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U590.  SILVER HILT – M1850 FOOT OFFICERS / STAFF & FIELD SWORD – RARE – 13TH MAINE INFANTRY: This sword is often mistakenly identified as a Foot Officers sword, but in fact is a M1850 Staff & Field sword because the slightly larger and curved back basket guard. This particular design does not have a US in the guard and many dealers refer to it as Non-regulation, but it does conform to the Civil War sword guidelines.  Also, this sword is slightly rare for two reasons, first it has a German silver hilt, and secondly it is marked with a rare and unknown maker/retailer; O. LANGSDORF.  I have searched all my referenced and cannot find any information associated with this maker/retailer. The only thing I found was a past auction for another sword with the same markings. That being the case, there are only two known swords by this maker/retailer.  How rare is that!  O. LANGSDORF is stamped in the blade, the guard and the drag.

This sword was carried as is evident by its condition and great eye appeal. I believe it belonged to an officer in the 13th Maine infantry. The German silver grip retains all original wire, and the brass guard and pommel cap have an even untouched patina. The 31 1/5 inch blade is fully etched; however, it is faint as a result of use and period cleaning. I have seen other blades look this way because they were carried by soldiers in a region of the country exposed to salt air from the ocean. The 13th Maine performed service near the ocean, and I believe that accounts for the blades condition. The 13th Maine survived a hurricane along the Atlantic coast, served on Ship Island in the Gulf of Mexico, manned the forts guarding entry to the Mississippi, invaded Texas at Brownville and along the coast, fought in the Red River Campaign in Louisiana, guarded Washington DC, and patrolled trains along the Shenandoah Valley south of Harpers Ferry.

The blade is not pitted, but does have a few nicks. Also, notice the blunt tip, it is original and never had a sharp point. Again, this is a first!  The scabbard is original to the sword and very strong with a period repair of brass above the drag. The top mount is marked Me 13, which I believe is for the 13th Maine infantry. The rings on each mount are original and very small in design, and the original drag has been place upside down as a result of the brass band repair. This is a great looking sword, which displays well, and how often can you find a Silver hilt at this price?  $1175.00

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U589. M1850 FOOT OFFICERS SWORD: This is an M1850 Foot Officers sword, which is in great condition.  It has no identified maker, but my experience tells me it is American made and not an import because there is no IRON PROOF on the top spine of the blade. The hilt has a great look with traces of original gold wash. The shark-skin grip is near perfect with one worn spot and 100% original wire. There is a little movement due to some shrinkage in the wood. The blade retains lots of original frosting and the US and Eagle etching is strong, and the blade has never been sharpened.  The original scabbard shows some crazing, but is strong and retains all original mounts. Easily, a $1200.00 sword, but is available at a great holiday discounted price. $1025.00

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C234.  BOYLE & GAMBLE & MACFEE CS CAVALRY OFFICER SABER/SWORD: This is an example of a truly ULTRA-RARE and MOST DISTINCTIVE "Flat-Blade" CS Cavalry Officer's Sword by Boyle, Gamble & MacFee of Richmond Virginia.  It recently surfaced from a Mississippi family, which said it has been in their family since the Civil War, but do not know to which family member it belonged. The "Flat-Blade" Cavalry Officer saber/sword of B, G & M is so easily recognizable with their thick, smooth, no fuller/blood-groove in the large beautiful 33.5" long blade.  Total length is just shy of 40" long, which is shorter than an enlisted cavalry saber.  The handle/grip and basket are also very distinctive in their curved, elongated form, as well as the style/form of the pommel cap. As well, the wooden handle was "grooved" before being wrapped, to allow a nice recessed grooving for the wiring to be done, as is seen in all of these specimens. This blade has great eye appeal, a smooth even steely gray patina, and shows evidence of period sharpening. The guard and pommel cap have great untouched patina and show many casting flaws, and the grip retains much original leather and wire and has good carry wear. There is the remnant of an original Officer sword knot still attached to the guard. The scabbard is gone. $2500.00

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U588.  SAUERBIER M1850 STAFF & FIELD SWORD: Sometimes, I find a sword which is unique in many ways and gets me excited.  This is such a sword!  It might not be minty and bright, or shiny as many high-end pieces, but this has the age and wear that truly indicated it was carried in battle.  It is an unmarked Sauerbier M1850 Staff & Field sword in a Roby Staff & Field scabbard. Was it originally purchased in this configuration, or did the officer obtain a field replacement.  One will never know, but the patina on the brass matches on the sword and scabbard, and the fit is perfect.  As far as I am concern, it is all original to the war.  The pommel cap, and screw, and blade match Sauerbier designs. The grip retains 100% original shark-skin material, but is missing all but one strand of wire. The blade washer is gone, but the blade is tight. The blade is tired, but you can still see the original etching.  Also, the blade show original period sharpening. The scabbard retains all original mounts and screws and wood liners, and has great patina.  Oh, if this sword could only speak…I hear the faint sounds of battles in Virginia, Pennsylvania, maybe Shiloh or the march to the sea.  This sword will display well in any collection. $1025.00

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U587.  M1841 NAVAL CUTLASS – AMES: This is an Ames M1841 Naval Cutlass and it obviously saw service in both the war with Mexico (1846-48) and the Civil War. The brass hilt shows wear, but is tight with the rack number 99 stamped on the guards face by the blade.  The blade is Ames marked and U.S.N inspected / dated 1842, which often are worn off, and shows evidence of period sharpening as well as pitting from exposure to salt air.  $995.00

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F117.   M1816 - CONFEDERATE - CONVERSION MUSKETThis is an outstanding example of a Confederate converted M1816 musket. The lock, bolster are very unique and not of a Northern design. In fact, when you remove the barrel and the lock you will find the Roman numeral III marked on several parts.  It is on the wood under the lock, on the underside of the barrel, and on three of the internal lock parts.  This was a common practice associated with many Confederate repaired and altered musket.  The ram-rod has a cork screw twist that is often seen in other Confederate muskets.$2595.00

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F151.  CONFEDERATE 1853 ENFIELD RIFLE MUSKET - SINCLAIR, HAMILTON & CO - ARROW MARKED: During the Civil War a large proportionate of 1853 Enfield Rifle Muskets were supplied by the Sinclair, Hamilton & Company, and they may have received as many as five contracts from the Confederacy. Sinclair, Hamilton & Company acquired their arms through five furnishers: EP Bond, James Kerr, Parker, Field & Co, CW James and Scott & Son. The furnishers often marked their guns with a large single letter on the upper comb of the stock: B for Bond, a K for Kerr, and F for Parker, Field & Co, a J for James and an S for Scott & Son. These guns are found to have a Control Number on the butt plate, ram-rod, and the matching bayonet. Often the ram-rod and bayonet are no longer with the gun, or the numbers do not match due to the fact that these were interchangeable items. Also, these early muskets are normally JS  marked.

Later version of Sinclair, Hamilton & Company provided Rifle Muskets are found with the following marks and were acquired from many additional suppliers:

This is a Confederate 1853 Enfield rifle musket with the scares Sinclair Hamilton & Co. mark located on the stock by the butt plate tang. The musket stock is in great condition with no cracks or breaks with evidence of use, but not abused. All the metal has the same deep rich brown patina, and all parts are original to the gun. The lock has the standard CROWN and is dated 1862, and this gun was furnished by Isaac Hollis & Sons and is maker marked on the underside of the stock, on the lock, barrel, and lock chamber.  The bore shows heavy use, but you can still see some rifling. This musket is available at a great price. $2900.00

 

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U586. ROBY M1860 CAVALRY SABER – 1864:  This is a Civil War M1864 Cavalry Saber, which saw continued use into the Indian War period.  It is Roby made and dated 1864 and inspected A.G.M. The hilt is tight and the grip is original, but the wire has been replaced. The pommel cap is an M inspection mark.  The blade has no pitting or rust, but does show period sharpening. The scabbard fit tight to the blade and is original to the saber. It has taken on a nice patina and you can still see some of the period Indian War finish. On drag is the rake number, but it is a little hard to read.  I took this saber in trade, so I priced it for a quick sale and will give free shipping. $675.00

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F164.  AUSTRIAN M-1854 LORENZ RIFLE MUSKET - GEORGIA “G” MARKED: This is as exampleof the Austrian M-1854 Lorenz Rifle Musket, as imported by the Confederacy during the course of the American Civil War. The Lorenz was the third most used infantry arm on both sides during the war.  This gun is in the classic Confederate configuration, often referred to as a Type I by collectors. It retains its original 13.9mm (.54) bore, has a block rear sight, and a cheek-rest on the reverse of the butt stock. The gun is dated 861 for 1861 on the lock, forward of the hammer and the double-headed Austrian Eagle is stamped to the rear of the hammer at the tail of the lock. The top of the breech is stamped with the name of the maker SCHLAGER. The most interesting mark on the gun is a partial small capital G. Arms marked with this non-standard, small G were Georgia purchased and used. This Georgia G marked Austrian M-1854 Lorenz Rifle Musket is in very nice condition. The gun is quite crisp with fine edges on both the metal and the wood. The wood has a deep brown patina and all the metal parts have never been cleaned, and have matching number 18.  The original block rear sight, front sight/bayonet lug and both original sling swivels are present on the rifle. The bore of the gun is strong. The original 4-groove Austrian rifling remains crisp, and the bore is mostly bright. The original ramrod is in the channel under the barrel and it is full length, with fine threads on the end.  As noted, the stock is crisp and retains sharp edges and shows no signs of ever having been sanded. The Georgia G mark is slightly worn off, but enough is present and clear enough positively identify it as such. Overall this is simply a wonderfully untouched and unmolested Austrian M-1854 Lorenz Rifle Musket in the very desirable Type I configuration. The gun is a Georgia marked Confederate import. $1600.00

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F163.  MAYNARD CARBINE, SECOND MODEL: This is a Second Model Maynard Carbine made by Mass, Arms Co./Chicopee Falls, Mass. Company literature referred to it as the “Model 1863” made c. 1863-1865 with a total about 20,202 in 50 caliber. There do not have a patch-box and have a somewhat squared profile buttplate. Frame right side marked MANUFACTURED BY/MASS. ARMS CO./CHICOPEE FALLS, and the left side EDWARD MAYNARD/PATENTEE/MAY 27, 1851/DEC. 6 1859. Among the Union cavalry units armed with these were the 9th and 11th Indiana and the 11th Tennessee.   The stock on this gun has never been sanded and there are two strong cartouche stamped on the right side. There still remains lots of original finish on the metal with nice patina. Near the breach you can see some salt and pepper stippling from gun power, which indicated that the gun saw some use. On the underside it is dated 1865 with serial number 25265. The bore looks nice and bright and nice rifling. $1500.00

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U530.  AMES M1850 FOOT OFFICER SWORD – RARE VARIANT:  This Ames M1850 Foot Officer sword is a very rare variant in that it was never Ames marked and never etched.  No one knows for sure why these rare example exist, but it has been surmised the swords were either sold blank to retailers for resale, or to Confederate states. As the Southern states were preparing for war they placed orders for military arms from northern factories. Ames filled many  orders, but left their name of the items sent south. Either way, they are rare and not often encountered.  When you examine the hilt, you can see it conforms to all others made by Ames: the pommel cap design; the brazed connecting joint in the hand guard; the grip material and side seam, and the configuration of the double-strand wire. The wire has a period lead repair.The scabbard is pure Ames in its constructure with a bottom seam.  Both top mounts retain large original screws, but the screw for the bottom drag is missing. There are no breaks or bends in the scabbard, but there is minor crazing. Though rare, this sword does not break the bank and is very affordable, and will add to any collection.  PRICE $895.00

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U543. SAUERBIER CAVALRY OFFICER'S SABER, MID GRADE TYPE 1, PLAIN MOUNTS: Sauerbier cavalry officer's sabers are seldom encountered and always have distinctive features. This example is a mid-grade type 1 Officer's saber with plain mounts, and is the exact one featured on page 349 of the book “Civil War Cavalry & Artillery Sabers” by John H. Thillmann. It has an etched blade with a large panel with the maker mark, and bold block lettered US. The hilt is deeply engraved with a great chased quillion, guard and knuckle bow. The pommel cap is the unique Sauebier turned down version with a recessed spanner nut, and the grip is the typical oversized version with 100% original leather and wire. This is a rare saber to find, and how often do you have the chance to own one that is published and well documented.  $2895.00

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