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C259. CONFEDERATE BOWIE - SIDE KNIFE: This Confederate Bowie Side-knife was recently discovered in Louisiana, and is an amazing find. From end to end the knife is 18 inches with a 11 1/4 inch spear point blade. The blade has never been cleaned and has great untouched patina. The original leather blade washer is complete and keeps the knife tight, and the solid wooded grip looks to be from a tool such as a file. The scabbard is a piece of art. It is leather covered wood with tin for the throat, drag and sides. You can see some leather lose, which exposes the wood, and you will notice the patina is perfict as well. Also, there is a flat button attached to the throat for use with a frog device. The scabbard design was influenced by a designed common to French short sword, and since the knife was discovered in Louisiana, the French influence would be strong. Also, the throat and drag are held in place with period staples. The cross-guard is made of pewter and has a hair-line crack, but is strong. This is a rare find! $3800.00

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C264.  CONFEDERATE ARTILLERY BOWIE KNIFE, VIRGINIA SOLDIER Id'ED. This huge Confederate Bowie knife has some distinct Georgia traits. The cast brass hilt is the same as found on the Macon, Georgia manufactured McElroy knife and the blade has the distinctive reverse edge of the Georgia Armory Type VII. The knife measures 20.5 inches from pommel to point, and the hilt is as tight as the day it was made. The down turned bull horn cross guard is seemingly ideal for a fighting knife. The blade remains bright in some areas, but pitted in others.

The scabbard is extraordinarily well made as the knife.  The leather body is form fitted to the blade and the throat is lined with tin covered in leather.  The stitching remains tight, fits the knife perfectly, and the leather is in excellent condition.

The name, “H.F. Harris” over “88 1861” is inked on the scabbard outer side. There is only one “H.F. Harris” in service in 1861 that matches: H. F. Harris (Hawkey F. Harris) who started his military career in the 88th Virginia Militia, which accounts for the 88 and 1861 on the scabbard.   His later service in the VA Albemarle Light Artillery is perfect to the knife, as an Artillery sword/knife.  He most likely carried it during the time served with the Virginia 57th Infantry Regiment. Click on this hyper-link http://azswords.com/Harris.htm to see his military history. In addition, this is a binder included with copies of his muster sheets for service with the 88th Virginia and the VA Albemarle Light Artillery, 1st Virginia Artillery.  It is extremely rare to know the identity and find the history of a Confederate soldier and the weapon he carried. $6500.00

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C285. GEORGIA CONFEDERATE D-GUARD: This Georgia Confederate D-Guard is believed to have been made by the Cooper Iron Works, Etowah, Georgia. Mark Cooper’s biography notes they made war knives for all the officers and men of the Atlanta Grays and the Floyd Infantry…and a few knives were of fearsome size and dimensions, blades measuring sixteen to eighteen inches long and three inches wide.  It is assumed that approximately 200 knives were made at the Iron Works; only 10 Cooper Iron Works knives were known to exist when the book “Confederate Bowie Knives” by Jack Milton, Josh Phillips & John Sexton was published. If you have this book, look at pages 64-73 and compare this knife to the images and information, and you will come to the same conclusion that this is a Cooper Iron Works enlisted man’s knife, and the only example with a blade over 16 inches. This knife is 21 3/4 inches long with a 17 inch x 2 inch blade, and a blade thickness of .25 inch. It is well made from high quality steel, has manufacturing file marks and other visible flaws. The guard is iron, has a bend similar to the knife on page 68 of the book, but with a 2 1/2 inch guillon. The turned wood grip has 12 cut rings and traces of original black paint, and a lead covered brass ferrule to the front. The guard is penned to the grip with no back-side ferrule. The knife was complete with a leather scabbard that has lead rivets and cotton stitching, and a reinforced toe. The scabbard does not look like any of the known Cooper knife scabbard, and may be original or a period field replacement. Regardless it was discovered with the knife, as well as a red wool belt. The belt has some period repairs and has a weak area on the back side and a leather strap with a buckle.  $6200.00

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C286. D-GUARD BOWIE KNIFE: This D-Guard Bowie recently was discovered and is fresh to the market. It is 18 inches long with a 14 1/4 inch blade. The blade is very thin with a pronounced clip point; has filing marks, a few small nicks, and was period sharpened. The oak wood grip appears to be a tool handle with a steel ferrule, and the guard is thin brass. Looking at the area when the brass is penned to the wood, it is obvious the guard is original to the knife.  The brass also has traces of a black lacquered finish, not paint.  This is the first knife of this style I have seen. $900.00

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U733. M1840 NCO SWORD – AMES: This early dated (1862) M1840 NCO sword made Ames. The sword shows evidence of being carried, but not abused. The brass has a nice patina; the original red blade washer is presents, the inspection mark ACH is on the guard and drag, with A.D.K. on the blade. The blade is bright with no nicks or rust and has a shape point. The leather scabbard is strong with expected crazing and a little leather loss near the bottom mount, but retains all original rivets. Early dated NCO swords are rare to find, especially in such nice condition.  $525.00

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U734. M1840 MUSICIAN SWORD – EMERSON & SILVER / HORSTMAN: This M1840 Musician sword was made by Emerson & Silver, but retailed by Horstman. It is an early piece most likely made prior to or at the beginning of the Civil War since it has the early Key Stone mark of Emerson & Silver, a metal scabbard with the two rivet top mount and the three rivet drag, and Horstman PHILa mark. The hilt it tight with all brass having matching patina. The 28 inch blade has a nice gray patina, no nicks, and a sharp point. The scabbard has much of the original finish and the drag has several dents indicating it was carried. The majority of Musician swords you will see were made by Ames, so it is rare to find one made by Emerson & Silver and retailed by Horstman. At this price, you can’t go wrong. $350.00

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C287. ISAAC & Co. CONFEDERATE SABER: This is an Isaac & Co. Model 1853 cavalry saber, which the Confederate government purchased in England during the War Between the States. When you look at these sabers, always look to see it the Isaac & Co. mark is on the spine of the blade near the guard. This saber has that marks. The hilt has a nice patina and is tight, and the pressed leather grip show wear, but is very nice. The blade has a nice even patina and is fairly bright with no nicks or rust. The scabbard has an even brown patina with several dings and dents’, indicating it was carried. The scabbard did its job of protecting the blade. The last one I sold went for $4000.00; however, this is available for less. $3100.00

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U729. 152nd NEW YORK INFANTRY REGIMENT IDENTIFIED OFFICERS SWORD: This sword is identified to Captain William R. Wall, 152nd New York Infantry Regiment. He is the only Union officer with this name. He was 24 at the time of his enlistment on 9/20/1862 at Mohawk, NY as a Captain. On 11/3/1862 he was commissioned into "D" Co. NY 152nd Infantry and was discharged on 1/10/1863 for an enlistment just over 3 months. During his time of service, the regiment left the state and served in the Provisional Brigade, Afcercrombie’s Division, in the defense of Washington from October 1862 in the District of Washington. This short stay in the military accounts for the high quality condition of this sword. The hilt is the large version Foot Officers style with 100% original shark-skin grip and double-strand wire. The blade is Collins made and dated 1862, and retailer marked Schuyler Hartley & Graham, New York. This blade is in mint condition with original frosting and a panel with the spread eagle and one with the U S. The scabbard is strong with some crazing and a little leather lose with a door ding would be. The mounts all have a pleasing look with the reverse side on the top mount marked Wm. R Wall.  $2500.00

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U723. PRESENTATION M1850 STAFF & FIELD OFFICERS SWORD, 149TH NEW YORK: This M1850 Staff & Field sword was presented to Lieutenant William Savage, Company C, 149th New York Volunteers. He enlisted on 8/23/1862 at Syracuse, NY as a 2nd Lieutenant; was commissioned into "C" Co. NY 149th Infantry and was discharged on 3/29/1863. For unknown reasons, Lt. Savage’s had a short enlistment. During his time with the regiment it served in Casey's Division, defenses of Washington, from September 26, 1862; in the 3d Brigade, 2d Division, 12th Corps, from September 30, 1862; in the 3d Brigade, 2d Division, 20th Corps and took part in the following engagements: Near Ripon, Va. November 9, 1862--no loss, and Charleston, W. Va. December 2, 1862--no loss. Lt. Savage was with his command during the march to Fredericksburg and the Mud March, but was discharge just prior to the Chancellorsville Campaign. The sword shows evidence of being carried, but is in great shape. The hilt is tight and great chase work with some traces of original gold wash. The sharkskin grip is 100% with its double-strand wire. The original white-buff blade washer keeps the blade tight. The sword is maker marked Collins & Co. and dated 1862, and retailer marked Willard & Hawley Syracuse, NY. The blade has a gray patina with strong etching. The scabbard is a work of art with embossed leather and high grade mounts. The top mount has a raised Federal Eagle and is engraved with the presentation

Presented to

LIEUt. Wm. SAVAGE

149th N.Y.V.

by Co. C.

The middle mount has a large US on the back side, and the drag has great chase work. This is a great sword with outstanding eye appeal. $2700.00

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U726. M1850 STAFF & FIELD / MOUNTED OFFICERS SWORD: This sword is considered a Staff & Field sword because of the size of the guard, but also thought to be a Mounted Officers sword because of the metal scabbard. The hilt and pommel cap are tight with a pleasing patina, and the grip retains 100% original sharkskin grip and triple-strand wire. The bright blade has the original blade washer, is maker marked Clauberg and retailer marked Schuyler Hartley & Graham New York. The etching is frosty with a center panel with US and one with the spread eagle. The steel scabbard has a pleasing brown patina and dent free with evidence of wear on the drag.  $1375.00

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U732. AMES M1852 NAVAL OFFICER SWORD: This Ames M1852 Naval Officer sword is in great near-mint condition. A fellow dearer valued it at $3200.00; however, my price will be well below his assessment. The hilt and pommel cap have 95% original gold wash and are tight, and the grip and wire are 100% original and complete. The letter A is on the pommel cap. The blade is Ames marked and frosty, but has a few dark spots, but no rust or pitting. Also it is free of dings and micks. The Ames scabbard is strong with all its mounts, which retain generous amounts of gold wash. $2350.00

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C284. MITCHELL & TYLER (BOYLE & GAMBLE) CONFEDERATE FOOT OFFICER SWORD: Boyle & Gamble of Richmond, Virginia was the Confederacy’s most prolific maker of officer’s swords and the company’s field and staff officer’s sword is easily the most recognized sword produced during the Confederate era.  The firm made swords for retail sale as well as government contracts.  The company also supplied their high quality officer’s swords for resale to jewelry and military outfitter, Mitchell & Tyler, located on Main Street in Richmond, Virginia.  Mitchell & Tyler did no manufacturing, but sold the very finest swords, belts, buttons, and even laces and silverware.  In short, they sold everything and more, necessary for the dapper Confederate Officer.  The sword shown here is an example of the sword Boyle and Gamble made for Mitchell and Tyler. It is a standard Foot Officer sword with its original scabbard. The hilt and pommel cap have a deep reddish-brown patina, and displays great casting flaws. The original leather blade washer keeps the un-etched blade tight. The scabbard is original is strong and retains all original mounts, which have the original retention pins. This is a great example of a Confederate Foot Officers sword made by Boyle & Gamble for retail by Mitchell & Tyler. $6500.00

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C282. HAIMAN CONFEDERATE ENLISTED LIGHT ARTILLERY SABER: Louis Haiman of Columbus, Ga. produced a variety of Confederate swords to include enlisted artillery sabers, and this is a wonderful example of the crude workmanship common to Southern made swords. The entire sword is tight with no movement in the hilt or grip. You will see great casting flaws in the brass, the blade and the scabbard. The grip retains 100% original black leather and heavy steel wire, the blade has a deep patina and the scabbard his one of the worst lapped seam I have seen. Someone must have been drunk when making this scabbard. So crude, it is a work of art, and the scabbard fits the recess guard.  This is only the third example of this saber I have offered for sale, and the other two sold for over $9000.00.  This is available for less and is a great opportunity to own a rare Confederate saber. $7000.00

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C283. CONFEDERATE BONE HANDLE D-GUARD BOWIE: This knife is fresh to the market and was discovered at the Wheaton Civil War show.  It is another example of a war trophy that made its way north. The knife is 18 1/2 inches long with a 5 inch bone handle. The grip has brass ferrules, one at each end, and both are tight. Since the bone is over 150 years old it has shrunk and is no longer tight with expected movement. The grip is solid though it displeases expected stress fractures. The Brass ferrules have great patina. The steel guard is tight with no movement and has a dark patina. The 1 1/2 by 13 inch blade is diamond shaped with a double edge spear point. It show evidence of period sharpening and has sever nicks and dings.  This knife shows similar characteristics to a Georgia D-Guard featured on page 226 of the book Confederate Bowie Knives by Melton, Phillips & Sexton. Real Confederate bone handle D-Guard knives are rare. $2600.00

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