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C268. CONFEDERATE SHORT ARTILLERY SWORD: This rare sword is believed to be a variant of a Boyle & Gamble Confederate Short Artillery sword due to the cross-guard being similar to other known Boyle & Gamble produced short artillery swords. The brass hilt is heavy with great casting flaws to include the hole in the pommel. The sword is 25 inches long with a 19 1/4 inch blade, and the spear-point blade has a center fuller; great casting flaws, and period sharpening. $1800.00

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U683. AMES M1852 NAVAL OFFICER SWORD:  This Ames M1852 Naval Officer sword is in near-mint condition. The hilt is tight with 100% white shark-skin grip and double-strand twisted wire, and near 100% original gold wash. The Ames marked blade has the original blade washer and 100% frosted etching, with a great tip. The scabbard is one of the best I have seen with all its mounts and screws, no breaks, little crazing, and better than 95% original black finish. $2300.00

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U679. AMES TYPE-2 M1850 STAFF & FIELD SWORD: This is an earlier version of the Ames M1850 Type-2 Staff & Field sword as is evident by the block etched US on the blade. The hilt is tight with no movement, and retains original gold on the basket, but not the pommel cap or scabbard mounts. The remaining bass has a mixed reddish-brown patina. The shark-skin grip and double strand wire is 100% original. The blade washer holds the blade is tight.  Blade length is 32 inches and retains much original frosting with the standard eagle; block etched US and Ames marking. The type-2 scabbard is complete with all brass fittings and original screws. It is dent free and the brass mounts have the same matching patina as the hilt.  The blue scabbard has taken on a nice rich brown patina. This sword shows evidence of being carried, but was well maintained. $2100.00

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U689. AMES TYPE-2 M1850 STAFF & FIELD SWORD: This is an earlier version of the Ames M1850 Type-2 Staff & Field sword as is evident by the block etched US on the blade. The hilt is tight with no movement, and retains much original gold was mixed with a deep reddish-brown patina. The shark-skin grip and double strand wire is 100% original. There is no blade washer, but the blade is tight.  Blade length is 32 inches and retains much original frosting with the standard eagle; block etched US and Ames marking. There is some light peppering on the blade, but no rust or pitting.  The type-2 scabbard is complete with all brass fittings and original screws. It is dent free and the brass mounts have the same matching patina as the hilt.  The blue scabbard has taken on a nice rich brown patina. This sword shows evidence of being carried, but was well maintained. $2300.00

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U567. RARE - CIVIL WAR UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS STAFF NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICER'S SWORD: During the Civil War the Marine Corps was very small in size compared to the other military services, and as such Marine Corps Civil War swords are rare.  I initially thought this was a Bent & Bush made sword; however, a very knowledgeable and educated collector has positively identified this as being made by Ames. Most Marine Corps swords of this period, and following the war, were produced by Horstmann and that company is well known for marking their product. Horstmann had the first contract in early 1859 and the second contract went to Ames in November 1859, and Horstmann got the third contract in 1861. After that, Bent & Bush received all sword contracts.  This sword appears to be part of the second contract produced by Ames.

The swords hilt is the standard M1850 Foot Officers design produced by Ames with crude casting and black leather and twisted wire. The 30 1/4 inch blade is totally un-etched and void of any maker marks. The scabbard has two brass fittings, the top mount designed to be carried in a leather frog, and the brass drag. The scabbrd black leather has turned into rawhide. I have seen this before with some other Marine swords of this period and believe this occurred as a result of exposer to salt water while at sea. $2400.00

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F120.  PLYMOUTH RIFLE: This is a Plymouth Rifle produced by Whitney and dated 1864. The rifle is complete with its original rear site, ram-rod, and all factory parts. The metal has an even brown patina and has never been cleaned, and the stock has no issued.  The sling swivels are both present, but the front one is frozen.  The lock works in both half & full cock, and the plate is dated 1864, and the US and Whitneyville marks are faint; however, I do not see an eagle stamp and am not sure if one was ever there. The tang on the barrel has the serial number 9989, and there is still good rifling in the bore. This rifle was designed with a rifle lug for either a saber bayonet made by Collins or the Dahlgren Bowie bayonet knife, and many of these bayonets had to be fitted to the gun. $1495.00

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F178. CONFEDERATE ENFIELD ARTILLERY CARBINE – PATTERN 1853:  This is a beauty and rare find! This is the rifle many Confederate Cavalry troops wanted, and is so scarce that many collections are missing it. The P-1853 Artillery Carbine was particularly popular with Confederate General J.E.B. Stuart, the commander of the Army of Northern Virginia’s cavalry corps.  An October 7, 1862 message from Stuart states in part: “Application from General Stuart, commanding cavalry, to exchange rifles, for the Enfield carbines (artillery) in the hands of our infantry.”. This not only indicates Stuart’s preference for the short-barreled arm, but also indicates that some of these guns were seeing service in the ranks of Confederate infantry. The fact that it accepted a saber bayonet of the same pattern as the Pattern 1856/58/60 rifles made it a handy weapon for light infantry.

This is a Confederate M1853 Enfield Artillery carbine –  and it has just about every Confederate trait you could hope to find. It has the blockade “836” number on the butt plate; the soldiers name and initials carves in the stock; combat damage; matching assembler hash-marks on the barrel, lock, barrel underside, barrel retention screw, and one barrel band. The brass hardware has a beautiful deep unclean patina and the wood has the original finish and never been sanded or altered.  There is some wood damages around the tang and the lock plate and it most likely was sustained in combat. On the underside of the barrel is found the maker name BARNETT as well as additional numbers and initials, but more importantly are the Roman numeral hash-marks. The lock is marked HOLLAND London. On the inside of this lock, you can see four (IIII) hash marks, which match the same on the barrel’s under side to the right of the original initials I.J., and also appear on the top barrel band. On the barrel you will also see the marks (\\/II) which match those on the barrel retention screw. The sling swivels look to have been lost during the war and a hole was bored thought the stock to accommodate a lanyard. Upon closer examination, I found assembler hash-marks in the stocks ram-rod channel,which match those on the barrel.  Also, I was able to make out the serial number on the bayonet lug 825 or 875.

A respected collector/friend writes: "I think those hash marks are assembly numbers put there during manufacture. They are found on every Enfield I've ever seen. Since the lock matches with all the other hashes.. It was probably made that way .... When the maker ran out of locks and used whatever he could beg, or buy... Such as the CARR locks on LAC/KERR RMs and rifles. To get the case filled and out the door. Business before quality." It is still a rare piece..we figure less than 5000 shipped. And a very low survival rate.

These two-band rifles are scarce and this is made more rare and unique because it is identified to a soldier: Carved on the stock is the last name Goodwyn and the initials WTG. A search of all Confederate records reveals only one match: Private William T. Goodwyn from Tennessee.

A search of censes records for the state of Tennessee shows only one William T Goodwyn from the county of Davidson, and list his age as 21 in 1860, a farmer, and married. He originally enlists as a private on 12/18/1861 when mustered into "C" Co. TN 11th Cavalry Battalion. However, this was a short lived organization, and very little is known of its activities. This explains why only an initial enlistment muster sheet for Goodwyn exists. Shortly thereafter, he surfaces as a private in the “G” Co. TN 50th Infantry Battalion and would remain on this units muster rolls for the remainder of the war.

The 50th Tennessee Regiment, was organized at Fort Donelson December 25, 1861, and formed a portion of the garrison until the surrender of the fort on February 16, 1862, at which place and time, the majority being captured, were sent to Northern prison camps. Goodwyn appears on a Roll of Prisoners of War at Camp Douglas, Illinois, August 1, 1862, and was sent to Vicksburg to be exchanged September 5, 1862.

After being reorganized, the 50th Tennessee Regiment entered the heavy campaigns of Mississippi and East Louisiana and took active part in engagement on Chickasaw Bayou near Vicksburg in the latter part December, 1862. It remained at Port Hudson, Louisiana from January 7 to May 2, 1863, enduring one good shelling in this time. During this period, Goodwyn was still with “G” Company except when listed sick in Hospital at Meridian, Mississippi, May-June 1863. He returns to duty prior to the Battle of Chickamauga.  The 50th Tennessee Regiment went into this battle with 190 men, came out with about 50, and Private William T. Goodwyn was wounded on 13 September, 1863. He would remain in the hospital for the remainder of his service, and died September 10, 1864 of Cholera. This is a great carbine which will easily be a center piece in any collection. $8900.00

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C270. CONFEDERATE D-GUARD SIDE KNIFE: This is a great example of a Confederate D-Guard side knife that obviously was carried and saw the elephant. It is 19 1/2 inches long with a 14 1/2 inch x 1 inch blade. The iron guard has a flat shape, the blade displays great casting flaws and filling marks, and the wood grip is tight.  The grip has a carved 5-point star and what looks to be rudimentary carving of the first Confederate national flag. This knife previously sold for over $2200.00, but is available at a discounted price. $1700.00

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C271. CONFEDERATE D-GUARD SIDE KNIFE: This Confederate D-Guard side knife has characteristics of being black-smith made, but also similar to other known Arsenal Georgia knives. It is 20 inches long with a 15 inch clip-point blade. The blade is tight with casting flaws and a rich brown patina. The guard has a flat shape and nice look, and the grip has 7 concentric circles in its design, it also has a 3/4 inch ferrule.  This knife previously sold for over $2650.00, but is available at a discounted price. $1900.00

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C272. CONFEDERATE D-GUARD SIDE KNIFE: This Confederate D-Guard side knife is complete with its crude leather scabbard. The knife is 15 inches long with a 10 3/4 inch clip-point curved blade made from a file. The walnut grip is solid with no movement. The iron guard has a unique shape and is held tight with several pins where pinned.  You can see the original file marks on both side of the blade. The scabbard is crude, but complete. This knife previously sold for over $2100.00, but is available at a discounted price. $1600.00

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U682. HIGH-GRADE UNMARKED AMES M1850 PRESENTATION GRADE STAFF & FIELD SWORD:  This is an amazing high-grade unmarked Ames M1850 presentation grade Staff & Field sword. The hilt retains almost all its original gold wash, and has beautiful chase work. The shark-skin grip and wire is 100% original. The blade retains 100% original frosting and is decorated with several battle scenes that simply are amazing. The scabbard is in near-mint condition with fancy mounts that have great chase work on all sided. Also, included are the original gold washed hanger chains.  It will be hard to find a better example! $6995.00

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U690. HIGH-GRADE GERMAN SILVER HILT M1850 STAFF & FIELD SWORD WITH PENNSYLVANIA CENTER SCABBARD MOUNT: This is a M1850 Staff & Field Sword with a high-grade shark-skin scabbard with the state seal for Pennsylvania in the middle mount, and a German silver grip. The basket is the large Staff & Field design without the US, which is regulation. It retains much original gold wash, and the grip retains its German silver and triple strand wire. The original red felt washer is 90% complete and keep the blade tight. The blade is marked Collins & Co. Hartford Conn 1862, and is etched 23 1/2 inches on both sides of a 30 inch blade. Etching includes and eagle, crossed flags, and US. There is some light spider-surface pitting, but nothing major. The scabbard is shark-skin with high-end raised ring mounts, with the PA state seal on the middle, and rope rings. This is a very unique sword!  $3300.00    

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