 1856 rifle and were rifled with 5 grooves instead of the normal 3 grooves. The British military wanted to create a dual-purpose bayonet for the rifle (much like Admiral Dahlgren did with his Bowie Knife/Bayonet for the US M-1861 Naval Rifle), and settled on a combination naval cutlass & bayonet as the most practical design.

Just under 10,000 Enfield “Short Rifles” of all patterns were purchased by theConfederacy in 1861 and early 1862. These guns were marked with the JS-Anchormark and had engraved inventory numbers on the butt plates of the brass mounted guns and stamped numbers in the belly of the stock of the iron mounted guns. During the summer of 1861, Commander James D Bulloch of the Confederate Navy placed a separate order for 1,000 Pattern 1858 Naval Rifles, complete with Cutlass Bayonets. These short rifles with their cutlass bayonets were noted to have arrived in the Confederate port city of Savannah, GA on November 14, 1861, aboard the blockade runner Fingal (some sources note the arrival as 17th, but Bullock himself notes the 14th). Researchers believe that these Confederate purchased Naval Rifles and their accompanying bayonets were numbered in their own series from 1-1000. To date a total of 19 examples of Confederate marked and numbered P-1858 Naval Rifles are known, along with a total of around 35 Confederate numbered cutlass bayonets. The highest known number for either the rifles or bayonets is 999, which is found on a cutlass bayonet. This provides relatively concrete proof that only 1,000 of the numbered naval rifles and bayonets were purchased and imported into the Confederacy, making them incredibly scarce today. All known examples of the Confederate purchased cutlass bayonets have blades that are either unmarked, or marked with Solingen maker names or logos.

This Naval Cutlass Bayonet is in GOOD+ condition. All of the metal surfaces have a rich brown patina. The blade also has a deep brown patina with surface oxidation towards the last 8 inches of the blade, but no nicks to the cutting edge. The blade is unmarked. The metal basket guard shows no dents or dings with little wear to the pressed leather grip, but some shrinkage. The left pommel cap of the bayonet is clearly engraved with the Confederate inventory number 213. The original locking latch, spring and stud are present on the pommel cap of the bayonet and still function correctly.

Over all this is a good+, solid example of one of the scarcest of all Confederateimported British bayonets. The bayonet is 100% complete, correct and original.It is one of only 35+ Confederate numbered P-1859 Cutlass Bayonets known to have survived the 150 years since their original arrival in the Confederacy. While CS imported and numbered bayonets do appear for sale on the market from time to time, these cutlass bayonets are a true rarity. While this is hardly a minty example, it is a wonderful original Confederate cutlass. It is a must have for any Confederate naval collector, any collector of CS edged weapons, or any collector of CS purchased, inventory numbered rifles and muskets. $1995.00 REDUCED $1700.00

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C233.  CONFEDERATE SHORT ARTILLERY SWORD:  This is a scarce pattern Confederate Short Artillery Sword with picture perfect Southern sand casting and no shortage of casting flaws.  It is in untouched condition with a small piece of the original leather washer remaining. This is the same pattern as the example with the "C" & "S" in the ends of the cross guard.  A solid example with all the Confederate traits we love to see and ready for display. $1800.00 REDUCED $1600.00

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C251. COLUMBUS, GEORGIA NAVAL IRON WORKS D-GUARD CUTLASS: The D-Guard knife shown here was made at the Columbus, Georgia Naval Iron Works.  There are several known variations of knives/swords that were made at the Naval Iron Works.  The most common and well known of these is a cutlass that utilizes the identical blade and wooden grip pattern as that shown here, but with an “S” shaped cross guard made of either brass or iron.  This is the first however, that uses the identical grip and blade as the more common cutlass, in conjunction with a D style guard. The cutlass was originally intended for use by naval boarding parties.  The idea being that when two ships engaged in close quarters combat, the attacking party would leap from their own ship onto the enemy ship.  The cutlass would then be used in hand to hand combat, but more importantly they could hack through the enemy ships rigging, thereby disabling the ship. By the time of the War Between the States, rifled cannons made boarding parties obsolete just as the rifled musket had made smoothbore musket tactics obsolete.  Even though they had become obsolete, cutlasses were standard equipment on Confederate ships. This cutlass/D-guard measures twenty-four inches from pommel to point.  There is some loose play in the guard and there is a crack in the wooden grip, the blade remains smooth and semi bright.  There is no doubt that this cutlass remains in its original configuration; it has not been cleaned, repaired or altered in any way. $3800.00 REDUCED $3200.00

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C261. CONFEDERATE NAVAL CUTLASS.  This is a near-mint Confederate Civil War Naval Cutlass. The cutlass style is a copy of the model 1841 cutlass, but with a crude eagle in the pommel cap, no rivets, and great sand casting flaws. The blade is 21 inches long and narrow at the base. I have seen these with a variety of different leather scabbards, but the one for this is missing at sea. The cutlass is in near-mint condition with a bright original blade, a hilt with nearly 100% original finish, and outstanding sand-casting stippling on the guard. The guard, which is originally rounded, shows use and is dented flat, this is very common. It will be hard to find a better condition example of the Confederate Naval Cutlass. $1500.00 REDUCED $1000.00

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C256. MASSIVE CONFEDERATE BOWIE FIGHTING KNIFEThis Confederate knife with original russet scabbard is well made and heavily constructed.  It is 21.5 inches long, 1 3/4 inches at its widest point, and weighs 1 pounds 14 oz. The knife would normally be in the blacksmith made category, but the quality is very good and there are several known examples which are almost identical. There is a published example with DEATH TO ABOLITION carved in the blade. There is another with a D-guard configuration, one with a partial S-Guard design, and another 2 identical to this; making five known examples. All five have the same grip and blade design, and russet scabbard. This scabbard would have had a reinforced band and heavy belt loop, but that is gone on this example; however, the leather remains very strong with original stitching, and "J A C" carved near the top. The spin of the blade has been cleaned, and the knife shows evidence of being sharpened at some time since the Civil War. If you need to see photos of other examples, please e-mail and I will direct you to the web-site with that information. $1800.00 REDUCED $1500.00

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C259. CONFEDERATE BOWIE - SIDE KNIFE: This Confederate Bowie Side-knife was recently discovered in Louisiana, and is an amazing find. From end to end the knife is 18 inches with a 11 1/4 inch spear point blade. The blade has never been cleaned and has great untouched patina. The original leather blade washer is complete and keeps the knife tight, and the solid wooded grip looks to be from a tool such as a file. The scabbard is a piece of art. It is leather covered wood with tin for the throat, drag and sides. You can see some leather lose, which exposes the wood, and you will notice the patina is perfict as well. Also, there is a flat button attached to the throat for use with a frog device. The scabbard design was influenced by a designed common to French short sword, and since the knife was discovered in Louisiana, the French influence would be strong. Also, the throat and drag are held in place with period staples. The cross-guard is made of pewter and has a hair-line crack, but is strong. This is a rare find! $4500.00 REDUCED $3500.00

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C263. CONFEDERATE BOWIE SIDE-KNIFE: This is an amazing example of a Confederate Bowie Side-knife complete with its original scabbard. The knife was discovered in Virginia. It overall length is 18 1/2 inches with a 13 3/4 by 2 1/4 inch clip point blade, brass guard and slabbed wood grip. It is a well-made knife. The blade shows great casting flaws and period sharpening with to two nicks in the center area. The scabbard is also well-made with original cotton thread stitching, a brass throat riveted to the leather, and a large belt loop. The rivets are similar to those found on naval cutlasses.  This is a newly discovered knife and fresh to the market. $5500.00 REDUCED $3500.00

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U615. SAUERBIER TYPE-3 CAVALRY OFFICER SABER, 1ST VARIATION: This Sauerbier Type-3 Cavalry Officer Saber, 1st Variation is a great example of the quality work Sauerbier produced. The large guard is designed with multiple branches that split into 5 sections. The grip is 100% original black leather with triple-strand wire. The original scallop-cut blade washer holds the 32 1/2 inch blade tight. The blade is free of pitting or rust, but has some dark areas with period sharpening and some very small service nicks. The etching is strong with the Sauerbier maker mark and a large blocked U. S. The scabbard is brown metal to include the flame style throat, large chased ring mounts, and a heavy fancy drag unique to this maker. Sauerbier swords are simple a work of art, and a must for any Civil War edge weapon collector. $3100.00 REDUCED $2500.00

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U620. AMERICAN ETCHED (WAR OF 1812): - ENGLISH P-1796 LIGHT CAVALRY OFFICERS' SABER: In 1796 the British War Department adopted a newly designed saber for use by the Light Cavalry based upon John Gaspard Le Merchant military experiences in the field. Le Merchant saw the inadequacies in the British cavalry saber design while he was serving as a brigade major with the British Cavalry in Flanders, during the Low Countries campaign in the early years of the French Revolutionary Wars (1793-1795). Upon returning to England, he enlisted the aid of English cutler and sword maker Henry Osborn and between them was born the Pattern 1796 Light Cavalry Saber. The saber had a curved blade with relatively short slashing tip, referred to as a “hatchet” tip. The blade was typically between 32 ½” and 33” long and had a simple stirrup shaped iron guard with languets on either side of the guard. The grip had a grooved wood core wrapped with braided cord and then wrapped with leather. A pair of iron ears extended from the back-strap on either side of the grip’s center, and a transverse pin reinforced the grip to the back-strap attachment; strengthening it and keeping the grip from wobbling or working itself loose from the hilt. The design was strictly for hacking and slashing, and not for thrusting designed as a standard fighting saber for the use of the light cavalry troopers and no “officers” pattern were made. While the British War Department often created specific, official “officers’” pattern swords for wear with dress uniforms, etc. no specific officers’ light cavalry saber was authorized or codified. As such, a variety of enhanced variants of the Pattern 1796 Light Cavalry Saber were produced for use and wear by officers. Some were little more than lightened versions of the trooper saber with wire wrap on the grip and some level of ornamentation on the blade, varying from simple acid etching to fire blued blades with gold gilt decorations. Heavily ornamented hilts were available as well. The popularity of Le Merchant’s design is also seen in the number of American sabers (often called “Bird’s Head” pommels) that are known from the era of the late 1790s through the early 1820s, often utilizing the same stirrup guard (often called “D” or “P” guards) in both brass and iron. The form seems to have been quite popular with mounted American militia officers during the Federal Era, and variants are known with connection to infantry, cavalry and artillery officers. As many American swords and sabers in the post-Revolutionary War through pre-War of 1812 era originated with the cutlers and swords makers in England, it is not surprising that current British military patterns were frequently imported by American retailers. Some American retailers acquired only their blades from England and hilted the swords themselves, but other retailers purchased completed swords from the English for sale in America.

This is a wonderful example of a British Pattern 1796 Light Cavalry Officers’ Sword that was clearly intended for the American market. The saber appears to be a slightly lighter version of the common trooper’s saber with the exception that the grip has no reinforcing ears, and the leather-covered grip has an additional wire wrap. However, when the blade is drawn from the iron scabbard, the acid etched blade with American military motifs is immediately apparent. Approximately 15” of the 29 ½” long curved blade is etched with a variety of martial images. The obverse starts with floral splays and an arched bridge near the ricasso, with the word WARRENTED etched over the bridge. This is followed by a martial panoply of drums, canons, flags and pole arms, with the central pole arm being tipped with the “liberty cap”. Next is another floral splay that is topped with a spread-winged American eagle. The eagle clutches the usual olive branch in it left talon and 3 arrows in its right, and has a banner bearing the de facto motto of the United States E. Pluribus Unum (out of many, one), secured in its beak. The breast of the eagle is an American flag shield with 11 vertical stripes on the lower portion and 16 stars on the upper portion. The number of stars is interesting; suggesting the saber dates to between 1796 and 1803, although it could date as late as 1820. In 1796 Tennessee entered the union as the 16th state, the first since the adoption of the 15-star flag in 1795. The 17th state, Ohio, entered the union in 1803, and was followed by Louisiana (#18) in 1812, Indiana (#19) in 1816 and Mississippi (#20) in 1817. However, the 15-star flag remained the official American flag until 1820, when it was replaced with a new 20-star flag. This does not mean that flags with different star counts were not used during the time, and for a period a 16-star and 16-stripe flag was used unofficially, circa 1797-1803. Above the American eagle is another floral splay. The reverse of the saber starts with the same style of floral decoration and arched bridge near the ricasso, and continued with floral splays up the blade. The central image is another martial panoply featuring a drum, a canon, pole arms (with the central one again tipped with a “Liberty Cap”) and a shield with an American flag motif. Again the shield has 11-vertical stripes on the lower portion and 16-stars on the upper portion. Above the martial display is another floral splay. The curved blade is 29 ½” in length and 1 1/8” wide at the ricasso and the spine is a ¼” wide at that location as well. A single, wide fuller extends from the ricasso approximately 21 ½” towards the tip of the saber. The stirrup hilt and back strap are of iron, as they would be for any but the highest end English P-1796 officer’s saber. The hilt is 4 ½” long and the overall length of the saber is about 34 ½”. The rear of the guard is slotted for a saber knot and a pair of 15/16” long iron languets, the same width as the blade, extend form the front of the guard. The top of the guard extends 1 ½” above the blade and is tipped with a flat, round quillon. The wooden grip is grooved with an obvious palm-swell and covered in thin dark brown leather. Seven wraps of bronze or copper wire are present in the grooves. The wire has a wound center strand, flanked by two plain strands of wire, quite similar to the wire found on US Model 1833 Dragoon sabers. Interestingly the 1833 Dragoon was based upon the replacement for the Pattern 1796 saber, the Pattern 1821 saber. Other than the word “WARRENTED” no other identifying mark can be found on the saber other than a very tiny letter stamped on the spine, which may be a “C” or “G”. If it is a “G”, it may suggest Thomas Gill made the saber for the American market. The saber is in about FINE overall condition. The frosted etching on both sides of the blade is very clear and crisp and is about 90%+ present. The highly polished blade retains about 85%+ of its original bright polish as well. The etched panels show only some minor discoloration from freckled surface oxidation and some scattered flecks of discoloration. The last 8” of the blade, from the end of the fuller to the tip has been very lightly cleaned, and some minor surface scratches are visible in the polished steel. The blade is free of any significant dings or nicks, but a few tiny impact marks can be felt along the cutting edge if you carefully run your thumb along it. This is typical of any old sword that probably saw some light use, and then some additional action as a family heirloom "toy" reenacting the deeds of grandpa or great-grandpa. The iron stirrup hilt and back strap have an untouched mottled gray and brown patina with a mostly dark brown even coloration along the back strap, and some small areas of scattered minor surface oxidation scattered over the hilt. The leather wrap is original and is about 80%+ present, with largest single area of loss being at the obverse rear of the grip, where it has flaked away and another piece of leather has lifted and may flake off soon as well. The other areas of loss are some small wear spots on the reverse of the grip. The wire all appears to be original, and remains relatively tight and secure, with only some minor looseness noted at the obverse rear where the leather wrap has started to flake. The saber is accompanied by its original iron scabbard, and fits it perfectly. The scabbard retains both original iron suspension rings and is complete, including its throat. The scabbard was painted black a very long time ago, possibly during the period of use or immediately thereafter as a means of protecting a family heirloom. The scabbard was then decorated on the obverse with gold paint in a floral motif between the mounts. Only about 30%-40% of this paint remains, having worn off the scabbard from handling, storage and use over the years. The scabbard remains solid with the only condition issues worth noting being a tiny seam crack, about ½” long, 3 ¼” below the lower drag, and pair of deep dents between the mounts on the reverse. The upper dent is the deeper and larger of the two. A smaller, thumb-sized dent is also present on the obverse just below the upper mount. The scabbard matches the saber well and the old painted decorations really add to the overall eye appeal of the saber.

While it is impossible to know the exact date of manufacture and the exact period of use of this sword, it is almost certainly c1800 and most likely pre-War of 1812. The number of stars in the etched panels and the overall pattern are typical of earlier, rather than later Federal Era officer’s swords, which tend to be more heavily embellished. This sword, with its relatively short 29 ½” blade was almost certainly an infantry officer’s or artillery officer’s saber and the iron scabbard suggest use while mounted. This is a very attractive sword with a wonderful blade and lovely etching. It would be a wonderful addition to any collection of early American swords. This is a scarce pattern, and I have only seen a handful of these English P-1796 officer type swords etched with American martial motifs. It is a sword you will no doubt be very glad to add to your collection and to display on your wall. $1895.00 REDUCED $1700.00

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U631. SAUERBIER M1850 STAFF & FIELD SWORD - PRESENTED TO ASST. SURGEON, NEW YORK 11TH REGIMENT NATIONAL GUARD INFANTRY: This is a high quality Sauerbier Staff & Field sword presented Asst. Surgeon Joseph Ward. The sword retains 95% original gold wash on all the brass and 100% original grip and wire, as well as a frosty blade. The presentation is on the reverse side of the top mounts and reads as follows.

Presented by

Wm Rankin Esq

To hisGrandson

Joseph B. Ward , MD

Newark, N.J.

June 25th 1862

The New York Eleventh Regiment, Washington Rifles was a National Guard unit and prior to April 27, 1835, there are no positive records of this regiment on file.  At that time the organization was known as the 2d Regiment, Washington Guards, New York State Light Infantry; about 1856 this designation was changed to 11th Regiment, "Washington Rifles."  It was disbanded January 14, 1899.

Its Service in the War of the Rebellion was short. It left New York City, its home station, May 28, 1862, commanded by Col. Joachim Maidhof, and was mustered into the service of the United States for three months, at Harper's Ferry, W. Va.  It served in the 2d Brigade, Sigel's Division, Department of Shenandoah, from June 8, 1862, and at Harper's Ferry, and was mustered out at New York City, to date September 16, 1862. In June 18, 1863, its ten companies, left the State under orders for thirty days' service, commanded by Colonel Maidhof, and preceded to Harrisburg, Pa.; it served in the 4th Brigade, 1st Division, Department Susquehanna, and was mustered out of the United States service, July 20, 1863, in New York City.

11th Regiment National Guard Infantry

Left State for Harper's Ferry, W. Va., May 28, 1862.Attached to 2nd Brigade, Sigel's Division, Dept. of the Shenandoah, and duty at Harper's Ferry until September. Mustered out September 16, 1862.

Again left State for Harrisburg, Pa., June 18, 1863.Attached to 4th Brigade, 1st Division, Dept. of the Susquehanna. Skirmish at Oyster Point, Pa., June 28. Mustered out July 20, 1863.

Joseph Ward was the units Assistant Surgeon during its initial 3-month service. He enlisted on 5/28/1862 at New York City, NY as an Asst. Surgeon and on 5/28/1862 was commissioned into Field & Staff, NY 11th Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 9/16/1862 at New York, NY.

Thought his military service was short, it is not often you find a presentation sword for a medical doctor during the Civil War. $4500.00 REDUCED $3800.00

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U638. PRESENTATION AMES 1850 MOUNTED OFFICERS SWORDS with HIGH-GRADE BRASS SCABBARD: This is an Ames Model 1850 Mounted Officers sword with a high-grade brass scabbard with a presentation. It reads Governor’s Guard to Dr. James Kent. July 4th 1860. There were several pre-war militia units that used the title Governor’s Guard. I believe this sword is associated with the Governor’s Guard from New York City. I have yet to connect the Governor’s Guard to a Dr. James Kent; however, the only James Kent listed in the Civil War data base as an officer was Lieutenant Colonel James Kent of the New York 21st Infantry. This may be his sword.  During my initial research, I did find reference to a military pass in the Columbia University Archives: Military Pass issued to James Kent Jr., signed by James Kent Jr. and Drake De Kay, July 4, 1861; which peaks the imagination and calls for more research.

There are two versions of the mounted offices sword, which are identical in all aspects except for the US etching. The earlier examples have the block US and the later version with the script style US. This example is has block lettering; however, it is larger is style to the standard version often seen. In fact, the eagle on this blade is much different with a spread wing flying design with the E Pluribus Unum ribbon under the bird.  The knuckle-bow is cast in a single piece and not spliced and more shallow then the standard Foot Officers sword. The blade is Ames marked with deep etching and a gray patina. The heavy brass scabbard has a beautiful raised eagle between the double ring top mount, the presentation between the mounts, and attractive chase work between the middle mount and the drag. The scabbard is also Ames marked. This is an extremely rare sword! $3200.00 REDUCED $2900.00

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U653. EMERSON & SILVER – SILVER HILT OFFICERS SWORD:  This sword, though not maker marked, is a product of Emerson & Silver of New Jersey. It is a Silver-Hilt foot or Staff Officers sword. The front of the guard is shaped like a foot officer’s sword, but has the US on both sides making it a Staff & Field version.  The hilt it tight with a great German silver grip with all original wire. The blade has very light etching, which is another common characteristic of Emerson & Silver, and has the white buff leather blade washer. What really makes this sword unique is the scabbard.  It is leather covered steel, which was something new at the time of the Civil War. Most of the time, the leather is damaged and partially or completely gone. This one is complete with all original mounts and screws and great chase work on the front. $2500.00 REDUCED $1900.00

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U679. AMES TYPE-2 M1850 STAFF & FIELD SWORD: This is an earlier version of the Ames M1850 Type-2 Staff & Field sword as is evident by the block etched US on the blade. The hilt is tight with no movement, and retains original gold on the basket, but not the pommel cap or scabbard mounts. The remaining bass has a mixed reddish-brown patina. The shark-skin grip and double strand wire is 100% original. The blade washer holds the blade is tight.  Blade length is 32 inches and retains much original frosting with the standard eagle; block etched US and Ames marking. The type-2 scabbard is complete with all brass fittings and original screws. It is dent free and the brass mounts have the same matching patina as the hilt.  The blue scabbard has taken on a nice rich brown patina. This sword shows evidence of being carried, but was well maintained. $2300.00 REDUCED $1900.00

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U687. NON-REGULATION FOOT OFFICERS SWORD: This is a Non-Regulation Foot Officers sword. Let me start by saying the photos do not do this sword justice. This is the way I like to find a sword. The patina is an even deep dark brown on the steel hilt and the scabbard. The blade shows some wear, but retains much original frosting. The guard and grip is tight, and retains 98% original shark-skin. The blade is maker marked W. Walscheid Solingen with the brass prove mark. The scabbard has two small door ding. If you are looking for a nice example with great patina, this is the one. $1150.00 REDUCED $875.00

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F155. CONFEDERATE - BARNETT ENFIELD RIFLE - SINCLAIR, HAMILTON & CO. MARKED : During the Civil War, a large number of 1853 Enfield rifles were supplied to the Confederacy by Barnett; however, they often reached out to other makers to help fill the contract. This Barnett Confederate P53 Enfield rifle is complete, and is marked Sinclair, Hamilton & Co. by the butt-plate tang. It is marked Barnett on the lock plate and has all original parts and still has strong rifling in the barrel. The stock is on great condition and the lock functions well and holds in both half & full cock position. $2800.00 REDUCED $2400.00

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F211. COLT 1851 NAVY REVOLVER, 1858: This is a good solid example of a Colt 1851 Navy Revolver that was built in 1858, and marked with the Hartford Address, which only appeared on this model from approx. 1858 up to April 1861.  Many collectors feel the Colt revolvers with the Hartford address have a strong association to the Confederacy. It has the standard 7-1/2" octagonal barrel with six shot cylinder and walnut grips. There appears to be a factory error with the serial number because 87789 appears on all parts to include the grip, except for one part numbered 88789. These numbers are within the same production time frame, and the die-stamped numbers are the same; human error.  Even the fragile hand-inked number on the inside of the grips is still visible and matching; 87789. There is still some trace silver on some brass, and some original blue on the underside of the loading lever. Overall the gun is brown. The cylinder scene is visible as well as the COLT PATENT No. 88789. The nipples are to perfict and I believe they have beenreplaces. The rifling is strong and the action is tight. $2700.00 REDUCED $2500.00

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F213. STARR .36 CAL. NAVAL REVOLVER: This Starr revolver is a unique revolver developed prior and used during the Civil War.  It was designed with a sliding switch on the trigger to allow the soldier or sailor to use the gun in a double-action configuration, or single-action by cocking it with the main trigger and using a second smaller trigger to fire the gun.  You will see the more common Army version all the time, but the Naval .36 Caliber version is rare to find.  This Navy Starr revolver has a gray-brown patina and only small traces of original blue. The frame is marked Starr Patent Jan. 15. 1856 on one side, and Starr Arms Co. New York on the other side. All screws are original to the gun. The bore has strong rifling, the cylinder nipples appear original, the original grip has a trace cartouche on the left side, and the upper and lower receiver, as well the grip, have matching serial number 2294. Overall, this is a great example of a rare and not often seen Navy Starr Revolver. $1750.00 REDUCED $1650.00

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