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ACRYLIC SWORD & SCABBARD STAND: This pair of acrylic sword & scabbard stands was designed to hold one sword and its scabbard. Each is 5 inches tall and designed with square edge groves to prevent the sword or scabbard from flipping over as often happens with similar stands with a rounded cut. They will accommodate swords of all sized from small bowie knives to cavalry sabers.  This design presents a very clean and crisp display that is attractive. $29.00

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U957. HIGH – GRADE / PRESENTATION QUALITY / STAFF & FIELD SWORDS: This is an outstanding example of a High – Grade / Presentation Quality Staff & Field sword! The fancy German Silver grip is in near perfect condition except for a small ding on top, and the guard and pommel cap are tight. The “Key Stone” stamp at the base of the blade identified the sword maker as “Emerson & Silver” New Jersey and the retailer was “Henry Folsom” St. Louis Mo. Henry Folsom was in business 1860-1864 and advertised military good and presentation swords in 1863. The officers who purchased this sword wanted to invest in the outward appearance of the hilt and scabbard. The hilt had enhanced chase work on the pommel cap and inside guard, and a ruby eye eagle head quillon; both stones are original. The scabbard has high grade medallion mounts with the American eagle on the top, a panoply of arms in the middle with a UNION on the center ribbon, and a standing soldier and flags on the drag. To offset the cost, the blade etching is very simple. One side is entirely void of etching and on the other is a spread eagle with 10 stars to each side for a total of 20. The stars represent the twenty free Union states: Maine, New York, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Kansas, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, California, Nevada, and Oregon.  The Union refers to the national government of the United States of America during the Civil War (1861-1865) made up of twenty free states and four border. This is an outstanding sword! $6900.00

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A historical folder is included with the saber. To read, click on the above Missouri State seal.

U958. CENTE GARDE CAVALRY OFFICER’S SWORD – SCHUYLER, HARTLEY & GRAHAM – MISSOURI IDENTIFED: This newly discovered, and previous unknown, example of a Cente Garde Cavalry Officer’s saber recently surfaced out of Missouri. Other known Cente Garde sabers have a guard with a large medallion with an America Eagle in its center: John Thilmann’s book “Civil War Cavalry & Artillery Sabers” describes it on page 399. This saber is similar, but with a four-branch guard. The hilt retains much of the original gold wash, 100% horn grip, and triple strand wire. The white buff leather blade washer holds the 38 1/2-inch blade tight.  These sabers were imported from France by Schuyler, Hartley & Graham, and as such will have French markings on the spine, which is dated 1862, and French hallmarks at the base of the blade. However, this sword is etched Schuyler, Hartley & Graham New York leaving no doubt it is an American Civil War sword, and currently the only know example with this hilt and so marked. The scabbard is a standard plain steel version. I purchased this sword from a direct decedent of Captain Benjamin F. Buzard. He served in the 13th MO Infantry which became the 25th MO Infantry, and later the Missouri 1st Engineers. Buzard did survive the war and has a Pension record on file at the National Archives. This is the only known example of a 4-branch style Cente Garde saber retailed by, and marked: Schuyler, Hartley & Graham - New York. $7500.00

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U921. M1850 FOOT OFFICER’S SWORD – SCHNITZLER & KIRSCHBAUM (S&K) - RARE!: This is a "RARE" Schnitzler & Kirschbaum (S&K) M1850 Foot Officer’s sword. The hilt has a mellow patina with traced of original gold wash; is tight; retains 100% original sharkskin grip and triple-strand wire. The blade is firm although the leather washer is gone. The 31 1/2-inch blade has never been cleaned and retains strong etching with some original frosting under a gray patina and slight salt & pepper spotting. It has never been sharpened and has a sharp point. The blade is Schnitzler & Kirschbaum Solingen marked with “IRON PROOF” on the spine. The black leather scabbard has expected crazing, but is solid and complete with all original mounts and screws. This is a great example of a rarely seen S&K M1850 Foot Officer’s sword. $1500.00

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C434. CONFEDERATE SIDE KNIFE - ALABAMA: This is Confederate Side Knife complete with the original sheath.  Since there are at less six known examples of this style Confederate knife, it can be considerate arsenal made. I have been told it was made in Alabama. All have a clip-point blade of various lengths with similar casting flaws and filing marks. The wood slab grips can be attached with screws or rivets as this example is and the two other known examples shown below. The sheath is in near-mint condition complete with the belt loop. Notice it is stitched the same as the sheath on the D-Guard & “DEATH TO ABOLITION” examples, with the grip identical to the latter. This is by far the best example in near-mint condition.  $2500.00

 

IDENTICAL STYLE SHEATH AND GRIP TO THESE TWO EXAMPLES

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U955. USMC - M1850 STAFF NCO SWORD - POST CIVIL WAR This is a post-Civil War (1870’s) version of the United State Marine Corps M1850 Staff NCO. The hilt is tight with all original leather and double-strand wire. The brass has a nice even mellow brown patina.  The original blade washer keeps the blade tight.  The blade has an even patina, and has the standard etching for a Horstmann blade with USMC in the center panel. The blade is 27 3/4-inch long. $1300.00

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U956. CIVIL WAR PERIOD - ROBY BLADE – BENT & BUSH - USMC - UNITED STATE MARINE CORPS BOY MUSICIAN'S SWORD:  This is a rare Civil War USMC Musician’s sword with a Roby blade, but Roby did not have a contact and some believe this sword was fabricated by Bent & Bush. The sword is 31 1/2 inches long with a 25 3/4-inch blade and a half counterguard on the reverse side of the guard. Civil War period Marine Corps sword will be void of any Marine Corps etching, and Musician's swords with USMC etching are post-war.  The hilt is tight with the original blade washer.  The half sized reverse clam shell is turned down and has some simple chase work. The forward clam shell is slightly bent, and the leather scabbard has a repair. The blade is Roby marked and has a floral design running half the length of the fuller and is nick free. Here is a chance to add a rare Marine sword to your Civil War collection. $1900.00

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"Z"

F322. CONFEDERATE CLEANED & REPAIRED “Z” MARKED - M1816 SPRINGFIELD MUSKET: The recently published book “CAPTURED & COLLECTED: CONFEDERATE REISSUED ARMS” by Cpt. Steve W. Knott, USN (ret.) is an outstanding reference source for the identification of rifles recovered from the battlefield and returned to Richmond to be repaired; refurbished; cleaned; and reissued.  Some of these guns have obvious repairs, and others where fully functional and just needed cleared; but in all cases, each gun was tested for functionality and then approved for re-issue by an inspector. This gun has a Belgium conversion; it is smooth bore; has an original ram-rod; an 1838 Springfield lock, and a barrel with the same date. The stock is in great condition with no breaks, and the carved initials “PB” and the faint carving of some other initials possibly “C C.” On the underside, forward of the trigger tang, is stamped the letter “Z”. The “Z” mark is associated with Captain Louis Zimmer, who was involved with Confederate cleaning and repair operations at Richmond. There is a second mark, but it is hard to discern. As a smooth-bore musket, this would have been an early battlefield recovered gun carried by a Union troop before being issue a 1861 Springfield rifle. $1900.00

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"T"

F348. CONFEDERATE CLEANED & REPAIRED “T” MARKED P1853 3-BAND ENFIELD RIFLE WITH A SERIAL NUMBERED “2793 A” BUTT PLATE: This is an exceptional example of a Confederate Pattern 1853 3-band Enfield Rifle that was recovered off a battlefield, sent back to Richmond to be refurbished; cleaned; repaired; and reissued. When you look at a C&R weapon, they are repaired, and the parts may not have matching assembly marks or will not be a perfect fit. Some people think these guns should be unflawed as if original, but that is incorrect and often not the case!  It is the flaws that show what work was performed to make the gun serviceable. In fact, you hope to find the repair issues! Under the butt plate the stock is marked “\I/”, but the serial number butt plate is marked “|” and is number “2793 A.” There is a ding on top of the number 7 that makes it initial look like a 9, but under magnification you can see the original number. The barrel, lock and lock screws are marked “IIII” and the barrel retention screw is marked “II”. All the barrel bands are unmarked. The stock, barrel and ram-rod have been shorten by 2 inches; the hammer has a brazed repaired; and the front site has been moved and repaired, and the noise-cap replaced. Serial number butt-plate guns have 1861 dated locks, but this one is dated 1862, which is another C&R repair. From the amount of work, it is obvious the original rifle sustained a good amount of battle damage. Finally, this rare serial number butt plate may be original or a C&R replaced part. There are only a few known “A” numbered guns and this now qualifies as one since it went through the C&R repaired process. On the underside, forward of the trigger tang, is stamped the C&R inspection letter “T", which is rarly seen. Finally, I found no other Confederate inspection marks on the stock, leading to the question: Was the gun originally Confederate or Union captured? This is a great example of a Confederate C&R Enfield Rifle with a “A” Serial Number butt plate. $6500.00

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CLICK THE ABOVE ICON TO READ THE COMPLETE HISTORY FOLDER

F352. 55TH MASSACHUSETTS INFANTRY REGIMENT (COLORED TROOPS) – IDENTIFIED ENFIELD RIFLE, CARTRIDGE BOX & FIELD MIRROR: In the Mid-1980’s, an Enfield Rifle, Cartridge box and a field shaving mirror were sold at an estate sale by an African-American (Black) family, who were descendants of a Colored Soldier from the 55th Massachusetts Infantry Regiments. These items were sold off individually and after a 30+ year search, have been reunited. Unfortunately, the record of the sale is not available, and the family history is gone, but luckily each item was Civil War period marked with the soldier’s name: Steven Ward. The name Steven L Ward is stenciled on the flat area of the Enfield opposite the lock, as well as on the field Shaving mirror, and the name Steven Ward is stenciled on the underside of the cartridge box flap, and the backside of the shoulder strap. These two versions of the name are helpful, but present a challenge for a positive identification since no living descendant exist, and will require extensive research of the names and each item for characteristics unique to the 55th Massachusetts infantry. The Civil War data-base list two Union soldiers named Stephen L. Ward, and eighteen soldiers with the name Stephen Ward, of which three were African-American (Colored).  Many of these soldiers can be eliminated because they had late enlistments; served in non-combat or non-infantry units, or were not issued Enfield rifles.  This narrows the list to the two soldiers with the name Stephen L. Ward, and the three African-American (Colored) privates.

Of the two named Stephen L. Ward, one was from the 1st Michigan Light Artillery and enlisted 9/6/1864 and mustered-out 8/1/1865. His enlistment period is late in the war and he would not have been issued an Enfield Rifles. The second soldier was from the 13th New Jersey Infantry, and though he had an early enlistment of 8/25/1862 and survived the war, his unit did not receive Enfield rifles, but carried Springfield Rifles.  Based on these facts, these two soldiers can be ruled out in regards to these identified items. This leaves the three African-American (Colored) soldiers with the same name Stephen Ward.

The first enlisted on 7/19/1863 into the US Colored Troop, 4th Cavalry, New Orleans. This unit was issued cavalry carbines and would not have received Enfield rifles. The second enlisted on 5/27/1865 into Company A, 128th United States Colored Infantry. As a late-war Federal unit, it is possible it received Enfield rifles, but more likely Springfield rifles. Also, as a late-war enlistment, this solder would have been issued a model 1864 cartridge not the 1861 version.

The third Colored soldier is Private Stephen Ward of the 55th Massachusetts Infantry. He enlisted 5/29/1863 into the 55th Massachusetts Infantry and was killed in action on 11/30/1864 at Honey Hill, SC. He was born in Tennessee and was most likely a slave who escaped to Ohio. This 55th was issued Confederate Enfield Rifles from captured blockade runner ships, purchased in Prize Auctions by the State of Massachusetts.  This, as well as some other details mention later, make it highly probable this identified group belongs to Private Stephen Ward of the 55th Massachusetts Infantry. CLICK TO READ THE COMPLETE HISTORY FOLDER.  $12,500.00

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U959. CENTE GARDE CAVALRY OFFICER’S SWORD – SCHUYLER, HARTLEY & GRAHAM This Cente Garde sabers has a guard with a large medallion with an America Eagle in its center: John Thilmann’s book “Civil War Cavalry & Artillery Sabers” describes it on page 399. There are two different "Cent Garde" pattern sabers with a centered medallion. This example has a solid center medallion with no open spaces as pictured in Schuyler, Hartley & Graham Civil War period catalog. It has an American eagle applied to the silver inset with three branches coming off the knuckle bow. The grip is polished horn with fine twisted brass wire. The 37 1/4-inch straight blade has two fullers running the entire length. The spine of the unetched blade has French maker marked with proof marks at its base. The scabbard is undecorated steel. Currently, there is another known example for sale at $7000.00. $6500.00 ******************************************************************************************************************************
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C378. CONFEDERATE OFFICER’S SWORD - FEATURED ON PAGE 248 COLLECTING THE CONFEDERANCY by SHANNON PRITCHARD: This is an unidentified Confederate officer’s sword, which is featured on the center of page 248 of the book Collecting the Confederacy by Shannon Pritchard. The pommel cap has a heavy design; the grip is leather with no wire; the guard is sand cast with great flaws and file marks and is tight; and an unusually broad blade and a top-stitched scabbard with screwed mounts. The 30 1/4-inch straight blade appears to be unetched, but while taking photos I saw the ghost image of C S A etched on it. The top stitch scabbard is 100% complete with no breaks and retains all original brass mounts and screws. It fits perfect to the blade. $4200.00

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C435. RARE - CONFEDERATE BOYLE, GAMBLE & MACFEE FOOT OFFICER'S SWORD: This Confederate Boyle Gamble & Macfee Officer Sword is totally untouched; attic fresh; and complete with the original scabbard and original mounts.  The patina is civil war relics perfect! The original grip is near-mint with original heavy brass wire and is tight. The sword is 35 inches long with a straight 29 1/2" blade that has an unstopped fuller and great casting flaws associated with Boyle Gamble sword. The blade is in great condition with pleasing gray patina & completely smooth metal. The bottom of the distinctive guard is maker marked: Boyle Gamble & MacFee Richmond. The original scabbard is complete and fits tight the sword swords. It has all original mounts, to include the drag, and the leather is strong with no breaks or repairs.  Most of the time this sword is found without a scabbard! The last complete example sold in auction for $9988.00 plus the added buyer premium.   $7900.00

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C438. HAIMAN - CONFEDERATE CAVALRY SABER: This sword was once in Kevin Hoffman’s collection and I acquired it from The Horse Soldier in Gettysburg. Kevin had identifed this saber in his on-line Civil War Preservation / Sword of Honor as a Confederate cavalry - Artillery pommel - Douglass.

At the North Georgia Relic Hunters show, I was able to do a side-by-side compairson with several known Haiman saber, and was able to confirm that this is a Haiman saber. It is well-made with some upgrades not normally found on an enlisted cavalry saber, and may be an officer's version. The pommel cap is more of an artillery design; the grip is high-grade leather with a heavy single-strand brass wire not common to an enlisted saber; and the scabbard is higher quality. Both the grip and wire are tight with no movement in the guard. The 35 1/4-inch blade is held tight with a black leather blade washed, and has great casting flaws common to a Haiman saber blade.  The lapped seam steel scabbard has a brass throat with brass ring mounts; steel rings, and a steel drag. The seam is well made and brazed with brass, not lead. Overall, a pristine high-quality example of a Confederate Cavalry saber. Thought it is most likely an officers saber, I am offering at the prices equal to that of an enlisted saber of the same quality. $5100.00

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C442. KENANSVILLE CAVALRY SABER – TYPE-2 or SECOND MODEL – LEECH & RIGDON SCABBARD: This is a Type-2 or Second Model Kenansville Cavalry Saber in a Leech & Rigdon scabbard. The saber perfectly fits the scabbard and both have matching patina, which is a good indication the two have been together and may have been paired as such during the war. The hilt, pommel cap and grip are tight with original leather and marked “X X X X” on the guard. The blade has never been sharpened and has great patina. The scabbard has been identified as Leech & Rigdon by a well-known appraiser who has worked for James D. Julia, Morphy & Poulin auctions. The scabbard is of high-quality with a brass throat, brass mounts, brass rings and a brass drag and a nice lapped seam. The quality is as good as known officers’ scabbards. $6100.00

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F348. CONFEDERATE CLEANED & REPAIRED “T” MARKED P1853 3-BAND ENFIELD RIFLE WITH A SERIAL NUMBERED BUTT PLATE: This is an exceptional example of a Confederate Pattern 1853 3-band Enfield Rifle that was recovered off a battlefield, sent back to Richmond to be refurbished, cleaned, repaired and reissued. When you look at a C & R weapon, they are repaired, and the parts may not have matching assembly marks or will be a perfect fit. Some people think these guns should be unflawed as if original, but that is incorrect and often not the case!  It is the flaws that show what work was performed to make the gun serviceable. In fact, you hope to find the repair issues! Under the butt plate the stock is marked “\I/”, but the serial number butt plate is marked “|” and is number “2993 A.” The barrel, lock and lock screws are marked “IIII” and the barrel retention screw is marked “II”. All the barrel bands are unmarked. The stock, barrel and ram-rod have been shorten by 2 inches; the hammer has a brazed repaired; and the front site has been moved and repaired, and the noise-cap replaced.  From the amount of work, it is obvious the original rifle sustained a good amount of battle damage. Finally, this serial number butt plate is not original to the gun, but was replaced during the C & R process and is very rare. There are only a few “A” numbered guns and this now qualifies as one since it was C &  R repaired. On the underside, forward of the trigger tang, is stamped the C & R inspection letter “T". Also, I found no Confederate inspection marks on the stock, which leads me to believe this may have originally been a Union gun. This is a great example of a Confederate C & R  Enfield Rifle with a Serial Number butt plate. $6500.00

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F321. CONFEDERATE PURCHASED JS-ANCHOR MARKED KERR REVOLVER: The London Armoury Company Kerr’s Patent Revolver is one of the most distinctive and instantly recognizable of all Civil War era handguns. The Kerr patent revolver was invented by James Kerr, who was awarded two patents for improvements to Roberts Adams’ earlier revolver designs. Kerr had been a founding member of the London Armoury Company, which was established on February 9, 1856 and of which Adams was the Managing Director during the late 1850s. With the outbreak of the American Civil War, Caleb Huse (the South’s primary purchasing agent in England) engaged the London Armory Company to produce all the Kerr’s Patent revolvers that they could for delivery to the Confederacy. It is believed that nearly all of the L.A.C.’s output of Kerr revolvers from April of 1861 through the close of the Civil War was produced on contract for the Confederacy, with about 9,000 pistols produced and shipped to the south during that time. The estimate regarding revolver production is based upon the extant examples with Confederate provenance or marks, which tend to exist in the 1,5XX to about the 10,XXX serial number range. However, a handful of legitimate CS inspected Kerr’s do appear in the 7XX to 1,5XX range, indicating that some of the earliest purchases were filled from already assembled revolvers on hand. To date, at least three separate Confederate government contracts have been identified for the purchase of Kerr revolvers. Two were army contracts, and one was a 1,000-gun contract for the Confederate Navy. One of the standard indicators of CS importation and usage of a Kerr revolver is the presence of the JS / {ANCHOR} inspection mark that is found on the front of the wooden grip of the pistols, below the grip frame tang. This is the inspection mark of John Southgate, who acted as a “viewer” (arms inspector) forthe Confederacy.

The Kerr’s Patent Revolver offered here is a well-used Confederate inspected example is in about VERY GOOD condition. This gun retains a very clear Confederate JS / {ANCHOR} inspection mark in the checkered grip on the front strap. The gun is serial numbered 1897 on the right side of the frame and on the cylinder. The left side of the frame is marked with the two-line arced cartouche that reads LONDON / ARMOURY. Alternating (Crown) / V and (Crown) / GP London commercial view and proof marks are also found between the chambers of the cylinder. The left upper flat of the octagonal barrel is marked near the frame: L.A.C. along with the commercial London view and proof marks of a {Crown} / GP and {Crown} / V, reading from the muzzle to the frame. The original cylinder pin retention spring is present and fully functional, and the action works, with the revolver timing, indexing and locking up as it should most of the time, but sometimes is sluggish. The gun has an even brown patina with patches of darker surface oxidation; complete grips; lanyard stub, but no ring. Despite the wear and finish loss, the revolver retains good edges and lines with some scattered bumps, dings and pitting present on the metal. The bore of the revolver remains in about VERY GOOD condition as well with strong rifling its entire length, with light pitting. A clear Confederate JS / {ANCHOR} inspection mark is present on the face of the grip and remains quite visible. Overall, this is a nice, solid example of a Kerr’s Patent Revolver complete with a clear JS / {ANCHOR} inspection mark. $4600.00

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U960. SAUERBIER NON-REGULATION PATTERN 1821/22 CAVALRY OFFICER’S SABER: This non-regulation saber must have been made for a mounted officer, artillery officer, or a cavalry officer because the blade is both long and heavy, which made it a very serviceable saber. The non-regulation hilt retains 100% original gilt and 100% original leather and triple-strand wire. The Sauerbier marked blade has deep strong etching with much original frosting under a nice gray patina. The steel scabbard is in near-mint condition and is decorated with the flame throat piece, panoply of arms and the skull and crossbones ring mounts, and the large drag. $3400.00

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F342. SAVAGE NAVY REVOLVER: The Savage “Navy” self-cocking revolver is possibly the most ungainly handguns of the Civil War. The .36 caliber, 6-shot revolver had a 7” octagonal barrel and an innovative ring-cocking action and a moving gas seal cylinder. The gun featured a unique ring-shaped cocking lever inside the heart shaped trigger guard, which was used to advance the cylinder and cock the hammer. The shooter could then fire the gun with the traditional trigger. The Savage Revolving Firearms Company secured its first official US military contract directly with the US government on October 16, 1861. This contract called for Savage to deliver 5,000 pistols between October 1861 and March 1862. Another contract was received from the government in November of 1861 to supply an additional 5,000 revolvers between November 1861 and May of 1862. Of the approximately 20,000 Savage “Navy” models produced during the Civil War, the US Ordnance Department took delivery of 11,384 of the guns, and the Navy took delivery of 1,126. The balance of approximately 8,500 guns wereoffered for civilian sale. This gun appears to be one of the private/civilian sales,which individual soldiers and officers could purchase, and the serial number #6547 makes it an early gun.  It is all original and has an even gray patina; the cylinder properly functions with all original nipples and the action is tight; the front site is original and the grips are as well. The maker mark on the top is hard to photo due to the stippling created from gun power, but it is there under magnification. $1800.00

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F343. SAVAGE NAVY REVOLVERThe Savage “Navy” self-cocking revolver is possibly the most ungainly handguns of the Civil War. The .36 caliber, 6-shot revolver had a 7” octagonal barrel and an innovative ring-cocking action and a moving gas seal cylinder. The gun featured a unique ring-shaped cocking lever inside the heart shaped trigger guard, which was used to advance the cylinder and cock the hammer. The shooter could then fire the gun with the traditional trigger. The Savage Revolving Firearms Company secured its first official US military contract directly with the US government on October 16, 1861. This contract called for Savage to deliver 5,000 pistols between October 1861 and March 1862. Another contract was received from the government in November of 1861 to supply an additional 5,000 revolvers between November 1861 and May of 1862. Of the approximately 20,000 Savage “Navy” models produced during the Civil War, the US Ordnance Department took delivery of 11,384 of the guns, and the Navy took delivery of 1,126. The balance of approximately 8,500 guns were offered for civilian sale. This gun appears to be one of the private/civilian sales, which individual soldiers and officers could purchase, and the serial number #1878 makes it a very early gun.  It is all original and retains much original blue finish; the cylinder properly functions with all original nipples and the action is tight; the front site is original and the grips are as well. The maker mark on the top is very crisp. $2900.00

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“Z”

F353. CONFEDERATE - "Z" MARKED - CAPTURED, CLEANED, REPAIRED & REISSUED SPRINGFIELD RIFLEThis is an example of a Springfield rifle, which was Confederate captured, cleaned, repaired, and reissued (C&R). The gun is in great condition with no breaks or major issues. On the underside, forward of the trigger tang, is stamped the letter “Z”. Many captured and reissued Confederate weapons simply required a light cleaning in order to pass inspection. Others, required more extensive work. Some people think these guns should be unflawed as if original, but that is incorrect and often not the case!  It is the flaws that show what work was performed to make the gun serviceable. In fact, you hope to find the repair issues! After completing the work, the weapon would have been tested for functionality and then approved for re-issue by an inspector and marked with their respective stamp “A, F, Q, T, Z, D” before being shipped off for issuance in the Army of Northern Virginia. This gun is in great condition, and looks like the repair was a replaced barrel. When Springfield produced the rifle, a matching production year was stamped on the lock plate and the barrel. Here the lock is dated 1862, but no date on the barrel, but you can see vice-clamp marks, which is common on Confederate repaired rifles. The action holds in both half & full cock, and the bore has strong rifling. On the underside of the stock near the butt-plate are two carves XX’s. This was most likely done by a soldier and not during the C&R process. $3200.00

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C437. RARE – CONFEDERATE SHORT ARTILLERY SWORD:  This was once in Kevin Hoffman’s collection, and is one of the rarest and hardest Confederate short artillery swords to find. The maker is unknown, but believed to be from Alabama. It is well made, and complete with the original scabbard. The scabbard appears to be Boyle & Gamble design, but fits this sword and not the other Boyle & Gamble short swords I have. The hilt is tight; has a deep rich brown patina; as does the blade which is pitted. The scabbard leather is weak and flimsy with separation on the back side, but retains both original mounts. $3900.00

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