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ACRYLIC SWORD & SCABBARD STAND: This pair of acrylic sword & scabbard stands was designed to hold one sword and its scabbard. Each is 5 inches tall and designed with square edge groves to prevent the sword or scabbard from flipping over as often happens with similar stands with a rounded cut. They will accommodate swords of all sized from small bowie knives to cavalry sabers.  This design presents a very clean and crisp display that is attractive. $27.00

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SK01. CIVIL WAR PERIOD - OFFICER’S SWORD KNOT: This is a Civil War period officer’s sword knot, which would adorn any general, field & staff, or company grade officer’s sword. Condition is excellent with no rips or tears, and is 100% original condition and a little dark with age. Shipping is included. $375.00

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U879. AMES M1832 FOOT ARTILLERY SWORD/SCABBARD/WHITE BUFF LEATHER BELT & BUCKLE, 1842 DATED: It is rare to find a Complete Ames M1832 foot artillery sword with the original scabbard, belt and buckle in near-mint condition. The sword is inspected UNITED STATED 1842 JCB and N.P. Ames Springfield under an eagle with W.A.T. in the cross guard. The blade is minty and reflective under a light spotty patina and the hilt has a brown-mustard patina. The scabbard is complete with no breaks, and the white buff leather belt is in near-mint condition with the original buckle. Simply one of the best complete examples I have had in a while. $2700.00

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F304. WHITNEYVILLE CONTRACT .58 CALIBER RIFLE MUSKET DATED 1864 - POSSIBLY CONFEDERATE CAPTURED & REISSUED: This is a Whitneyville Contract .58 Caliber Rifle Musket dated 1864. The rifle retains its original lock plate with eagle motif over ‘U.S’ to the right of the hammer and the dated “1864” behind the hammer. Under the bolster is “WHITNEYVILLE” in strong sharp stampings.  It has its original stock, iron nipple, bolster screw, and “C” shaped hammer, and the butt plate is "US' marked.  The barrel retains a faint "VP" and eagle marking, and the sight is sub inspected with a "W". The musket was a product of Eli Whitney’s firm he called the “Whitneyville-Armory production facility in Connecticut. From available records, it appears that the Whitney Armory turned out approximately 141,620 shoulder arms between 1826 and 1865, and most if not all of the Whitney long-arms of this period found their way into the hands of Union and Confederate soldiers. Once the war commenced in earnest, Whitney dedicated almost all of its arms production to the manufacture of arms for the Federal Government and the State of Connecticut.  In late 1861, the State of Connecticut bought 6,000 rifle-muskets closely following the M1861 pattern, but not quite to Government specs.  In 1862, Connecticut purchased an additional 8,000 rifle-muskets. There is a possibility this musket was Confederate capture and repurposed thought the Confederate State Ordnance “Cleaned and Repair” process. Many Confederate captured and reissued weapons simply required a light cleaning in order to pass inspection. Others, required more extensive repairs. After completing the work, the weapon would have been tested for functionality and then approved for re-issue by an inspector and marked with their respective stamp “A, F, Q, T, Z” before being shipped off for issuance in the Army of Northern Virginia. These 5 Confederate inspector marks are will known, but it is also known others may exist. This rifle is stamped “D” in the same area the other marks would be found. To date, this is the second gun I have seen with this “D” mark and I am still looking for others to positively confirm it as a Confederate “Clear & Repair” viewer mark. Until others are found, it is just a possibility, but when confirmed the value will increase. $1700.00

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F305. IDENTIFIED TRENTON RIFLE – MUSKET - 8TH NEW JERSEY INFANTRY: This is a very nice example of Civil War Trenton, NJ contract rifle-musket identified to a private from the 8th New Jersey Infantry. The gun is a properly marked for New Jersey with “US/TRENTON” and an Eagle forward of hammer and “1863” on tail of lock and on the barrel flat. A “VP/Eagle Head” proof and inspector initial “NJ” are on left side of the breech. On the left side of the stock opposite the lock is an Oval N J cartouche. The stock is solid with no major issues; all metal has matching deep rich brown patina; the lock properly functions and holds in both half & full cock positions, and the bore is bright with evidence of use. The tang-screw is broken and snapped off a long time ago and the ramrod is for an Enfield Rifle, which may indicate the gun was captured and possible Confederate used. On the top of the barrel is the name: A. Abbott. A search of the Civil War data base for New Jersey only found three possible matches, but the first two are easily eliminated leaving no doubt this gun belonged to Adner Abbott. Augustus Abbott: A musician in the 29th New Jersey Infantry was not issued a rifle. Abden Abbott was a soldier in the 12th New Jersey Infantry. This regiment was supplied with .69-caliber smoothbore muskets. He was wounded at Gettysburg and discharged for disability on 12/11/1863.  This leaves Abner Abbott.  He was mustered in on 8/8/1864 as a draftee private in Co. A, 8th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry on August 8, 1864. He saw action during the siege of Petersburg and was captured at an unknown location and sent to the POW camp at Salisbury, NC. He would die of pleurisy while a prisoner of war. His rifle may have been captured when he was taken prisoner. This may account for the damaged tang-screw and the Enfield ramrod. Here is an opportunity to own a Trenton Contract rifle identified to a soldier in the 8th New Jersey infantry, who was captured and dies as a POW; and who’s gun most likely was Confederate used just prior to the end of the war! $1800.00

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C385. CONFEDERATE – VIRGINIA CAVALRY SABER: Prior to the outbreak of the Civil War, the Secretary of War, Virginia’s John B. Floyd, in March of 1860 directed that 1,200 Ames manufactured sabers be forwarded to the State of Virginia. We know these were made between March and September of the same year and stamped 1860 & Ames. The Virginia sabers were void of U.S. inspector marks. Therefore, they can be positively identified by the lack of certain markings associated with US contracted sabers. This Model 1860 Ames saber is stamped "1860” with the other side stamped with Ames’ marking. The grip is 100% complete with crazing; retains all original twisted brass wire; a tight guard; throat washer; bright blade with period sharpening and original. On the underside of the guard are scratched two sets of initials: “D W Poun..” & “R M P”. These are hard to photo. The D W P letters are very sharp, but the remaining letters are faded. A search of the Civil War data base found one possible match for the first set of initials: Private D. W. Pound, 2nd Virginal Cavalry. He most likely was the original solder that carried this saber. The second set of initials, R M P, is more difficult to identify. There are four Virginia cavalry soldiers with these initials, and without more information an identification cannot be made.  Currently, I know of one other example available for $4200.00.  I can offer this for a discounted price. $3500.00

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C300. CONFEDERATE ARTILLERY SABER: This is a Confederate Artillery Saber from an unknown maker, of which I have seen three others like it. It has an oil cloth grip made to look like ray-skin; no remaining wire; a brass pommel cap and guard; an unstopped fuller blade, and a high-quality scabbard with brass mounts and rings. There are great casting flaws and filling marks on the guard, pommel cap and blade. I suspect that the higher-grade features on this saber my possibly make it an officer’s version. $4500.00

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U924. 1862 DATED - M1850 FOOT OFFICER’S SWORDS - COLLINS MADE, FELLOWS & CO. RETAILED: This M1850 Foot Officer’s sword was assembled and retailed in New York City by the silversmith Fellows & Co. It is a high-quality sword with a Collins 1862 dated blade and has very detailed etching. The hilt and pommel cap are attractive with traces of gold wash and a nice patina. The shark skin grip and wire are original and 100% complete. The red felt blade washer keeps the 31-inch blade tight. The blade is stamped Collins made and dated 1862 and etched Fellows & Co New York. It is frosty with strong etching to include: US, an eagle with an "E Pluribus Unum" ribbon, “In Union there is Strength” and “Liberty or Death.” The blade was never sharpened and is nick free. The metal scabbard has a nice brown patina and retains its fancy mounts. Simply a beautiful looking sword! $2400.00

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C350. CONFEDERATE - HAIMAN CAVALRY SABER, OFFICER VERSION: Over many years, I have inspected quite a few Haiman sabers. The majority have been the enlisted version, which have heavy steel wire; a steel lapped seam scabbard with crude brass mounts and steel rings; and an unmarked hilt. As with other Confederate sword makers of the time, Haiman did produce a Cavalry Officers saber, but no known example has been positively identified. That being said, I believe this saber may have been Haiman’s effort at the officer version. The basic design is the same as the enlisted with the exception that the hilt and pommel cap are numbered (151 for this saber); the grip material is similar, but the wire is twisted brass (loose on this sabe); and the scabbard is a higher quality product. In fact, the scabbard is believed to be McElroy made. It does not have a lapped seam and is well made with quality brass mounts and brass rings.  One only has to ask, why are there two basically different style sabers produced by Haiman? The only plausible answer is an Enlisted and Officers version.  I have seen less then 10 examples like this saber, but many more of the enlisted example. As such, this is a rare fine! $3800.00

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F300. RARE – SMITH ARTILLERY CARBINE – CONFEDERATE CAPTURED & REISSUED: This is an example of the Smith Carbine - Artillery version.  They are much rarer than the cavalry version and are missing from many collections. Its serial number is 4076. Serial number 4077 was issued to Company D 1st Massachusetts volunteer cavalry, but being that this is an artillery carbine, I cannot say for certain it went to this unit. The gun is in great condition with an even plum-brown patina, the stock is solid with no breaks or major dings. There is no Cavalry bar & ring, but instead are two sling swivels, one on the barrel band and the other on the bottom of the stock. On the underside, to the rear of the trigger tang, is stamped the letter “Z”.  The “Z” mark is associated with Captain Louis Zimmer, who was involved with Confederate cleaning and repair operations at Richmond. Many Captured and Reissued Confederate weapons simply required a light cleaning in order to pass inspection. Others, required more extensive repairs. After completing the work, the weapon would have been tested for functionality and then approved for re-issue by an inspector and marked with their respective stamp “A, F, Q, T, Z” before being shipped off for issuance in the Army of Northern Virginia. This gun is in amazing condition!  $3500.00

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C393a. CIVIL WAR BOWIE KNIFE with ORIGINAL SHEATH: This is an exceptional Civil War bowie knife! When I saw the sheath with the tool-worked design; the brass mounts with brass pins, and lead around the belt loop, I said Confederate. Then I looked at the knife with its polished wood grip; steel cap and brass ferrule and polished spear-point blade, I said maybe Union. The cutler who made this knife was skilled at his profession! It is one of the best Civil War bowie I have seen. It is 17 1/2 inches long with a 10 5/8-inch spear-point blade. The blade is made of high-quality steel, shows filling marks, and has a shape edge on both sides. The oak grip is solid with no breaks or movement, and is capped with a steel disk with a brass ferrule at the steel guard. The sheath is solid with no breaks, but has shrunk about a 1/4 inch. The brass mounts are pinned in place and have a design cut in the edge facing the leather. Confederate or Union, it does not matter, it is one of the finest examples of a Civil War bowie knife. $4100.00

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C393. CONFEDERATE - BLACKSMITH MADE - SIDE KNIFE: This is a Confederate Blacksmith made side knife. It is 14 3/4 inches long with a 10 7/8” x 15/8” blade made from a file. The blade was period sharpened; has an even brown patina; has blacksmith file marks; and some original file teeth marks. The eight-sided walnut grip is 4 1/2 inches long with several small steel pins. The wood is split on both sides, but the grip is tight with no movement. On the top of the grip is carved the name “S Johnson” however, this is a common name and a positive identification cannot be made. This is a great example of a Confederate Blacksmith made side knife! $1200.00

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F301. 2ND VERMONT INFANTRY ISSUED & ID’ED NORFOLK RIFLE-MUSKET - CONFEDERATE CAPTURED: This musket is dated 1863 and was made under the first contract with interchangeable parts. The gun was originally marked “US/NORFOLK” with an Eagle forward of the hammer and “1863” behind the lock. On the barrel top is the date 1863; VP/Eagle Head proof; the number 19; and the inspector initial “H” found on left side of the barrel. When issued, the stock had a maker mark “W. WELCH/NORFOLK.CT.” and a single long inspector’s cartouche opposite the lock, but these were removed when the gun was captured and went through the Confederate State Ordnance “Cleaned and Repair” process prior to being reissued to a Confederate soldier. While going-over the gun, a soldier’s name was discovered stamped in the butt plate below the top screw: A E Howard, as well as the Confederate State Ordnance “Cleaned and Repair” inspection letter “Q”.Since the Norfolk rifle-musket was made in Connecticut, it is highly probable it went to a soldier in New England. Private Adin E. Howard of the 2nd Vermont Volunteer Infantry, and his unit, was involved in many engagements in Virginia. Many Captured and Reissued Confederate weapons simply required a light cleaning in order to pass inspection. Others, required more extensive repairs. Due to the lack of original maker marks and Federal cartouches on the stock, it is speculated these marks were removed at the Confederate repair shop. After completing the work, the weapon would have been tested for functionality and then approved for re-issue by an inspector and marked with their respective stamp “A, F, Q, T, Z” before being shipped off for issuance in the Army of Northern Virginia. Finding a soldier identified rifle-musket from the 2nd Vermont Volunteer Infantry is rare, and even rarer to find one that was captured and Confederate reissued. $3250.00

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U923. TIFFANY PRESENTATION-GRADE AUSTRIAN HEAVY CAVALRY SABER: This is a very sophisticated designed saber with a slightly curved blade with a large cup-shape hilt; most likely Solingen made, but retailed by Tiffany. It is a high-grade saber with an intricate pattern chiseled into the guard with a unique cut-out design. The blade is Tiffany marked with bright frosted etching, and in a steel scabbard. There is a similar example featured on page 436 of the book: Civil War Cavalry & Artillery sabers by John H. Thillmann. Tiffany swords are very desirable, and this is a very rare cavalry officers’ saber! $3600.00

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F252. CONFEDERATE - PATTERN 1860 IRON MOUNTED RIFLE & NUMBERED RAMROD: This is a Pattern 1860 2-band rifle. It is a London made gun by Potts & Hunt and has all original factory mounts, screws, barrel and barrel bands. There is a faint Confederate viewer mark near the trigger tang, which may be from Sinclair, Hamilton & Company. The ramrod is number 507 and was with the gun when acquired, but there are no numbers on the stock. It most likely was switched during the heat of battle. On the underside of the stock forward of the trigger guard is a hole. The lock properly functions; all metal parts have matching patina, and the rifling is gone and now has a smooth bore. There are no sling swivels and where one would be to the rear, there is a screw. This gun originally was configured for the Royal Marine Corps, but has not British inspection marks and it was sold to the Confederacy instead. A bayonet comes with the gun. It is British inspected, has an oval C.G maker mark and serial number 151, but I do not know how long the two have been together. $1900.00

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C398. KENANSVILLE SHORT ARTILLERY SWORD: Condition, condition, condition!  This is by far one of the best examples of a Kenansville short artillery sword! The hilt has great casting flaws and file marks, and is held tight with the original leather washer. To find an example with the original blade washer is rare! The blade is in amazing condition with casting flaws; a wavy fuller; unsharpened edge, and a sharp point. There are matching “two dots” assembly marks on the hilt and blade.  $2400.00

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F287. CONFEDERATE - POTTS & HUNT - 1853 ENFIELD RIFLE – CIRCLE SCRIPT J H  - UNION CAPTURED & MASSACHUSETTS REISSUED: This is a Confederate purchased London Potts & Hunt 1853 Enfield rifle with a script J H within a circle, but it was captured on a blockade runner ship and reissued to A Company 44th Massachusetts Infantry. The gun is complete with strong rifling, and great untouched patina. On stock forward of the butt plate is the faint Confederate inspecting mark: Circle JH. On the butt plate is stamped A 44 Mass. The 44th Massachusetts infantry was outfitted with Enfields and equipment captured of a British Blockade runner ship. Their history reads “The corps is armed with Enfield rifles captured from an English steamer and their belts, bayonet-sheaths, and cap-pouches were similarly obtained. The 44th was organized at Readville and mustered in September 12, 1862. Moved to Newberne, N. C., October 22-27. Attached to 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, Dept. of North Carolina, to January, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 18th Army Corps, Dept. North Carolina, to May, 1863. Lee's Brigade, Defenses of Newberne, Dept. North Carolina, to June, 1863. Expedition from Newberne November 2-12, 1862. Action at Rawle's Mills November 2. Demonstration on Newberne November 11. Foster's Expedition to Goldsboro December 11-20. Kinston December 14. Whitehall December 16. Goldsboro December 17. At Newberne till February 10, 1863. Moved to Plymouth, N. C., February 10, and duty there till March 15. (Cos. "B" and "F" detached on outpost duty at Batchelor's Creek February 10 to May 1.) Skirmishes Deep Gully, Newberne, March 13-14 (2 Cos.). Regiment moved to Washington March 15. Siege of Washington March 30-April 20. Skirmish at Washington March 30 (Cos. "A" and "G"). Skirmishes at Washington April 3 and 15. Expedition from Newberne to relief of Little Washington April 7-10 (2 Cos.). Regiment moved to Newberne April 22-24, and duty there till June 6. Expedition toward Kinston April 27-May 1. Dover Road April 28. Moved to Boston, Mass., June 6-10. Mustered out June 18, 1863. $3200.00

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F279. CONFEDERATE 1853 ENFIELD RIFLE – DOUBLE SINCLAIR, HAMILTON & COMPANY MARKED & OVAL SHC MARKED BARREL: During the Civil War, a large number of 1853 Enfield Rifle Muskets were supplied by the Sinclair, Hamilton & Company. This Confederate 1853 3-band Enfield is in excellent condition with double Crown SHC marks on the stock and the rare Oval SHC mark on the barrel. The stock has expected ding, but no major issued; the metal has an even deep rich brown patina, and the rifling is strong. The action properly functions and hold in both half and full cock, and the nipple and protector are original as is the ram-rod. The barrel is proof marked * 24 * 24 * and has the rarely seen Oval SHC stamp. The lock is dated 1861. This is an early Enfield that no doubt saw action. $3200.00

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F292. AUSTRIAN M-1854 LORENZ RIFLE MUSKET: The Austrian M-1854 Lorenz Rifle Musket was a very popular rifle during the Civil War and many where imported by both the Union and Confederacy.  The design with the fixed blade site and the large cheek rest where more common to the South.  For this reason, I believe this is a Confederate carried Lorenz rifle. The stock has its share of dings and dents and is complete; has the letter A carved in the stock, as well as the initials “F L S” on the flat side of the stock, and a letter “S” stamped to the real of the trigger tang. All the metal has an even brown patina, the lock properly functions, both swivels and the ram-rod are original, but the nipple is replaced.  The bore retains sharp rifling. $1700.00

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C401. CONFEDERATE VIRGINIA MANUFACTORY SABER SCABBARD: This is a scabbard for a Virginia Manufactory Cavalry Saber that was reduced in length for the Civil War. The curved scabbard is 38 inches and will accept any Virginia Manufactory Cavalry Saber with a blade of less length. The scabbard is in great condition with an even brown patina. The frog devised was period removed and brass rings and mounts where added. The Virginia Manufactory Cavalry Saber listed above will fit, but the blade short for this scabbard. $2100.00

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U922. EMERSON & SILVER - M1850 MOUNTED INFANTRY OFFICER’S SWORD:  This is an Emerson & Silver Model 1850 Mounted Infantry Officer’s sword, which are rare comparted to the Foot Officer’s version.  Mounted Infantry Officer’s swords came with a metal scabbards whereas the Foot Officer’s scabbards were leather. The purpose of the scabbard was to protect the sword; as a result, this blade is in mint condition with a frosty etched blade. The hilt retains much of the original gold wash and 100% original shark skin grip and wire. To appreciate this sword, it should be displayed out of its scabbard! So, I am including a sword stand as well as free shipping. $1875.00

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U826. M1850 FOOT OFFICER’S SWORD:  This Model 1850 Foot Officer’s sword is a great entry-lever version of an iconic Civil War Officer’s sword, which was carried by every lieutenant and captain. The hilt is tight; has matching patina; 100% original black leather grip, but no wire. The 30 3/4-inch blade is marked IRON PROOF on the spin and etched with an American flag and a large US vertical to the blade, but no maker or retailer mark. The leather scabbard is near-mint condition with all mounts with even patina that match the hilt. Shipping is included. $685.00

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U921. M1850 FOOT OFFICER’S SWORD – SCHNITZLER & KIRSCHBAUM (S&K): This is a Schnitzler & Kirschbaum (S&K) M1850 Foot Officer’s sword, which is rarely seen. The hilt has a mellow patina with traced of original gold wash; is tight; retains 100% original sharkskin grip and triple-strand wire. The blade washer is gone, but the blade is still tight. The 31 1/2-inch blade has never been cleaned and retains strong etching with some original frosting under a gray patina and some salt & pepper spotting. It has never been sharpened and has a sharp point. The blade is Schnitzler & Kirschbaum Solingen marked with IRON PROOF on the spine. The black leather scabbard has expected crazing, but is solid and complete with all original mounts and screws. This is a great example of a rarely seen S&K M1850 Foot Officer’s sword. $1400.00

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F302. M1854 LEFAUCHEUX PIN-FIRE REVOLVERThe Lefaucheux Pin-Fire revolver was a new invention at the time of the Civil War. The primary importer was George Schuyler who purchased 10,000 revolvers for the US government. Other importers included Herman BokerSchuyler, Hartley & GrahamGeorge RaphaelAlexis Godillot of Paris and even Tiffany & Company. US cavalry units that received pinfire revolvers included the 5th IL, 2nd & 5th KS, 6th KY, 8th MO, 1st WI and the 9th MO State Militia Cavalry. The Springfield Research Service serial number books list the serial numbers for 69 Lefaucheux revolvers that were in the possession of Company B of the 9th Missouri State Militia Cavalry during 1863. These 69 revolvers range from serial number 33,895 through 42,522. This 9,000+ range of serial numbers within a single company of US cavalry makes it relatively easy to extrapolate that Lefaucheux revolvers within the 25,XXX through at least the 45,XXX range are within the realistic realm of US purchased revolvers that saw Civil War use. Confederate units under the command of General Nathan Bedford Forrest had at least a few hundred of these revolvers in their possession in late 1864. A May 25, 1864 Ordnance Report from Meridian, Mississippi by Forrest showed his 1st Division in possession of 190 French Pistols and his 3rd Division in possession of another 160. It is almost certain that these French Pistols were Lefaucheux revolvers. Additionally, in 1864 the Selma Arsenal was offering Lefaucheux revolvers for sale to Confederate officers.This is not a Northern contracted purchased gun, and there is no positive way to identify it as Confederate carried. It is considered a private purchased revolver. The gun is complete with the original unloading rod; locking cylinder latch; retains all original screws; lanyard-ring; original grips; crisp rifling and properly functions. The Lefaucheux mark is on top of the 6 1/4-inch barrel and on the side where a number 26 is also stamped.  The serial number is LF 73416. The grips are complete with much original finish and the number 16353 stamped on the left grip. The gun has a pleasing deep brown patina. Shipping is included. $975.00

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C404. CONFEDERATE NAVAL CUTLASSThis Confederate Naval Cutlass is fresh to the marked. It is 26 1/2 inches long with a 21-inch blade. The hilt is well made with eagles on the pommel; no rivets; but three dimples where they would have been. The guard has the stippling associated with a Confederate cutlass and other casting flaws, and has a deep reddish-brown patina. The blade washer is original and hold the blade tight, and the blade retains much of its original finish with s greyish patina. $2500.00  

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U918. MASSACHUSETTS PRESENTATION FOOT OFFICERS SWORD: Robert C.Nichols was an officer for the state of Massachusetts and served in the Civil War.  He received a presentation sword from the Webster Regiment; however, his association with this unit is unclear.The top mount has the followingpresentation:

LIEUT

ROBT. C. NICHOLS

FROM

Webster Regiment

May, 1861

He would serve in the 2nds Massachusetts Light Artillery as a private, and would be promoted to lieutenant and served in the 13th Massachusetts Light Artillery, which later was attached to his previous unit. The bulk of his service was in the state of Louisiana where he saw action in several engagements. His presentation sword is a basic French made Foot Officers. It is in outstanding condition with 100% original sharkskin grip and all original wire. The hilt, and pommel cap, have and even mallow patina and is tight. The original red felt washer is presents and it hold the bright blade tight. The unetched blade is mint with a mirror-like finish. The scabbard as well is in mint condition. It retains all original mount and has a bright blue mirror-like finish, which is rarely seen.  $2100.00

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